Do infants who are breastfed develop asthma less frequently that infants who are formula-fed?

Last updated: February 20, 2022
We cannot identify an answer to this question. While one study provided an answer, we could not find the answer from the other study in this list. This could be because the study found insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion. It also could be because we were not able to identify the answer that the study gave to the question from the text of the study. As additional studies on this question are published, we may be able to identify an answer.
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YES ANSWERS
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NO ANSWERS
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NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 2 studies examining this question

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Literature Reviews
Although we recommend you consider all of the studies below, we believe the following studies are literature reviews, which survey and evaluate many studies on this question:

SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 2
Sorted by publication year
1
Breastfeeding and risk of childhood asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
"Objective To investigate the relationship between breastfeeding and the development of paediatric asthma.Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health source databases. Retrospective/prospective cohorts in children aged <18 years with breastfeeding exposure reported were included. The primary outcome was a diagnosis of asthma by a physician or using a guideline-based criterion. A secondary outcome was asthma severity.Results 42 studies met inclusion criteria. 37 studies reported the primary outcome of physician-/guideline-diagnosed asthma, and five studies reported effects on asthma severity. Children with longer duration/more breastfeeding compared to shorter duration/less breastfeeding have a lower risk of asthma (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.75–0.93; I2 = 62.4%). Similarly, a lower risk of asthma was found in children who had more exclusive breastfeeding versus less exclusive breastfeeding (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.72–0.91; I2=44%). Further stratified analysis of different age groups demonstrated a lower risk of asthma in the 0–2-years age group (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.63–0.83) and the 3–6-years age group (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55–0.87); there was no statistically significant effect on the ≥7-years age group.Conclusion The findings suggest that the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding are associated with a lower risk of asthma in children aged <7 years."
AUTHOR
Mike Xue
PUBLISHED
2021 ERJ Open Research
Literature Review
Yes
Yes
2
Breastfeeding and the Developmental Origins of Asthma: Current Evidence, Possible Mechanisms, and Future Research Priorities
"Breastfeeding has many established short- and long-term benefits for maternal and child health, including protection from infections and enhanced neurodevelopment during infancy, reduced risk of obesity later in childhood, and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and breast cancer among mothers who breastfeed [10]. However, the impact of breastfeeding on asthma remains unclear. This uncertainty is reflected in the inconsistent results from many previous studies with significant methodological limitations and is likely also related to the tremendous biological variability in human milk. Further epidemiologic and biomedical research is needed to clearly define the association of breastfeeding and asthma development, to establish causality, and to characterize the underlying biological mechanisms."
AUTHOR
Kozeta Miliku
PUBLISHED
2018 Nutrients
Literature Review
Couldn't Identify
Couldn't Identify