Do voter ID laws increase trust in elections?

Last updated: February 20, 2022
There is no consensus in the literature on this question. We encourage you to read the study summaries below or the studies themselves if you have access.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong. For medical questions, don't rely on the information here. Consult a medical professional.
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YES ANSWERS
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NO ANSWERS
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NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 3 studies examining this question

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 3
Sorted by publication year
1
Photo identification laws and perceptions of electoral fraud
"Photo identification (ID) laws are often passed on the premise that they will prevent voter fraud and/or reduce perceptions of electoral fraud. The impact of ID laws on perceptions of electoral fraud remains unsettled and is complicated by widespread confusion about current voting requirements. In the 2017 Virginia election, we fielded an experiment, with an advocacy organization, evaluating the effects of the organization’s outreach campaign. We randomized which registered voters were mailed one of three informational postcards. After the election, we surveyed subjects about electoral integrity and their knowledge about election laws. We find that providing registrants with information on the state’s photo ID requirements is associated with a reduction in perceptions of fraud and increased knowledge about voting requirements."
AUTHOR
Kyle Endres
PUBLISHED
2021 Research and Politics
High Quality Source
Yes
Yes
2
A Partisan Model of Electoral Reform: Voter Identification Laws and Confidence in State Elections
"We propose a model of public response to politicized election reform. In this model, rival partisan elites send signals on the need and consequences of a proposed reform, with partisans in public adopting those positions. We apply this to test how state use of voter identification laws corresponded with public evaluations of the conduct of a state's elections. We find that the relationship between photo identification laws and confidence in state elections was polarized and conditioned by party identification in 2014. Democrats in states with strict photo identification laws were less confident in their state's elections. Republicans in states with strict identification laws were more confident than others. Results suggest strict photo identification laws are failing to instill broad-based confidence in elections, and that the reform could correspond with diminished confidence among some."
AUTHOR
Shaun Bowler
PUBLISHED
2016 State Politics & Policy Quarterly
High Quality Source
No
No
3
Revisiting Public Opinion on Voter Identification and Voter Fraud in an Era of Increasing Partisan Polarization
"This Article updates previous findings concerning the relationship betweenvoter identification laws and perceptions of voter fraud. Courts have established that voteridentification laws can be justified as measures that safeguard “voter confidence.” Wedemonstrate once again, but with the benefit of new survey data, that people who live instates with voter identification laws do not have greater confidence in elections orperceive lower rates of voter impersonation fraud. Since we last published on the subject,however, we notice an increase in the partisan structure of public opinion on voteridentification and voter fraud. As the issue has become more salient and partisan in tone,partisan identity has become a more powerful variable in predicting both support forvoter identification laws and beliefs in the prevalence of voter fraud. We note, however,that strong majorities continue to support such laws, even though a large share of thepopulation remains unaware of the existence of voter identification requirements."
AUTHOR
Charles Stewart III
PUBLISHED
2016 Stanford Law Review
High Quality Source
No
No