Are infants who are breastfed less likely to develop autism than infants who are formula-fed?

Last updated: February 20, 2022
We cannot identify an answer to this question. While one study provided an answer, we could not find the answer from the other study in this list. This could be because the study found insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion. It also could be because we were not able to identify the answer that the study gave to the question from the text of the study. As additional studies on this question are published, we may be able to identify an answer.
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YES ANSWERS
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NO ANSWERS
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NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 2 studies examining this question

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Literature Reviews
Although we recommend you consider all of the studies below, we believe the following studies are literature reviews, which survey and evaluate many studies on this question:

SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 2
Sorted by publication year
1
Association of breastfeeding status with risk of autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review, dose-response analysis and meta-analysis
"Current evidence indicates that nutritional status in newborns, especially the duration of breastfeeding, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder. We aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze relevant studies with findings of an association between autism spectrum disorder and breastfeeding patterns, and undertook an extensive dose-response analysis to interpret the results more accurately. Ten electronic databases and manual search of reference lists were used to identify relevant studies in September 2018. Dose-response and conventional meta-analysis were conducted by the random-effects model. The study protocol was registered in PROSPERO with CRD42016043128. Seven case-control studies were found in which the association between ever breastfeeding and risk of autism spectrum disorder was investigated. We found a 58 % decrease in the risk of autism spectrum disorder with ever breastfeeding and a 76 % decrease in the risk with exclusive breastfeeding. According to our dose-response meta-analysis, breastfeeding for 6 months was associated with a 54 % reduction in the risk. In the conventional meta-analysis, breastfeeding for 12–24 months was associated with the most significant reduction in the risk of autism spectrum disorder. Our results highlight the importance of breastfeeding to decrease the risk of autism spectrum disorder."
AUTHOR
SheriefGhozy
PUBLISHED
2020 Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Literature Review
Yes
Yes
2
Maternal breastfeeding and autism spectrum disorder in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis
"Objectives: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a group of conditions variably affecting communicative and social interactive abilities presenting alongside behaviors with various restricted and repetitive patterns. In addition to genetic factors that influence the onset of the symptoms, there is growing interest in the potential involvement of non-genetic environmental factors. Some aspects of breastfeeding practices, including rates, timing, or optimality, have been put forward as environmental risk factors for autism. However, previous studies showed a controversial relationship between ASD and breastfeeding.Methods: A meta-analysis on the association between maternal breastfeeding and ASD in children was conducted. We also explored potential moderating factors which might influence this association. Articles reporting the association between breastfeeding and a diagnosis of ASD were included.Results: Seven articles were included in the meta-analysis. Cumulatively, children with ASD (n = 1463), either in the form of clinical diagnosis or self-report, were significantly less likely to have been breastfed than children without ASD (n = 1180) (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.45–0.83, P = 0.002). Subgroup analyses revealed that results remained significant for children who were breastfed with additional supplementation.Discussion: This meta-analysis provides evidence that breastfeeding (exclusively or including additional supplements) may protect against ASD. Prospective longitudinal research is required to disentangle the complex relationships and to explore potential pathophysiological mechanisms."
AUTHOR
PT Tseng
PUBLISHED
2019 Nutritional Neuroscience
Literature Review
Couldn't Identify
Couldn't Identify