Are voter ID laws always impartially enforced?

Last updated: February 20, 2022
No. Both studies in this list that examine the question agreed on this conclusion. Two studies are often not sufficient to be certain about a conclusion so we encourage you to refer to this study merely as food for thought.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong. For medical questions, don't rely on the information here. Consult a medical professional.
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YES ANSWERS
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NO ANSWERS
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Chart summary of 2 studies examining this question

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 2
Sorted by publication year
1
Waiting to Vote in the 2016 Presidential Election: Evidence from a Multi-county Study
"This paper is the result of a nationwide study of polling place dynamics in the 2016 presidential election. Research teams, recruited from local colleges and universities and located in twenty-eight election jurisdictions across the United States, observed and timed voters as they entered the queue at their respective polling places and then voted. We report results about four specific polling place operations and practices: the length of the check-in line, the number of voters leaving the check-in line once they have joined it, the time for a voter to check in to vote (i.e., verify voter’s identification and obtain a ballot), and the time to complete a ballot. Long lines, waiting times, and times to vote are closely related to time of day (mornings are busiest for polling places). We found the recent adoption of photographic voter identification (ID) requirements to have a disparate effect on the time to check in among white and nonwhite polling places. In majority-white polling places, scanning a voter’s driver’s license speeds up the check-in process. In majority nonwhite polling locations, the effect of strict voter ID requirements increases time to check in, albeit modestly."
AUTHOR
Robert M. Stein
PUBLISHED
2019 Political Research Quarterly
No
No
2
Can Voter ID Laws Be Administered in a Race-Neutral Manner? Evidence from the City of Boston in 2008
"Is it feasible in the current United States to administer voter identification laws in a race-neutral manner? In this paper, we studied a jurisdiction and an election in which such laws would be unlikely to pose issues of racial difference. We also used state-of-the-art field methods and statistical techniques to account for sources of uncertainty that previous studies had suppressed, including survey non-response. Our results are discouraging. We find strong evidence that Hispanic voters, and reasonably strong evidence that black voters, were asked for identification at higher rates than white voters. The magnitudes of the differences are troubling. We suggest that it may not be feasible to administer voter ID laws in a race-neutral manner in the current United States, and we explore the theoretical and legal consequences of such a conclusion."
AUTHOR
Rachael V. Cobb
PUBLISHED
2014 Quarterly Journal of Political Science
No
No