Are breastfed infants less likely to develop eczema than formula-fed infants?

Last updated: February 20, 2022
We cannot identify an answer to this question. This could be because the studies in this list found that there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion. It also could be because we were not able to identify the answers that the studies gave to the question based on the texts of the studies. As additional studies on this question are published, we may be able to identify an answer.
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Chart summary of 2 studies examining this question

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Literature Reviews
Although we recommend you consider all of the studies below, we believe the following study is a literature review, which surveys and evaluates many studies on this question:

SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 2
Sorted by publication year
1
Breastfeeding and Allergic Diseases: What’s New?
"Most of the data regarding the association between breastfeeding and the developmentof AD come from birth cohorts or cross-sectional studies. In a large observational studythat evaluated more than two hundred thousand babies worldwide, The InternationalStudy of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), the authors could not find evidencefor a protective effect of breastfeeding on the development of AD at 6 to 7 years of age,although they reported protection against its severe form. The results of the systematicreview and meta-analysis by Lodge et al. show that infants exclusively breastfed for more than 3 to 4 months have a lower risk of developing AD, although this protective effectceases after 2 years. The authors also highlighted a high risk of bias from smaller studiesshowing more significant protective effects."
AUTHOR
Giulia Nuzzi
PUBLISHED
2021 Children
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2
The Effects of Early Nutritional Interventions on the Development of Atopic Disease in Infants and Children: The Role of Maternal Dietary Restriction, Breastfeeding, Hydrolyzed Formulas, and ...
"This clinical report updates and replaces a 2008 clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which addressed the roles of maternal and early infant diet on the prevention of atopic disease, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, and food allergy. As with the previous report, the available data still limit the ability to draw firm conclusions about various aspects of atopy prevention through early dietary interventions. Current evidence does not support a role for maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy or lactation. Although there is evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for 3 to 4 months decreases the incidence of eczema in the first 2 years of life, there are no short-or long-term advantages for exclusive breastfeeding beyond 3 to 4 months for prevention of atopic disease. The evidence now suggests that any duration of breastfeeding 3 to 4 months is protective against wheezing in the first 2 years of life, and some evidence suggests that longer duration of any breastfeeding protects against asthma even after 5 years of age. No conclusions can be made about the role of breastfeeding in either preventing or delaying the onset of specific food allergies. There is a lack of evidence that partially or extensively hydrolyzed formula prevents atopic disease. There is no evidence that delaying the introduction of allergenic foods, including peanuts, eggs, and fish, beyond 4 to 6 months prevents atopic disease. There is now evidence that early introduction of peanuts may prevent peanut allergy."
AUTHOR
Frank R. Greer
PUBLISHED
2019 Pediatrics
Literature Review
High Quality Source
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