Do adults get sick from COVID-19 more often than children?

Submitted by: JLjilijana 85

Yes. While the bulk of the studies in this list for which we identified answers agrees with this conclusion, some studies came to different conclusions. We encourage you to consider each of the studies for yourself to understand why they differ. Note that some studies in this list give us reason to question their conclusions. This may be because they were published in sources that are not peer-reviewed, are low ranked or not ranked at all, which may indicate limited editorial oversight. Alternatively, it may be because they were criticized in a published article or produced by a financially interested or ideologically motivated source. Carefully review the individual study summaries below for more information.
NOTE: New research on COVID-19 comes out nearly every day. The state of our knowledge may change quickly so take this answer with a grain of salt.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 10 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong. For medical questions, don't rely on the information here. Consult a medical professional.


Chart summary of 10 studies examining this question

All answers are assigned by State of K users. The label Couldn't Identify means that State of K was not able to determine whether a study answers the question "yes" or "no". This could be due to several factors. One possibility is that a study found some evidence to indicate that the answer to the question is "yes" and some evidence to indicate that the answer is "no". This often happens when a study uses two or more proxies to study the same phenomenon (i.e. firearm sales figures and self-reported firearm ownership rates as proxies for the prevalence of firearms) and the proxies yield different results when looking for correlations with another phenomenon (i.e. firearm-related deaths). Alternatively, the label may be applied if the phenomenon under study (i.e. whether breast milk improves cognitive function) is true for one group, but not another (i.e. true for girls, but not for boys). Yet another possibility is that a study found there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion regarding the question. Finally, the full text or abstract of a study may not have been written clearly or was inaccessible. This would make it difficult to determine how a study answered a question.

All labels of Literature Reviews and source quality are assigned by State of K. For academic journals, the label "Q[NUMBER]" is an indication of the quality of the publication. The "NUMBER" refer to the best quartile in which the journal appeared among all the subjects in which the journal was ranked by Scimago Institutions Rankings. For example, if a journal was ranked in the third quartile (Q3) in infectious diseases, but in the second quartile in Ebola studies (Q2), you would see "Q2". The best quartile is "Q1". Publications other than academic journals may be labeled as "Highly Regarded Sources". Government sources receive this label as do NGOs ranked by the TTCSP Global Go To Think Tank Index Reports. The information contained in a source that is labeled "highly regarded" or "Q1" is not necessarily more accurate than information contained in a source without that label, but these are rough guides to source quality.

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Are cloth masks as effective as surgical masks at reducing the risk of contracting viruses that cause respiratory disease?
6 studies
Submitted by: MChoi 148

Can you contract COVID-19 twice?
5 studies
Submitted by: JAloni 117

Do cloth masks reduce the risk of contracting viruses that cause respiratory disease?
10 studies
Submitted by: JAloni 117

Does air pollution accelerate the spread of COVID-19?
7 studies
Submitted by: JLjilijana 85

Does air pollution increase the severity of symptoms from COVID-19?
6 studies
Submitted by: KKrista 83

Does an N95 mask reduce the risk of contracting viruses that cause respiratory disease better than a surgical mask?
17 studies
Submitted by: ELee 65

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 10
Sorted by publication year
1
Persons Evaluated for 2019 Novel Coronavirus - United States, January 2020
"In December 2019, a cluster of cases of pneumonia emerged in Wuhan City in central China's Hubei Province. Genetic sequencing of isolates obtained from patients with pneumonia identified a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) as the etiology (1). As of February 4, 2020, approximately 20,000 confirmed cases had been identified in China and an additional 159 confirmed cases in 23 other countries, including 11 in the United States (2,3). On January 17, CDC and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection began health screenings at U.S. airports to identify ill travelers returning from Wuhan City (4). CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center on January 21 and formalized a process for inquiries regarding persons suspected of having 2019-nCoV infection (2). As of January 31, 2020, CDC had responded to clinical inquiries from public health officials and health care providers to assist in evaluating approximately 650 persons thought to be at risk for 2019-nCoV infection. Guided by CDC criteria for the evaluation of persons under investigation (PUIs) (5), 210 symptomatic persons were tested for 2019-nCoV; among these persons, 148 (70%) had travel-related risk only, 42 (20%) had close contact with an ill laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV patient or PUI, and 18 (9%) had both travel- and contact-related risks. Eleven of these persons had laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection. Recognizing persons at risk for 2019-nCoV is critical to identifying cases and preventing further transmission. Health care providers should remain vigilant and adhere to recommended infection prevention and control practices when evaluating patients for possible 2019-nCoV infection (6). Providers should consult with their local and state health departments when assessing not only ill travelers from 2019-nCoV-affected countries but also ill persons who have been in close contact with patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection in the United States."
AUTHORS
Anderston TC
Stenger MR
Lindstrom S
McGovern OL
Oster AM
Bajema KL
PUBLISHED
2020 in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
High quality source
Yes
Yes
2
Clinical findings in a group of patients infected with the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-Cov-2) outside of Wuhan, China: retrospective case series
"OBJECTIVE:To study the clinical characteristics of patients in Zhejiang province, China, infected with the 2019 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-2019).DESIGN:Retrospective case series.SETTING:Seven hospitals in Zhejiang province, China.PARTICIPANTS:62 patients admitted to hospital with laboratory confirmed SARS-Cov-2 infection. Data were collected from 10 January 2020 to 26 January 2020.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Clinical data, collected using a standardised case report form, such as temperature, history of exposure, incubation period. If information was not clear, the working group in Hangzhou contacted the doctor responsible for treating the patient for clarification.RESULTS:Of the 62 patients studied (median age 41 years), only one was admitted to an intensive care unit, and no patients died during the study. According to research, none of the infected patients in Zhejiang province were ever exposed to the Huanan seafood market, the original source of the virus; all studied cases were infected by human to human transmission. The most common symptoms at onset of illness were fever in 48 (77%) patients, cough in 50 (81%), expectoration in 35 (56%), headache in 21 (34%), myalgia or fatigue in 32 (52%), diarrhoea in 3 (8%), and haemoptysis in 2 (3%). Only two patients (3%) developed shortness of breath on admission. The median time from exposure to onset of illness was 4 days (interquartile range 3-5 days), and from onset of symptoms to first hospital admission was 2 (1-4) days.CONCLUSION:As of early February 2020, compared with patients initially infected with SARS-Cov-2 in Wuhan, the symptoms of patients in Zhejiang province are relatively mild."
AUTHORS
Ma CL
Ying LJ
Xu KJ
Jiang XG
Wu XX
Xu XW et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in BMJ : British Medical Journal
High quality source
Yes
Yes
3
Similarity in Case Fatality Rates (CFR) of COVID-19/SARS-COV-2 in Italy and China
"As of 28 February 2020, Italy had 888 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infections, with most cases in Northern Italy in the Lombardia and Veneto regions. Travel-related cases were the main source of COVID-19 cases during the early stages of the current epidemic in Italy. The month of February, however, has been dominated by two large clusters of outbreaks in Northern Italy, south of Milan, with mainly local transmission the source of infections. Contact tracing has failed to identify patient zero in one of the outbreaks. As of 28 February 2020, twenty-one cases of COVID-19 have died. Comparison between case fatality rates in China and Italy are identical at 2.3. Additionally, deaths are similar in both countries with fatalities in mostly the elderly with known comorbidities. It will be important to develop point-of-care devices to aid clinicians in stratifying elderly patients as early as possible to determine the potential level of care they will require to improve their chances of survival from COVID-19 disease."
AUTHORS
Serra C
Kelvin N
Kelvin D
Rubino S
Porcheddu R
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Infection in Developing Countries
Q2
Yes
Yes
4
Immediate Psychological Responses and Associated Factors during the Initial Stage of the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Epidemic among the General Population in China
"Background: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic is a public health emergency of international concern and poses a challenge to psychological resilience. Research data are needed to develop evidence-driven strategies to reduce adverse psychological impacts and psychiatric symptoms during the epidemic. The aim of this study was to survey the general public in China to better understand their levels of psychological impact, anxiety, depression, and stress during the initial stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. The data will be used for future reference. Methods: From 31 January to 2 February 2020, we conducted an online survey using snowball sampling techniques. The online survey collected information on demographic data, physical symptoms in the past 14 days, contact history with COVID-19, knowledge and concerns about COVID-19, precautionary measures against COVID-19, and additional information required with respect to COVID-19. Psychological impact was assessed by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and mental health status was assessed by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Results: This study included 1210 respondents from 194 cities in China. In total, 53.8% of respondents rated the psychological impact of the outbreak as moderate or severe; 16.5% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms; 28.8% reported moderate to severe anxiety symptoms; and 8.1% reported moderate to severe stress levels. Most respondents spent 20-24 h per day at home (84.7%); were worried about their family members contracting COVID-19 (75.2%); and were satisfied with the amount of health information available (75.1%). Female gender, student status, specific physical symptoms (e.g., myalgia, dizziness, coryza), and poor self-rated health status were significantly associated with a greater psychological impact of the outbreak and higher levels of stress, anxiety, and depression (p < 0.05). Specific up-to-date and accurate health information (e.g., treatment, local outbreak situation) and particular precautionary measures (e.g., hand hygiene, wearing a mask) were associated with a lower psychological impact of the outbreak and lower levels of stress, anxiety, and depression (p < 0.05). Conclusions: During the initial phase of the COVID-19 outbreak in China, more than half of the respondents rated the psychological impact as moderate-to-severe, and about one-third reported moderate-to-severe anxiety. Our findings identify factors associated with a lower level of psychological impact and better mental health status that can be used to formulate psychological interventions to improve the mental health of vulnerable groups during the COVID-19 epidemic."
AUTHORS
Wang C
Xu L
Ho RC
Ho CS
Wan X
Pan R et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Q2
Yes
Yes
5
Clinical and CT Imaging Features of the COVID-19 Pneumonia: Focus on Pregnant Women and Children
"BACKGROUND:The ongoing outbreak of COVID-19 pneumonia is globally concerning. We aimed to investigate the clinical and CT features in the pregnant women and children with this disease, which have not been well reported.METHODS:Clinical and CT data of 59 patients with COVID-19 from January 27 to February 14, 2020 were retrospectively reviewed, including 14 laboratory-confirmed non-pregnant adults, 16 laboratory-confirmed and 25 clinically-diagnosed pregnant women, and 4 laboratory-confirmed children. The clinical and CT features were analyzed and compared.FINDINGS:Compared with the non-pregnant adults group (n = 14), initial normal body temperature (9 [56%] and 16 [64%]), leukocytosis (8 [50%] and 9 [36%]) and elevated neutrophil ratio (14 [88%] and 20 [80%]), and lymphopenia (9 [56%] and 16 [64%]) were more common in the laboratory-confirmed (n = 16) and clinically-diagnosed (n = 25) pregnant groups. Totally 614 lesions were detected with predominantly peripheral and bilateral distributions in 54 (98%) and 37 (67%) patients, respectively. Pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) was the predominant presence in 94/131 (72%) lesions for the non-pregnant adults. Mixed consolidation and complete consolidation were more common in the laboratory-confirmed (70/161 [43%]) and clinically-diagnosed (153/322 [48%]) pregnant groups than 37/131 (28%) in the non-pregnant adults (P = 0·007, P < 0·001). GGO with reticulation was less common in 9/161 (6%) and 16/322 (5%) lesions for the two pregnant groups than 24/131 (18%) for the non-pregnant adults (P = 0·001, P < 0·001). The pulmonary involvement in children with COVID-19 was mild with a focal GGO or consolidation. Twenty-three patients underwent follow-up CT, revealing progression in 9/13 (69%) at 3 days whereas improvement in 8/10 (80%) at 6-9 days after initial CT scans.INTERPRETATION:Atypical clinical findings of pregnant women with COVID-19 could increase the difficulty in initial identification. Consolidation was more common in the pregnant groups. The clinically-diagnosed cases were vulnerable to more pulmonary involvement. CT was the modality of choice for early detection, severity assessment, and timely therapeutic effects evaluation for the cases with epidemic and clinical features of COVID-19 with or without laboratory confirmation. The exposure history and clinical symptoms were more helpful for screening in children versus chest CT."
AUTHORS
Liu H
Zhang T
Wang D
Liu F
Li J
Lan W
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Infection
High quality source
Yes
Yes
6
Clinical analysis of 31 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus infection in children from six provinces (autonomous region) of northern China
"Objective: To analyze the epidemiological history, clinical manifestations, treatment and the short-term prognosis of 31 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus(2019-nCoV) infection in children from six provinces (autonomous region) in northern China. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the epidemiological history, clinical symptoms, signs, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, treatment and the short-term prognosis of 31 cases of 2019-nCoV was conducted. The patients were diagnosed between January 25th, 2020 and February 21st, 2020 in 21 hospitals in 17 cities of six provinces(autonomous region) of Shaanxi, Gansu, Ningxia, Hebei, Henan and Shandong. Results: The age of the 31 children with 2019-nCoV infection was 7 years and 1 month (6 months -17 years). Nine cases (29%) were imported cases. Other 21 cases (68%) had contact with confirmed infected adults. One case (3%) had contact with asymptomatic returnees from Wuhan. Among the 31 children, 28 patients (90%) were family cluster cases. The clinical types were asymptomatic type in 4 cases (13%), mild type in 13 cases (42%), and common type in 14 cases (45%). No severe or critical type existed. The most common symptom was fever (n=20, 65%), including 1 case of high fever, 9 cases of moderate fever, 10 cases of low fever. Fever lasted from 1 day to 9 days. The fever of fifteen cases lasted for ≤3 d, while in other 5 cases lasted > 3 d. Other symptoms included cough (n=14, 45%), fatigue (n=3, 10%) and diarrhea (n=3, 9%). Pharyngalgia, runny nose, dizziness, headache and vomiting were rare. In the early stage, the total leukocytes count in peripheral blood decreased in 2 cases (6%), the lymphocytes count decreased in 2 cases (6%), and the platelet count increased in 2 cases (6%).Elevation of C-reactive protein (10%, 3/30), erythrocyte sedimentation rate(19%,4/21), procalcitonin(4%,1/28), liver enzyme(22%, 6/27) and muscle enzyme (15%, 4/27) occurred in different proportions. Renal function and blood glucose were normal. There were abnormal chest CT changes in 14 cases, including 9 cases with patchy ground glass opacities and nodules, mostly located in the lower lobe of both lungs near the pleural area. After receiving supportive treatment, the viral nucleic acid turned negative in 25 cases within 7-23 days. Among them, 24 children (77%) recovered and were discharged from hospital. No death occurred. Conclusions: In this case series, 2019-nCoV infections in children from six provinces (autonomous region) in northern China are mainly caused by close family contact. Clinical types are asymptomatic, mild and common types. Clinical manifestations and laboratory examination results are nonspecific. Close contact history of epidemiology, nucleic acid detection and chest imaging are important bases for diagnosis. After general treatment, the short-term prognosis is good."
AUTHORS
Wang D
Li FY
Xie F
Ju XL
Lu Y
PUBLISHED
2020 in Chinese Journal of Pediatrics
UNRANKED SOURCE
Yes
Yes
7
Clinical and CT features in pediatric patients with COVID-19 infection: Different points from adults.
"PURPOSE:To discuss the different characteristics of clinical, laboratory, and chest computed tomography (CT) in pediatric patients from adults with 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection.METHODS:The clinical, laboratory, and chest CT features of 20 pediatric inpatients with COVID-19 infection confirmed by pharyngeal swab COVID-19 nucleic acid test were retrospectively analyzed during 23 January and 8 February 2020. The clinical and laboratory information was obtained from inpatient records. All the patients were undergone chest CT in our hospital.RESULTS:Thirteen pediatric patients (13/20, 65%) had an identified history of close contact with COVID-19 diagnosed family members. Fever (12/20, 60%) and cough (13/20, 65%) were the most common symptoms. For laboratory findings, procalcitonin elevation (16/20, 80%) should be pay attention to, which is not common in adults. Coinfection (8/20, 40%) is common in pediatric patients. A total of 6 patients presented with unilateral pulmonary lesions (6/20, 30%), 10 with bilateral pulmonary lesions (10/20, 50%), and 4 cases showed no abnormality on chest CT (4/20, 20%). Consolidation with surrounding halo sign was observed in 10 patients (10/20, 50%), ground-glass opacities were observed in 12 patients (12/20, 60%), fine mesh shadow was observed in 4 patients (4/20, 20%), and tiny nodules were observed in 3 patients (3/20, 15%).CONCLUSION:Procalcitonin elevation and consolidation with surrounding halo signs were common in pediatric patients which were different from adults. It is suggested that underlying coinfection may be more common in pediatrics, and the consolidation with surrounding halo sign which is considered as a typical sign in pediatric patients."
AUTHORS
Hu D
Guo Y
Li Z
Shao J
Xia W
Peng X
PUBLISHED
2020 in Pediatric Pulmonology
High quality source
Couldn't Identify
Couldn't Identify
8
Chest computed tomography in children with COVID-19 respiratory infection.
"BACKGROUND:Infection with COVID-19 is currently rare in children.OBJECTIVE:To describe chest CT findings in children with COVID-19.MATERIALS AND METHODS:We studied children at a large tertiary-care hospital in China, during the period from 28 January 2019 to 8 February 2020, who had positive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for COVID-19. We recorded findings at any chest CT performed in the included children, along with core clinical observations.RESULTS:We included five children from 10 months to 6 years of age (mean 3.4 years). All had had at least one CT scan after admission. Three of these five had CT abnormality on the first CT scan (at 2 days, 4 days and 9 days, respectively, after onset of symptoms) in the form of patchy ground-glass opacities; all normalised during treatment.CONCLUSION:Compared to reports in adults, we found similar but more modest lung abnormalities at CT in our small paediatric cohort."
AUTHORS
Li S
Li W
Fang Y
Li K
Cui H
PUBLISHED
2020 in Pediatric Radiology
Q2
Yes
Yes
9
A 55-Day-Old Female Infant infected with COVID 19: presenting with pneumonia, liver injury, and heart damage.
"Previous studies on the pneumonia outbreak caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) were mainly based on information from adult populations. Limited data are available for children with COVID-19, especially for infected infants. We report a 55-day-old case with COVID-19 confirmed in China and describe the identification, diagnosis, clinical course, and treatment of the patient, including the disease progression from day 7 to day 11 of illness. This case highlights that children with COVID-19 can also present with multiple organ damage and rapid disease changes. When managing such patients, frequent and careful clinical monitoring is essential."
AUTHORS
Cui Y
Tian M
Huang D
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Infectious Diseases
High quality source
FUNDERS
National Natural Science Foundation of Guizhou people’s Hospital
No
No
10
Clinical features of pediatric patients with COVID-19: a report of two family cluster cases.
"BACKGROUND:Coronovirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the globe. People of all ages are susceptible to COVID-19. However, literature reports on pediatric patients are limited.METHODS:To improve the recognition of COVID-19 infection in children, we retrospectively reviewed two confirmed pediatric cases from two family clusters. Both clinical features and laboratory examination results of the children and their family members were described.RESULTS:The two confirmed children only presented with mild respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. Both of them had normal chest CT images. After general and symptomatic treatments, both children recovered quickly. Both families had travel histories to Hubei Province.CONCLUSIONS:Pediatric patients with COVID-19 are mostly owing to family cluster or with a close contact history. Infected children have relatively milder clinical symptoms than infected adults. We should attach importance to early recognition, early diagnosis, and early treatment of infected children."
AUTHORS
Ji LN
Wang YJ
Chao S
Jiang RM
Lin MG
Mu XD et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in World Journal of Pediatrics
Q2
Yes
Yes







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
Total additional studies: 52
State of K's algorithms generated the list of studies below based on the studies that were added to the above list. Some of these studies may also examine: "Do adults get sick from COVID-19 more often than children?" If a study examines this question, add it to the list by pressing the button.

Only add studies that examine the same question. Do not add studies that are merely on the same topic.

COVID-19 in children: More than meets the eye
You can view the abstract at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2020.101649
AUTHOR
Stefan H.F. Hagmann
PUBLISHED
2020 in Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

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A Mini Review on Current Clinical and Research Findings for Children Suffering from COVID-19
"Background: As the novel coronavirus triggering COVID-19 has broken out in Wuhan, China and spread rapidly worldwide, it threatens the lives of thousands of people and poses a global threat on the economies of the entire world. However, infection with COVID-19 is currently rare in children.
Objective To discuss the latest findings and research focus on the basis of characteristics of children confirmed with COVID-19, and provide an insight into the future treatment and research direction.

Methods: We searched the terms "COVID-19 OR coronavirus OR SARS-CoV-2" AND "Pediatric OR children" on PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, NIH, CDC, and CNKI. The authors also reviewed the guidelines published on Chinese CDC and Chinese NHC.

Results: We included 25 published literature references related to the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, accessary examination, treatment, and prognosis of pediatric patients with COVID-19.

Conclusion: The numbers of children with COVID‐19 pneumonia infection are small, and most of them come from family aggregation. Symptoms are mainly mild or even asymptomatic, which allow children to be a risk factor for transmission. Thus, strict epidemiological history screening is needed for early diagnosis and segregation. This holds especially for infants, who are more susceptible to infection than other age groups in pediatric age, but have most likely subtle and unspecific symptoms. They need to be paid more attention to. CT examination is a necessity for screening the suspected cases, because most of the pediatric patients are mild cases, and plain chest X-ray do not usually show the lesions or the detailed features. Therefore, early chest CT examination combined with pathogenic detection is a recommended clinical diagnosis scheme in children. The risk factors which may suggest severe or critical progress for children are: Fast respiratory rate and/or; lethargy and drowsiness mental state and/or; lactate progressively increasing and/or; imaging showed bilateral or multi lobed infiltration, pleural effusion or rapidly expending of lesions in a short period of time and/or; less than 3 months old or those who underly diseases. For those critical pediatric patients with positive SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis, polypnea may be the most common symptom. For treatment, the elevated PCT seen in children in contrast to adults suggests that the underlying coinfection/secondary infection may be more common in pediatric patients and appropriate antibacterial treatment should be considered. Once cytokine storm is found in these patients, anti-autoimmune or blood-purifying therapy should be given in time. Furthermore, effective isolation measures and appropriate psychological comfort need to be provided timely."
AUTHORS
Xiao Li
Min Cheng
Bjoern W. Schuller
Xiu-juan Li
Kun Qian
Ling-ling Xie et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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[Adopted children are more often sick].
You can view the abstract at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7826771
AUTHOR
K A Bakke
PUBLISHED
1994 in Journalen sykepleien

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Hundreds of severe pediatric COVID-19 infections in Wuhan prior to the lockdown
"Before January 22, 2020, only one pediatric case of COVID-19 was reported in mainland China. However, a retrospective surveillance study identified six children who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 in one of three central Wuhan hospitals between January 7th and January 15th. Given that Wuhan has over 395 other hospitals, there may have been far more severe pediatric cases than reported. There were six and 43 children out of 336 who tested positive for COVID-19 and influenza, respectively among all pediatric admissions during the 9-day period. By using this ratio in a detailed analysis of influenza surveillance data and COVID-19 epidemic dynamics (see Appendix), we estimate that there were 313 [95% CI: 171-520] children hospitalized for COVID-19 in Wuhan during January 7-15, 2020 (Figure). Under an epidemic doubling time of 7.31 days4, we estimate that there were 1105 [95% CI: 592, 1829] cumulative pediatric COVID-19 hospitalizations prior to the January 23rd lockdown, which far surpasses the 425 confirmed cases reported across all age groups, none of which were children under age 15. Children are strikingly absent from COVID-19 reports and limited data suggest that pediatric infections are overwhelmingly mild5. Thus, our estimates for hundreds of severe pediatric cases likely translates to thousands or even tens of thousands of mildly infected children, suggesting that the force of infection from children may be grossly underestimated and the infection fatality rate overestimated from confirmed case counts alone. This highlights the urgent need for more robust surveillance to gauge the true extent and severity of COVID-19 in all ages."
AUTHORS
Lauren Ancel Meyers
Ciara Nugent
Zhanwei Du
Benjamin J Cowling
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Getting ready for the next pandemic COVID-19: Why we need to be more prepared and less scared
"As of March 2020, we are almost at the three-month mark of COVID-19 with 90,663 reported cases worldwide and 3,124 reported deaths spread over six continents and 67 countries. As of March 3, 2020, the United States announced its six COVID-19-related deaths with 103 confirmed cases spread throughout fourteen states.1 It is important to note, however, that even as the number of reported cases and deaths continue to increase, the COVID-19 overall case fatality rate thus far stands at 3.4 percent. It is important to keep in mind that case fatality rates will also vary by age group and geographic areas. Government leaders and health experts have repeatedly mentioned that it is expected that COVID-19 cases would increase and that it would inevitably reach the United States. I would go even a step further to predict that there will be more confirmed cases and deaths in the United States as well as other parts of the world. Unfortunately and inevitably, by the time this editorial is published, the number of reported cases and deaths will have increased worldwide. If there is one thing to take from all of this information is that we are just at the beginning of the disease progression and more people will get infected and some additional people will also die. As a society, we need not be alarmed simply because it is a novel infectious disease. In the twentieth century, the world has experienced several novel diseases and even pandemic-level diseases. The recent CDC announcement that COVID-19 may reach pandemic levels is not only expected but also scientifically accurate when it comes to normal disease progression. Such announcements should not surprise the public and it should also not instill panic. What the world and the United States need to do is get better prepared. I understand that the fear of the unknown can be daunting but we need to recall that we (the US and the world) have been through similar experiences and survived."
AUTHOR
George W. Contreras, DrPH(c), MEP, MPH, MS, CEM
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Emergency Management

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Going Digital as a Necessity: Ensuring Older Adults’ Needs for Health Information, Services, and Social Inclusion During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Preprint)
"
UNSTRUCTURED
During pandemics like COVID-19, going digital is, more than ever, a necessity. However, going digital alone is insufficient for reaching vulnerable populations like older adults. Older adults are in triple jeopardy during COVID-19: compared with younger people, older adults are (1) more likely to develop serious conditions and experience higher mortality; (2) less likely to obtain high quality information or services online; and (3) more likely to experience social isolation and loneliness. Hybrid informatics solutions, coupling online and offline strategies, are invaluable in ensuring the inclusion of vulnerable populations during pandemics. Most of these solutions do not require new inventions or technology. Finding the financial resources for a rapid, well-coordinated implementation is the biggest challenge. Setting up the systems and digital infrastructure is important for the present and future pandemics.
"
AUTHOR
Bo Xie
PUBLISHED
2020 in JMIR Publications Inc.

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Literature review
Clinical Manifestations of Children with COVID-19: a Systematic Review
"Context: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is an unprecedented global public health challenge, leading to thousands of deaths every day worldwide. Despite the epidemiological importance, clinical patterns of children with COVID-19 remain unclear.
Objective: To describe the clinical, laboratorial and radiological characteristics of children with COVID-19.
Data Sources: The Medline database was searched between December 1st 2019 and March 30th 2020.
Study Selection: Inclusion criteria were: (1) studied patients younger than 18 years old; (2) presented original data from cases of COVID-19 confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction; and (3) contained descriptions of clinical manifestations, laboratory tests or radiological examinations.
Data Extraction: Number of cases, gender, age, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, radiological examinations and outcomes.
Results: A total of 34 studies (1,118 cases) were included. From all the cases, 1,111 had their severity classified: 14.3% were asymptomatic, 36.4% were mild, 46.0% were moderate, 2.2% were severe and 1.2% were critical. The most prevalent symptom was fever (16.3%), followed by cough (14.4%), nasal symptoms (3.6%), diarrhea (2.7%) and nausea/vomiting (2.5%). One hundred forty-five (12.9%) children were diagnosed with pneumonia and 43 (3.8%) upper airway infections were reported. Reduced lymphocyte count were reported in 13.1% of cases. Abnormalities on computed tomography was reported in 62.7% of cases. The most prevalent abnormalities reported were ground glass opacities, patchy shadows and consolidations. Only one death was reported.
Conclusions: Clinical manifestations of children with COVID-19 differ widely from adults cases. Fever and respiratory symptoms should not be considered a hallmark of COVID-19 in children."
AUTHORS
Marcelo Barciela Brandao
Ricardo Mendes Pereira
Roberto Jose Negrao Nogueira
Jose Antonio Nadal
Tiago Henrique de Souza
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Prevention and control strategies for emergency, limited-term, and elective operations in pediatric surgery during the epidemic period of COVID-19
"The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread to more than 100 countries. Children approved to be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Preventing and controlling the epidemic while ensuring orderly flows of pediatric surgery clinical work has proven to be a big challenge for both patients and clinicians during the epidemic. Based on the transmission characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 and the requirements for prevention and control of COVID-19, the authors proposed some concrete measures and practical strategies of managing emergency, limited-term, and elective pediatric surgeries during the epidemic period."
AUTHORS
Dongyan Zhao
Qingjiang Chen
Jia Wei
Zheming Xu
Hangyan Zhao
Jinfa Tou et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in World Journal of Pediatric Surgery

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Sitagliptin: a potential drug for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2?
"Recently, an outbreak of fatal coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has emerged from China and is rapidly spreading worldwide. As the coronavirus pandemic rages, drug discovery and development become even more challenging. Drug repurposing of the antimalarial drug chloroquine and its hydroxylated form had demonstrated apparent effectiveness in the treatment of COVID-19 associated pneumonia in clinical trials. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein shares 31.9% sequence identity with the spike protein presents in the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus (MERS-CoV), which infects cells through the interaction of its spike protein with the DPP4 receptor found on macrophages. Sitagliptin, a DPP4 inhibitor, that is known for its antidiabetic, immunoregulatory, anti-inflammatory, and beneficial cardiometabolic effects has been shown to reverse macrophage responses in MERS-CoV infection and reduce CXCL10 chemokine production in AIDS patients. We suggest that Sitagliptin may be beneficial alternative for the treatment of COVID-19 disease especially in diabetic patients and patients with preexisting cardiovascular conditions who are already at higher risk of COVID-19 infection."
AUTHOR
Sanaa Bardaweel
PUBLISHED
2020 in Center for Open Science

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Sitagliptin: a potential drug for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2?
"Recently, an outbreak of fatal coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has emerged from China and is rapidly spreading worldwide. As the coronavirus pandemic rages, drug discovery and development become even more challenging. Drug repurposing of the antimalarial drug chloroquine and its hydroxylated form had demonstrated apparent effectiveness in the treatment of COVID-19 associated pneumonia in clinical trials. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein shares 31.9% sequence identity with the spike protein presents in the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus (MERS-CoV), which infects cells through the interaction of its spike protein with the DPP4 receptor found on macrophages. Sitagliptin, a DPP4 inhibitor, that is known for its antidiabetic, immunoregulatory, anti-inflammatory, and beneficial cardiometabolic effects has been shown to reverse macrophage responses in MERS-CoV infection and reduce CXCL10 chemokine production in AIDS patients. We suggest that Sitagliptin may be beneficial alternative for the treatment of COVID-19 disease especially in diabetic patients and patients with preexisting cardiovascular conditions who are already at higher risk of COVID-19 infection."
AUTHOR
Sanaa Bardaweel
PUBLISHED
2020 in Center for Open Science

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Lactoferrin as potential preventative and treatment for COVID-19
"The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is rapidly advancing across the globe despite public and personal health measures. Antivirals and nutritional supplements have been proposed as potentially useful against SARS-CoV-2 (virus that causes COVID-19), but few have been clinically established. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a naturally occurring and non-toxic glycoprotein that is orally available as a nutritional supplement and has established in vitro anti-viral efficacy against a wide range of virus including SARS-CoV, a closely related corona virus to SARS-CoV-2 (virus that causes COVID-19). Furthermore, Lf possesses unique immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects that maybe especially relevant to the pathophysiology of severe COVID-19 cases. We review the underlying biological mechanisms of Lf as antiviral and immune regulator, and propose its unique potential as preventative and adjunct treatment for COVID-19. We hope that further research and development of Lf nutritional supplementation would establish its role for COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Wei-Zen Sun
Raymond Chang
Tzi Bun Ng
PUBLISHED
2020 in Center for Open Science

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When Darkness Becomes a Ray of Light in the Dark Times: Understanding the COVID-19 via the Comparative Analysis of the Dark Proteomes of SARS-CoV-2, Human SARS and Bat SARS-Like Coronaviruses
"AbstractRecently emerged coronavirus designated as SARS-CoV-2 (also known as 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) or Wuhan coronavirus) is a causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is rapidly spreading throughout the world now. More than 9,00,000 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection and more than 47,000 COVID-19-associated mortalities have been reported worldwide till the writing of this article, and these numbers are increasing every passing hour. World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the SARS-CoV-2 spread as a global public health emergency and admitted that the COVID-19 is a pandemic now. The multiple sequence alignment data correlated with the already published reports on the SARS-CoV-2 evolution and indicated that this virus is closely related to the bat Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-like coronavirus (bat SARS-like CoV) and the well-studied Human SARS coronavirus (SARS CoV). The disordered regions in viral proteins are associated with the viral infectivity and pathogenicity. Therefore, in this study, we have exploited a set of complementary computational approaches to examine the dark proteomes of SARS-CoV-2, bat SARS-like, and human SARS CoVs by analysing the prevalence of intrinsic disorder in their proteins. According to our findings, SARS-CoV-2 proteome contains very significant levels of structural order. In fact, except for Nucleocapsid, Nsp8, and ORF6, the vast majority of SARS-CoV-2 proteins are mostly ordered proteins containing less intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs). However, IDPRs found in SARS-CoV-2 proteins are functionally important. For example, cleavage sites in its replicase 1ab polyprotein are found to be highly disordered, and almost all SARS-CoV-2 proteins were shown to contain molecular recognition features (MoRFs), which are intrinsic disorder-based protein-protein interaction sites that are commonly utilized by proteins for interaction with specific partners. The results of our extensive investigation of the dark side of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome will have important implications for the structural and non-structural biology of SARS or SARS-like coronaviruses.SignificanceThe infection caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that causes severe respiratory disease with pneumonia-like symptoms in humans is responsible for the current COVID-19 pandemic. No in-depth information on structures and functions of SARS-CoV-2 proteins is currently available in the public domain, and no effective anti-viral drugs and/or vaccines are designed for the treatment of this infection. Our study provides the first comparative analysis of the order- and disorder-based features of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome relative to human SARS and bat CoV that may be useful for structure-based drug discovery."
AUTHORS
Rajanish Giri
Christopher J. Oldfield
Kundlik Gadhave
Bhuvaneshwari R. Gehi
Meenakshi Shegane
Taniya Bhardwaj et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Molecular Evolutionary Analysis, Global Burden and Possible Threat to Bangladesh
"Abstract

Recently a new coronavirus strain, COVID-19 has emerged in Wuhan City, China which cause disease and in many cases deaths to humans. Considering its severity a number of works are working on it and full genomic sequences has already released in the last few weeks to understand the evolutionary origin and molecular characteristics of this virus. Based on currently available genomic information a phylogenetic tree was constructed from four types of representative viral proteins (Spike, Membrane, Envelope and Nucleoproetin) of COVID-19, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, SARS-CoV, HCoV-NL63, HKU1, MERS-CoV, HKU4, HKU5 and BufCoV-HKU26 clearly demonstrated that the ancestral origin and distant evolutionary relation of newly epidemic novel coronavirus (COVID-19). It had been found that COVID-19 was evolutionary related to SARS-CoV. It was also found that COVID-19 proteins were almost more than ninety (90%) similar and identical with SARS-CoV proteins. The cross-checked conservancy analysis of COVID-19 antigenic epitopes showed significant conservancy with SARS-CoV proteins. VaxiJen server reveal almost 100% immunogenic potential of four viral proteins with COVID-19. In this article, we present an effort on molecular evolutionary analysis, temperature comparison and compile and analyze epidemiological outbreak information on the 2019 novel coronavirus based on the several open datasets on COVID-19 (SARS-COV-2) and possible threat to Bangladesh.Authors Md Bashir Uddin and Mahmudul Hasan contributed equally to this work
"
AUTHORS
Syed Sayeem Uddin Ahmed
Md. Abdus Shukur Imran
Md. Irtija Ahsan
Mahmudul Hasan
Ahmed Harun-Al-Rashid
Md Bashir Uddin
PUBLISHED
2020 in Research Square

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In search of feasible interventions for the prevention and cure of novel Coronavirus disease 2019
"COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is a public health emergency of international concern caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). As of this time, there is no known effective pharmaceutical, phytopharmaceutical or traditional medicine for cure or prevention of COVID-19, although it is urgently needed. Based on the current understanding of the disease molecular mechanisms from the closest relatives of SARS-CoV-2 as well as novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, I attempt to translate this knowledge into identifying some naturally occurring plant based substances and Ayurvedic medicinal herbs that could feasibly be used as preventive as well as treatment options for COVID-19."
AUTHOR
Sunil Verma
PUBLISHED
2020 in Center for Open Science

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Literature review
COVID-19: A Review on Molecular Basis, Pathogenic Mechanisms, Therapeutic Aspects and Future Projections
"The SARS-CoV-2 is a recently identified positive sense single stranded RNA virus and member of the coronavirus family of viruses. It is thought to be the etiological factor for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This virus is thought to have originated from bats and acquired ability of human-to-human transmission. While SARS-CoV-2 is relatively benign, it has infected more than half a million people (as of March 29th 2020) worldwide and the number of infected people continues to rise. More than 170 countries have reported COVID-19 positive cases. With a mortality rate of less than both the previous coronavirus outbreaks, COVID-19 has (conversely) caused the death of over 33,980 (as of 29th March, 2020 at 22.00 hours EDT) people worldwide and the number is increasing. Given the enormous impact of this virus on human health and wellbeing and consequent devastating impacts on world trade, economics and quality of life, it is important to understand this virus better and get insight into its pathogenic mechanisms which will aid in devising effective measure to curb its spread and predict future pattern of its interaction with humans. Though very little is known about this SARS-CoV-2 but its mechanisms and patterns of spread can be speculated (with caution, nevertheless) from what we know about its closest relatives SARS-CoV-1 (responsible for SARS-2002 epidemic) and MERS-CoV (responsible for MERS-2012 epidemic). In the present review, we aim at bringing together the coherent and peer reviewed literature about the SARS-CoV-2 and its close relatives and try to understand its infection patterns and reconstruct its pathogenic mechanisms with anecdotes on diagnosis and future directions. We hope that this paper will serve the purpose of being a reliable source of information to scientists, clinicians and general public."
AUTHORS
Khursheed Raza
Muneeb Faiq
Pavan Kumar
Rizwana Qadri
Himanshu Singh
Ashutosh Kumar et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in MDPI AG

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Prolonged presence of SARS-CoV-2 in feces of pediatric patients during the convalescent phase
"Background: Severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a newly identified virus which mainly spreads from person-to-person. Fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2 has been constantly reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Most published studies focus on adult populations, whereas data concerning pediatric patients is relatively scarce.
Methods: From January 17, 2020 to March 6, 2020, three pediatric cases of COVID-19 were reported in Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics and treatment data of these children were collected. Real-time fluorescence reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in throat swabs and fecal specimens.
Results: All the three pediatric cases were household contacts of adults whose symptoms developed earlier. There has been no evidence showing the virus was transmitted from the children to others. Severity of disease of these children was mild to moderate and fever was the most consistent and predominant symptom at onset of illness (two cases had body temperature higher than 38.5 Celsius). All children showed increased lymphocytes (&gt;4.4*109/L) with normal white blood cell counts on admission. One child had elevated serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reaction protein. Radiological changes were not typical for COVID-19. All children showed good response to supportive treatment. Clearance of SARS-CoV-2 in respiratory tract occurred within two weeks after abatement of fever, whereas persistent presence of viral RNA was found in stools of all children. One case had fecal SARS-CoV-2 turned negative 8 days after throat swabs showing negative, while that of another child lagged behind for 20 days. At the time of writing, one child still had positive results for RT-PCR analysis in stools after negative conversion of viral RNA in respiratory samples (over 19 days behind).
Conclusions: Pediatric patients with COVID-19 are very different from adult patients in regards to epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics. Prolonged shedding of SARS-CoV-2 in stools of infected children indicates the potential for the virus to be transmitted through fecal excretion. Massive efforts should be made at all levels to prevent spreading of the infection among children after reopening of kindergartens and schools."
AUTHORS
Guoju Li
Wenjie Li
Xiufeng Song
Quansheng Xing
Qin Wu
Yuhan Xing et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Viral Architecture of SARS-CoV-2 with Post-Fusion Spike Revealed by Cryo-EM
"AbstractSince December 2019, the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) spread from Wuhan, China to the world, it has caused more than 87,000 diagnosed cases and more than 3,000 deaths globally. To fight against COVID-19, we carried out research for the near native SARS-CoV-2 and report here our preliminary results obtained. The pathogen of the COVID-19, the native SARS-CoV-2, was isolated, amplified and purified in a BSL-3 laboratory. The whole viral architecture of SARS-CoV-2 was examined by transmission electron microscopy (both negative staining and cryo-EM). We observed that the virion particles are roughly spherical or moderately pleiomorphic. Spikes have nail-like shape towards outside with a long body embedded in the envelope. The morphology of virion observed in our result indicates that the S protein of SARS-CoV-2 is in post-fusion state, with S1 disassociated. This state revealed by cryo-EM first time could provide an important information for the identification and relevant clinical research of this new coronavirus."
AUTHORS
Xiaomin Ma
Weilong Liu
Jing Wu
Jing Yuan
Yuanzhu Gao
Shuman Xu et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Children — United States, February 12–April 2, 2020
"As of April 2, 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in >890,000 cases and >45,000 deaths worldwide, including 239,279 cases and 5,443 deaths in the United States (1,2). In the United States, 22% of the population is made up of infants, children, and adolescents aged <18 years (children) (3). Data from China suggest that pediatric COVID-19 cases might be less severe than cases in adults and that children might experience different symptoms than do adults (4,5); however, disease characteristics among pediatric patients in the United States have not been described. Data from 149,760 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States occurring during February 12-April 2, 2020 were analyzed. Among 149,082 (99.6%) reported cases for which age was known, 2,572 (1.7%) were among children aged <18 years. Data were available for a small proportion of patients on many important variables, including symptoms (9.4%), underlying conditions (13%), and hospitalization status (33%). Among those with available information, 73% of pediatric patients had symptoms of fever, cough, or shortness of breath compared with 93% of adults aged 18-64 years during the same period; 5.7% of all pediatric patients, or 20% of those for whom hospitalization status was known, were hospitalized, lower than the percentages hospitalized among all adults aged 18-64 years (10%) or those with known hospitalization status (33%). Three deaths were reported among the pediatric cases included in this analysis. These data support previous findings that children with COVID-19 might not have reported fever or cough as often as do adults (4). Whereas most COVID-19 cases in children are not severe, serious COVID-19 illness resulting in hospitalization still occurs in this age group. Social distancing and everyday preventive behaviors remain important for all age groups as patients with less serious illness and those without symptoms likely play an important role in disease transmission (6,7)."
AUTHORS
Tami Skoff
Tamara Pilishvili
Lucy A. McNamara
Michelle Hughes
Ryan Gierke
Stephanie Bialek et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report

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Literature review
Potential Effectiveness and Safety of Antiviral Agents in Children with Coronavirus Disease 2019: A Rapid Review and Meta-Analysis
"Background: The COVID-19 outbreak presents a new, life-threatening disease. Our aim was to assess the potential effectiveness and safety of antiviral agents for COVID-19 in children.
Methods: Electronic databases from their inception to March, 31 2020 were searched for randomized controlled trials, clinical controlled trials and cohort studies of interventions with antiviral agents for children (less than 18 years of age) with COVID-19.
Results: A total of 23 studies of indirect evidence with 6008 patients were included. The risks of bias in all studies were moderate to high in general. The effectiveness and safety of antiviral agents for children with COVID-19 is uncertain: For adults with COVID-19, lopinavir/ritonavir had no effect on mortality (risk ratio [RR]= 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 1.30) and probability of negative PCR test (RR=0.98, 95 CI% 0.82 to 1.18). Arbidol had no benefit on probability of negative PCR test (RR=1.27, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.73). Hydroxychloroquine was not associated with increasing the probability of negative PCR result (RR=0.93, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.18). For adults with SARS, interferon was associated with reduced corticosteroid dose (weighted mean difference [WMD]=-0.14 g, 95% CI -0.21 to -0.07) but had no effect on mortality (RR=0.72, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.88); ribavirin did not reduce mortality (RR=0.68, 95% CI % 0.43 to 1.06) and was associated with high risk of severe adverse reactions; and oseltamivir had no effect on mortality (RR=0.87, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.38). Ribavirin combined with interferon was also not effective in adults with MERS and associated with adverse reactions.
Conclusions: There is no evidence showing the effectiveness of antiviral agents for children with COVID-19, and the clinical efficacy of existing antiviral agents is still uncertain. We do not suggest clinical routine use of antivirals for COVID-19 in children, with the exception of clinical trials.
Keywords: Antiviral agents; children; COVID-19; meta-analysis; rapid review."
AUTHORS
Zijun Wang
Qubei Li
Enmei Liu
Myeong Soo Lee
Qi Zhou
Yang Yu et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Using Reports of Own and Others’ Symptoms and Diagnosis on Social Media to Predict COVID-19 Case Counts: Observational Study in Mainland China (Preprint)
"
BACKGROUND
COVID-19 has already affected more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. It poses an extraordinary challenge for public health systems, because screening and surveillance capacity—especially during the beginning of the outbreak—is often severely limited, fueling the outbreak as many patients unknowingly infect others.


OBJECTIVE
We present an effort to collect and analyze COVID-19 related posts on the popular Twitter-like social media site in China, Weibo. To our knowledge, this is the first study that examines comprehensive and fine-grained social media data to predict COVID-19 case counts in mainland China.


METHODS
Using a comprehensive list of 167 keywords, we retrieved and analyzed more than 12 million COVID-19 related posts, from November 20, 2019 to March 3, 2020. We developed a machine learning classifier to identify “sick posts,” which are reports of one’s own and other people’s symptoms and diagnosis related to COVID-19. Using officially reported case counts as the outcome, we then modeled the predictive power of sick posts and other COVID-19 posts on daily case counts. For a subset of geotagged posts (2.85% of all retrieved posts), we also ran separate predictive models for Hubei province, the epicenter of the initial outbreak, and the rest of mainland China.


RESULTS
We found that reports of symptoms and diagnosis of COVID-19 significantly predicted daily case counts, up to seven days ahead of official statistics. But other COVID-19 posts did not have similar predictive power. For the subset of geotagged posts, we found that the predictive pattern held true for both Hubei province and the rest of mainland China, regardless of unequal distribution of healthcare resources and outbreak timeline.


CONCLUSIONS
Public social media data can be usefully harnessed to predict infection cases and inform timely responses. Researchers and disease control agencies should pay close attention to the social media infosphere regarding COVID-19. On top of monitoring overall search and posting activities, it is crucial to sift through the contents and efficiently identify true signals from noise.
"
AUTHORS
Chen Luo
Jingwen Zhang
Wang Liao
Bo Feng
Anfan Chen
Cuihua Shen
PUBLISHED
2020 in JMIR Publications Inc.

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Why Infants Rarely Die of COVID-19 and Morbidity and Mortality Rates Vary by Location: Pneumococcal and Hib Vaccinations as Possible Means to Mitigate Future Pandemics
"Two conundrums have puzzled COVID-19 investigators: 1) morbidity and mortality is rare among Infants and young children and 2) rates of morbidity and mortality exhibit very large variances across nations, locals and even within cities. These differences correlate with rates of Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) and pneumococcal vaccination, which are almost universal among infants and vary widely by geography among adults and the elderly. The higher the rate of vaccination, the lower the COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. Vaccination rates with other vaccines, including BCG, do not correlate with COVID-19 risks. Notably, both Hib and pneumoccoci are common co-infections with influenza and coronaviruses and are associated with more severe disease and risk of death. Whether the vaccines simply protect against COVID-19 complications, directly protect against COVID-19 infection by inducing cross-reactive immunity, or are markers for some other types of protection such as availability of better healthcare, is not yet known. What is known is that improving coverage rates of Hib and pneumococcal vaccination has significantly lowered severe morbidity and mortality in influenza epidemics and might have similar efficacy for mitigating coronavirus outbreaks. If infants and children are valid indicators, the beneficial effects might be very significant."
AUTHOR
Robert Root-Bernstein
PUBLISHED
2020 in MDPI AG

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A child confirmed COVID-19 with only symptoms of conjunctivitis and eyelid dermatitis
"Abstract
The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection in China had quickly spread worldwide. Recent reports showed that conjunctivitis symptoms were found in a small number of adult patients diagnosed with COVID-19. But rare children diagnosed with COVID-19 were reported to have eye symptoms. Our case showed a 2 years and 10 months old child confirmed COVID-19 had no symptoms other than conjunctivitis and eyelid dermatitis, suggesting that doctors shouldn’t forget to conduct COVID-19 screening when children come to hospital for ocular surface symptoms during this epidemic period."
AUTHORS
ShengQiong Nie
ChunBao Chen
liang liang
Ping Wu
Jun Yang
PUBLISHED
2020 in Research Square

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Highly regarded source
Review article: gastrointestinal features in COVID-19 and the possibility of faecal transmission
"Background: There is little published evidence on the gastrointestinal features of COVID-19.

Aims: To report on the gastrointestinal manifestations and pathological findings of patients with COVID-19, and to discuss the possibility of faecal transmission.

Methods: We have reviewed gastrointestinal features of, and faecal test results in, COVID-19 from case reports and retrospective clinical studies relating to the digestive system published since the outbreak.

Results: With an incidence of 3% (1/41)-79% (159/201), gastrointestinal symptoms of COVID-19 included anorexia 39.9% (55/138)-50.2% (101/201), diarrhoea 2% (2/99)-49.5% (146/295), vomiting 3.6% (5/138)-66.7% (4/6), nausea 1% (1/99)-29.4% (59/201), abdominal pain 2.2% (3/138)-6.0% (12/201) and gastrointestinal bleeding 4% (2/52)-13.7% (10/73). Diarrhoea was the most common gastrointestinal symptom in children and adults, with a mean duration of 4.1 ± 2.5 days, and was observed before and after diagnosis. Vomiting was more prominent in children. About 3.6% (5/138)-15.9% (32/201) of adult and 6.5% (2/31)-66.7% (4/6) of children patients presented vomiting. Adult and children patients can present with digestive symptoms in the absence of respiratory symptoms. The incidence of digestive manifestations was higher in the later than in the early stage of the epidemic, but no differences in digestive symptoms among different regions were found. Among the group of patients with a higher proportion of severe cases, the proportion of gastrointestinal symptoms in severe patients was higher than that in nonsevere patients (anorexia 66.7% vs 30.4%; abdominal pain 8.3% vs 0%); while in the group of patients with a lower severe rate, the proportion with gastrointestinal symptoms was similar in severe and nonsevere cases (nausea and vomiting 6.9% vs 4.6%; diarrhoea 5.8% vs 3.5%). Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and virus nucleocapsid protein were detected in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, and infectious virus particles were isolated from faeces. Faecal PCR testing was as accurate as respiratory specimen PCR detection. In 36% (5/14)-53% (39/73) faecal PCR became positive, 2-5 days later than sputum PCR positive. Faecal excretion persisted after sputum excretion in 23% (17/73)-82% (54/66) patients for 1-11 days.

Conclusions: Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in patients with COVID-19, and had an increased prevalence in the later stage of the recent epidemic in China. SARS-CoV-2 enters gastrointestinal epithelial cells, and the faeces of COVID-19 patients are potentially infectious.

"
AUTHORS
Weidong Nian
Long Rong
Yan He
Yuan Tian
PUBLISHED
2020 in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

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Asymptomatic carrier state, acute respiratory disease, and pneumonia due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): Facts and myths
"Since the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (formerly known as the 2019 novel coronavirus [2019-nCoV]) in Wuhan, China in December 2019, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), more than 75,000 cases have been reported in 32 countries/regions, resulting in more than 2000 deaths worldwide. Despite the fact that most COVID-19 cases and mortalities were reported in China, the WHO has declared this outbreak as the sixth public health emergency of international concern. The COVID-19 can present as an asymptomatic carrier state, acute respiratory disease, and pneumonia. Adults represent the population with the highest infection rate; however, neonates, children, and elderly patients can also be infected by SARS-CoV-2. In addition, nosocomial infection of hospitalized patients and healthcare workers, and viral transmission from asymptomatic carriers are possible. The most common finding on chest imaging among patients with pneumonia was ground-glass opacity with bilateral involvement. Severe cases are more likely to be older patients with underlying comorbidities compared to mild cases. Indeed, age and disease severity may be correlated with the outcomes of COVID-19. To date, effective treatment is lacking; however, clinical trials investigating the efficacy of several agents, including remdesivir and chloroquine, are underway in China. Currently, effective infection control intervention is the only way to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2."
AUTHORS
Muh-Yen Yen
Shun-Chung Hsueh
Cheng-Yi Wang
Po-Ren Hsueh
Ya-Hui Wang
Chih-Cheng Lai et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection

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Human monoclonal antibodies block the binding of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor
"The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic of novel corona virus disease (COVID-19). To date, no prophylactic vaccines or approved therapeutic agents are available for preventing and treating this highly transmittable disease. Here we report two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) cloned from memory B cells of patients recently recovered from COVID-19, and both mAbs specifically bind to the spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2, block the binding of receptor binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 to human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (hACE2), and effectively neutralize S protein-pseudotyped virus infection. These human mAbs hold the promise for the prevention and treatment of the ongoing pandemic of COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Lilin Ye
Zhirong Li
Jianfang Tang
Xiangyu Chen
Zhaohui Qian
Yang Yang et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Characterization of Codon Usage Pattern in Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2
"Abstract
The outbreak of COVID-19 due to a novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has posed significant threats to international health. In this study we perform bioinformatic analysis to take a snapshot of the codon usage pattern of SARS-CoV-2 and uncover that this novel coronavirus has a relatively low codon usage bias. The information from this research may not only be helpful to get new insights into the evolution of SARS-CoV-2, but also have potential value for developing coronavirus vaccines."
AUTHOR
Wei Hou
PUBLISHED
2020 in Research Square

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Literature review
Novel Coronavirus: Current Understanding of Clinical Features, Diagnosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment Options
FUNDERS
American University of Sharjah
"Since December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in devastating consequences worldwide and infected more than 350,000 individuals and killed more than 16,000 people. SARS-CoV-2 is the seventh member of the coronavirus family to affect humans. Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever (88%), cough (68%), vomiting (5%) and diarrhoea (3.7%), and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is thought to occur from human to human via respiratory secretions released by the infected individuals when coughing and sneezing. COVID-19 can be detected through computed tomography scans and confirmed through molecular diagnostics tools such as polymerase chain reaction. Currently, there are no effective treatments against SARS-CoV-2, hence antiviral drugs have been used to reduce the development of respiratory complications by reducing viral load. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the pathogenesis, clinical aspects, diagnosis, challenges and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infections."
AUTHORS
Naveed Ahmed Khan
Mohammad Ridwane Mungroo
Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui
PUBLISHED
2020 in Pathogens

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Mutated COVID-19, May Foretells Mankind in a Great Risk in the Future
"Corona virus disease 2019 SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) is a zoonotic virus causing a variety of severe of respiratory diseases. SARS-CoV-2 is closest to SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV in structure. The highly prevalence of COVID-19 is due to the lack onset of symptoms. Our study aimed to present an overview of the virus in terms of structure, epidemiology, symptoms, treatment, and prevention. Conduct the differences of whole genome sequence and some viral proteins to determine the gap and the change alternation of nucleotides and amino acids sequences. We evaluate 11 complete genome sequence of different coronavirus using BAST and MAFFT software. We also selected 7 types of structural proteins. We were conclude that COVID-19 might be created new mutations specifically in glycoproteins hence requires caution and complete preparation by health authorities."
AUTHOR
Ali A. Dawood
PUBLISHED
2020 in New Microbes and New Infections

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COVID-19 in Children with Brain-Based Developmental Disabilities: A Rapid Review
"Background. The prevalence of symptomatic COVID-19 in children remains low to date. In just a few months, COVID-19 has affected millions of people worldwide, and as of the date of this publication, the pandemic continues. Based on the current available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk of contracting COVID-19 than adults. However, children with neurological and neuromuscular conditions are vulnerable to the respiratory complications of other viral infections. Objectives. To assess whether children with brain-based developmental disabilities were more likely to develop COVID-19 and have complications or poorer outcomes following infection. Methods. We conducted a two-week rapid review on studies with primary data regarding children aged between zero and 18 years old with brain-based developmental disabilities, or who were at risk of developing such disabilities, with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. We performed our literature searches on April 18, 2020. Results. Our search strategy identified 538 individual records, of which four were included in our review. Of the 50 COVID-19 pediatric patients reported in the included studies, a total of seven children were at risk of developing brain-based disabilities. Symptoms ranged in severity. However, generally, patients were discharged or saw improvements in their symptoms by the end of the study period. No deaths were reported. Discussion. Our study highlights a knowledge gap regarding the impact of COVID-19 in children with brain-based developmental disabilities."
AUTHORS
Benoit Mailot
Andree-Anne Poirier
Valerie Carnovale
Michele Dugas
Becky Skidmore
Annie LeBlanc et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Data Analysis of COVID-19 THE GREAT EPIDEMIC OF THE YEAR 2020 (Preprint)
"
UNSTRUCTURED
What is COVID-19, and how to deal with COVID-19 during pandemic. Does it is the result of harming nature? Mostly the disease was spread from Wuhan, China and is found bat to be the cause of spreading to other animals which has infected human. Italy, Spain and almost all the world is facing the consequence of COVID-19. In India where the prevalence rate of disease is 1.9% and 2.5% incidence rate, most of the cases are being found in Kerala and Maharashtra with updated data more than 200. Now the question arises is wet and cold climate making the virus spread and can the virus be killed in high temperature and high humidity? After Italy, China more death cases have been found in Spain. Data Science plays a major role by using machine learning to solve various problems and can be used to solve various problems associated with COVID-19. For example, prediction of how many peoples in groups will get effected, which location or area is likely to be get effected, screening of patients, using chat boots for concluding how many peoples have got the symptoms and are likely to be effected and so on.
In this paper we have tried to show which areas are more likely to be affected, how lockdown have helped in reduction of death and what in future we can do to not face such situation again in life.
"
AUTHOR
Sonia Singla
PUBLISHED
2020 in JMIR Publications Inc.

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Knowledge and attitude towards COVID-19 in Bangladesh: Population-level estimation and a comparison of data obtained by phone and online survey methods
"Adherence of people to the guidelines and measures suggested in fighting the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is partly determined by the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices (KAP) of the population. In this cross-sectional study, we primarily addressed two key issues. First, we tried to determine whether there is a significant difference in the estimated COVID-19 knowledge level from the online and phone survey methods. Second, we tried to quantify the knowledge and attitude of COVID-19 in Bangladeshi adult population. Data were collected through phone calls (April 14-23, 2020) and online survey (April 18-19, 2020) in Bangladesh. The questionnaire had 20 knowledge questions with each correct response getting one point and incorrect/do not know response getting no point (maximum total knowledge score 20). Participants scoring &gt;17 were categorized as having good knowledge. The percentages of good knowledge holders were 57.6%, 75.1%, and 95.8% in the phone (n=1426), online non-medical (n=1097), and online medical participants (n=382), respectively. Comparison between phone and online survey showed that, overall, online survey might overestimate knowledge level than that of phone survey, although there was no difference for elderly, poor, and rural people. Male gender, higher education, living in town/urban areas, good financial condition, and use of internet were positively associated with good knowledge. However, higher knowledge was associated with having less confidence in the final control of COVID-19. Our adult population-level estimates showed that only 32.6% (95% CI 30.1-35.2%) had good knowledge. This study provides crucial information that could be useful for the researchers and policymakers to develop effective strategies."
AUTHORS
Samira Hayee
Tasmiah Tahera Aziz
Orindom Shing Pulock
AHM Thafikul Mazid
Mastura Akter
Anwarul Karim et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Myths versus Truths regarding the Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-2019) Outbreak
"Background: The Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) is a novel infectious disease caused by the COVID-19 Virus. This virus belongs to the family of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and classified as SARS-CoV-2, a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that is causing an ongoing global pandemic. The outbreak of this novel Coronavirus (nCoV-19) is causing great fear in public due to its rapid spread over 200 countries worldwide and created a global Public Health Emergency. The virus is an intracellular obligatory parasite that can even infect bacteria called Bacteriophage. Unlike Bacteria, Virus is not a living microorganism and can’t multiply in the outer environment. If we draw a line in between the living and non-living, it lies in the border3. However, the peculiar characteristic of the virus is that it can be living after entering the body of the living organism, causing harmful effects. Since it behaves like dust or dirt outside of our body, it is better to wash them out and prevent it to enter our bodies. In this way, the best way of prevention of this novel COVID-19 viral disease is to wash it out from our hand, rather than killing it by using a disinfectant, hand sanitizer, alcohol-based rub, etc.&#x0D;
Key Message: Don’t Get the Virus, Don’t Give the Virus. Since COVID-19 Virus can enter the body from the reservoir mainly through respiratory droplets during coughing, keeping social distance and proper hand-washing are the best way to preventive measure. To prevent the rapid spreading of COVID-19, please strictly follow the following five precautionary and preventive measures yourself and ask others too.&#x0D;
HANDS – wash them often with soap and water&#x0D;
ELBOW – cough into it&#x0D;
FACE – don’t touch it&#x0D;
SPACE – keep social distance (&gt; 3feets)&#x0D;
FEEL SICK? - Stay home (with proper nursing care)"
AUTHORS
Pooja Thapaliya
Laxmi Panthi
Sujana Neupane
Kapil Amgain
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Karnali Academy of Health Sciences

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Distinct systems serology features in children, elderly and COVID patients
"SARS-CoV-2, the pandemic coronavirus that causes COVID-19, has infected millions worldwide, causing unparalleled social and economic disruptions. COVID-19 results in higher pathogenicity and mortality in the elderly compared to children. Examining baseline SARS-CoV-2 cross-reactive coronavirus immunological responses, induced by circulating human coronaviruses, is critical to understand such divergent clinical outcomes. The cross-reactivity of coronavirus antibody responses of healthy children (n=89), adults (n=98), elderly (n=57), and COVID-19 patients (n=19) were analysed by systems serology. While moderate levels of cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2 IgG, IgM, and IgA were detected in healthy individuals, we identified serological signatures associated with SARS-CoV-2 antigen-specific Fcγ receptor binding, which accurately distinguished COVID-19 patients from healthy individuals and suggested that SARS-CoV-2 induces qualitative changes to antibody Fc upon infection, enhancing Fcγ receptor engagement. Vastly different serological signatures were observed between healthy children and elderly, with markedly higher cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG observed in elderly, whereas children displayed elevated SARS-CoV-2 IgM, including receptor binding domain-specific IgM with higher avidity. These results suggest that less-experienced humoral immunity associated with higher IgM, as observed in children, may have the potential to induce more potent antibodies upon SARS-CoV-2 infection. These key insights will inform COVID-19 vaccination strategies, improved serological diagnostics and therapeutics."
AUTHORS
Suzanne K. Shoffner
Christina Y. Lee
Melissa M. Lemke
Carolien E. van de Sandt
Fatima Amanat
Kevin J. Selva et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Corona kills corona: convalescent sera option for global war against corona virus disease 2019
"On December 31st, 2019 China reported first case of atypical pneumonia in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province. The causative virus was found to be a beta coronavirus, closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-1) from 2003 and similar to Sarbeco viruses isolated from bats. It was therefore termed SARS-CoV-2 and the disease was named corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The outbreak in Wuhan expanded quickly and led to the lockdown of Wuhan and other parts of China. While the lockdown, at least temporarily, brought the situation under control in China, but SARS-CoV-2 spread globally causing a pandemic with more than 4 lakh infections and about 19000 fatalities (as of March 25, 2020). Nucleic acid tests that detect the SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome were quickly developed and are now widely employed to diagnose COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Babita .
Mahavir Jangra
S. K. Jha
Anita Punia
PUBLISHED
2020 in International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health

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Symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections display specific IgG Fc structures
"The ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has caused a public health crisis that is exacerbated by our poor understanding of correlates of immunity. SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from asymptomatic carriage to life threatening pneumonia and cytokine dysregulation [1-3]. Although antibodies have been shown in a variety of in vitro assays to promote coronavirus infections through mechanisms requiring interactions between IgG antibodies and Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), the relevance of these observations to coronavirus infections in humans is not known [4-7]. In light of ongoing clinical trials examining convalescent serum therapy for COVID-19 patients and expedited SARS-CoV-2 vaccine testing in humans, it is essential to clarify the role of antibodies in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. Here we show that adults with PCR-diagnosed COVID-19 produce IgG antibodies with a specific Fc domain repertoire that is characterized by reduced fucosylation, a modification that enhances interactions with the activating FcγR, FcγRIIIa. Fc fucosylation was reduced when compared with SARS-CoV-2-seropositive children and relative to adults with symptomatic influenza virus infections. These results demonstrate an antibody correlate of symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections in adults and have implications for novel therapeutic strategies targeting FcγRIIIa pathways."
AUTHORS
Matthew J. Memoli
Prasanna Jagannathan
Jeffery K. Taubenberger
Robert Sherwood
Florian Krammer
Sheng Zhang et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Favipiravir strikes the SARS-CoV-2 at its Achilles heel, the RNA polymerase
"The ongoing Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has emphasized the urgent need for antiviral therapeutics. The viral RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase (RdRp) is a promising target with polymerase inhibitors successfully used for the treatment of several viral diseases. Here we show that Favipiravir exerts an antiviral effect as a nucleotide analogue through a combination of chain termination, slowed RNA synthesis and lethal mutagenesis. The SARS-CoV RdRp complex is at least 10-fold more active than any other viral RdRp known. It possesses both unusually high nucleotide incorporation rates and high-error rates allowing facile insertion of Favipiravir into viral RNA, provoking C-to-U and G-to-A transitions in the already low cytosine content SARS-CoV-2 genome. The coronavirus RdRp complex represents an Achilles heel for SARS-CoV, supporting nucleoside analogues as promising candidates for the treatment of COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Veronique Fattorini
Genevieve Piorkowski
Franck Touret
Johanna Huchting
Thi-Tuyet-Nhung Le
Barbara Selisko et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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CONVALESCENT SERA: TREATMENT FOR NOVEL AND ENIGMATIC COVID-19
"As of early 2020, humanity is attempt a pandemic in severe acute metabolic process syndrome coronavirus a pair of (SARS-CoV-2).SARS-CoV-2 causes coronavirus sickness, abbreviated as COVID-19. With COVID-19, the degree of unwellness varies, ranging from well to sudden and fatal. the world Health Organization estimates that serious unwellness could occur in as several as thirteen.8% of cases and six.1% area unit essential. This Viewpoint argues that human convalescent humour is Associate in Nursing possibility for bar and treatment of COVID-19 sickness. convalescent sera may well be accustomed treat people with early symptoms and stop sickness in those exposed. Hence, as we tend to area unit inside the inside of a worldwide pandemic, we tend to advocate that establishments think about the emergency use of convalescent sera and start preparations as presently as doable. Time is of the essence.
KEYWORDS- Plasmapheresis, Morbilli, Grippe, Coronavirus, Monoclonal Antibody"
AUTHORS
Dr.Suman Saurabh Gupta Dr.Arun Kumar Gupta Dr.Priyanka Chandak Dr.Juhi Kumari
Dr.Suman Saurabh Gupta Dr.Arun Kumar Gupta Dr.Priyanka Chandak
Dr.Suman Saurabh Gupta Dr.Arun Kumar Gupta
Dr.Suman Saurabh Gupta
PUBLISHED
2020 in EPRA International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research (IJMR)

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Treatments and Prophylactics for a Global Emergency Alert: COVID 19 using Allopathic and Indian Phytomedicine
"SARS CoV 2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome novel corona virus-2) to which the world paid the complete attention to face the Global Emergency Alert. COVID 19 was first identified in Wuhan, province in China on December, 2020. The virus was originated from the Bats and transmitted through other intermediary animals. There are around 12.7 lakhs reported cases and more than 69.4 thousands deaths (06/04/2020) which pave the way for having the health crises in the entire world’s population. The governing bodies of the various countries are quarantining their people to avoid the various stages of CoV spreading. Compared to the SARS CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus) and MERS CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus), the fatality rate was lower. But it provides the major impacts on elder population (fatality rate more than 40-50 %). Normal/ low white cell counts with elevated CRP (C-reactive protein ) severs as the laboratory findings for the SARS CoV 2 with the symptoms of cough, sneeze, difficulties in breathing and fever followed by ARDS (Acute respiratory distress syndrome) and multi organ dysfunction. By complete understanding of CoV 2 Pathogenesis, presently many drugs are repositioning to completely eradicate the COVID 19. So many drugs are under clinical trials in which the Hydroxychloroquine produces the greater effects on SARS CoV. Likewise many drugs are subjected to this mega clinical trial by repositioning the drugs.  AYUSH recommends some of the prophylactics and dietary supplements for the COVID 19. This global emergency was not only for the researchers but also all professionals and their impact to the world’s developed and developing countries still unknown."
AUTHORS
Aravindhanathan Venkatesan Sudhakar Kothandan Arun Radhakrishnan Gowthamarajan Kuppuswamy Dhanabal Palanisamy Balasubramanian Somanathan
Aravindhanathan Venkatesan Sudhakar Kothandan Arun Radhakrishnan Gowthamarajan Kuppuswamy Dhanabal Palanisamy
Aravindhanathan Venkatesan Sudhakar Kothandan Arun Radhakrishnan Gowthamarajan Kuppuswamy
Aravindhanathan Venkatesan Sudhakar Kothandan Arun Radhakrishnan
Aravindhanathan Venkatesan Sudhakar Kothandan
Aravindhanathan Venkatesan et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in International Journal of Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences

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Protecting older adults of Sri Lanka amid COVID-19
"&lt;p&gt;Older adults over 60 are at a higher risk of getting severely sick and dying from COVID–19. Sri Lanka has one of the fastest aging populations in South and South–East Asia. In addition to having a rapidly aging population, Sri Lanka is a developing country with limited resources to accommodate the older population that can be significantly affected by COVID–19. Statistics up to date shows that older adults are at a much higher risk of dying from COVID–19. Older adults being at a much higher risk of contracting and dying from COVID–19 has important implications for the way in which public health and clinical responses should be developed. These implications have been largely overlooked in both high and low and middle–income countries when providing guidance and implementing regulations, which can have a greater impact in low and middle–income countries. Preparedness of the healthcare systems to respond to the pandemic with a lack of facilities, resources (i.e., ventilators) and staff in the healthcare system, specifically in hospitals, intensive care units and long–term care homes is a concern that should be taken into consideration when clinical responses are developed. Challenges around protecting community–dwelling older adults who are caregivers to grandchildren, receiving informal care from children in the same household, living in living in remote areas, or living alone or dependent on others need to be taken into consideration when developing public health responses.&lt;/p&gt;"
AUTHOR
Keshini Madara Marasinghe
PUBLISHED
2020 by SAGE Publications (Book)

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Use of Existing Health Data in Epidemiologic Research–Issues of Informed Consent Under Normal Circumstances and at a Time of Health Crises
"In epidemiologic research we study why we get sick and how we get better. To do this we frequently need
large datasets on exposure, diagnoses, treatment and more. We need data often classified as sensitive and
regulated by law stating a need for informed consent. We argue that modern epidemiologic research often
can be done on existing data without having informed consent and without violating basic ethic principles.
We also argue for a timely and fair access to data in approved project. Modern encryption technics and
methods of data analyses can reduce the risk of disclosure of personal data to a level close to what we have
for anonymous data. If we allow open use of administrative health data and existing research data, we will
be able to produce much more information to advance disease prevention, health promotion and treatment.
Epidemiologists should collaborate more with computer scientists and patient groups in
developing/implementing principles for ‘modern methods of data analyses’. Under a severe health crisis
data are in high demand to provide the information needed to prevent deaths and diseases and often time
does not permit requiring ‘informed consent’. Such a situation in now plying out worldwide under the
Covid-19 pandemic."
AUTHORS
Uffe Juul Jensen
Jørn Olsen
Carsten Obel
Carsten Obel
PUBLISHED
2020 in Clinical Oncology and Research

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Lower airways and lungs affection in coronavirus infection covid-19 among children and adults: similarities and differences (review of literature)
"The review presents the data of actual publications for 2019-2020 regarding the course of a new coronavirus infection COVID-19 in children and adults. The features of a new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causes of its tropism to human respiratory system are discussed. The questions of clinical and roentgenological manifestations of lung affection in COVID-19 among children and adults are described in details. The adult COVID-19 is characterized by the presence of clinical symptoms of acute respiratory viral infection: elevation of temperature ( 90 %), cough (dry or with small amount of sputum) in 80% of cases, dyspnea (55 %), fatigability (44 %), sense of stiffness in chest ( 20 %). The most severe dyspnea is being developed by the days 68 from the moment of falling ill. Separately, the peculiar features of computed tomography of the lungs in children and adults with COVID-19 are discussed. The typical signs for CT-picture of the lungs in children with COVID-19 infection and pneumonia are bilateral affection, infiltration with a typical surrounding aureole the sign of halo, the symptom of opal glass with predominantly peripheral localization and often in combination with elevated procalcitonin level. The cases of pneumonias in newborns and children of the first year of life with COVID-19 infection are considered in the paper. A clinical case with roentgenograms of thoracic organs and results of computed tomography accompanying is presented as an illustration. The high-risk groups of complicated COVID-19 course can include children with chronic bronchopulmonary diseases, patients with immune deficiencies, hemodynamically significant heart failures and chronic renal disease."
AUTHORS
I. P. Koryukina
M. N. Repetskaya
E. G. Furman
PUBLISHED
2020 in Perm Medical Journal

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Literature review
2019 Novel Coronavirus Infection in Children and Infants: Where We Are and What We Know
": Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in Wuhan, China, there were more than 1,773,000 confirmed infected cases. This infection has spread to almost all countries around the world with reported high mortality and morbidity. Infections in children and infants have been reported as well. The condition of the infected children was mostly mild. To date, there have been two reported deaths in pediatrics testing positive for COVID-19 in China, and no deaths have been reported in the published evidence from other countries. The therapy strategy for the children who suffer coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been based on the adult experience. The present review summarizes current knowledge of the etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of COVID-19 infection in children and infants."
AUTHORS
Melika Mokhtari
Elahe Ahsan
Kimia Vakili
Mobina Fathi
Shirin Yaghoobpoor
Niloofar Deravi et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases

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Literature review
Blood Safety in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
": SARS-CoV-2 is a novel infectious agent that rapidly spread from a single city in China to all parts of the world. Right now, the world is facing a major pandemic crisis and every infected patient can infect the other two to three persons. The non-specific symptoms at the early stages of coronavirus 2019 (Covid-19) and also the presence of infected asymptomatic patients result in the absence of accurate estimation of infected patients. Although coronaviruses often affect the upper or lower respiratory tract, viral shedding in plasma or serum can occur and therefore, there is a theoretical risk regarding the transmission of these viruses by transfusion. Experience with other viruses from the corona family group (SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV) tells us that Covid-19 might have a significant impact on blood supply. Until now, SARS-CoV-2 has not been identified as a transfusion transmissible virus and viremia has only been diagnosed in serious patients who would not be allowed for blood donation. In this review article, the safety of blood products during the Covid-19 outbreak is discussed."
AUTHOR
Mozhgan Hashemieh
PUBLISHED
2020 in Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases

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Literature review
Literature Review of Epidemiological Phenomena: Corona Virus Disease Pandemic 2019
"Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or Corona virus is a new type of coronavirus that is transmitted to humans. Corona virus infection called COVID-19 (Corona Virus Disease 2019) was first discovered in the city of Wuhan, China at the end of December 2019. Until March 2, 2020, more than 80 thousand confirmed cases have been reported in China. Of these cases, 49 thousand were identified in Wuhan City. Epidemiologically, the spread or distribution of this disease has a wide social and economic impact on the world. Many literature studies about the COVID-19 outbreak, such as causes, natural history of the disease, even to the preventive and medical treatment. Since the end of 2019 until April 2020, there have been many published literature or literature studies at both national and international levels, so this paper aims to examine literature studies related to COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Zakiyuddin Zakiyuddin
Fitriani Fitriani
Teungku Nih Farisni
Yarmaliza Yarmaliza
Lili Eky Nursia N
Safrizal Safrizal et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in European Journal of Medical and Health Sciences

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COVID-19, Various Treatment Options and Special Considerations for Dentistry
"Objective: The aim of this article is to analyze the epidemiology of COVID-19, comparison of routes of transmission in children and adults, comparing the clinical symptoms in adults and children, treatment protocol to be followed and possible treatment options during this pandemic. Data Sources: Data is collected from Pubmed, Medline and Embase databases.&#x0D;
Discussion from Previous References Used: Few studies have been done to analyze its effect on children comparing the symptoms of adults and children. Also very less work is done to analyze the special precautions taken while doing dental treatment during this pandemic.&#x0D;
Conclusion: The widespread effect of Coronavirus (COVID-19) or SARS-CoV-2 has created health concerns in the world. Although efforts have been taken to control the disease, it is still increasing due to the community spread. Health professionals may get patients in their practice with this infection and should prevent its spread.&#x0D;
Clinical Significance of this Article: It will help us to differentiate the specific clinical symptoms of adult and pediatric patients coming to dental clinics and the special considerations for them including the emergency dental treatment during COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Atul Bhardwaj
Sami Alduwayhi
Smita Singh Bhardwaj
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International

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Anxiety and perceived risk during COVID-19 outbreak
"The uncertainty around coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has triggered anxiety among public. We aimed to assess the variation in anxiety and risk perceptions of COVID-19 among adults in Singapore. We administered a web-survey to a panel of residents between 31 March and 14 April 2020. We assessed anxiety using general anxiety disorder (GAD) scale and assessed participants risk perceptions regarding severity of the outbreak. Of the 1,017 participants, 23% reported moderate to severe anxiety (GAD score above 10). A high proportion reported perceived likelihood of ICU admission (46%) and death (30%) upon getting COVID-19. Results from path analysis showed that younger participants, those with chronic conditions, those living with children and low perceived trust in government response to COVID-19 had a significantly higher anxiety mediated by their perceived risk of dying upon getting COVID-19. These results highlight the need for management of anxiety through adequate and effective risk communication for the general public."
AUTHORS
Eric A Finkelstein
Irene Teo
Semra Ozdemir
Isha Chaudhry
Chetna Malhotra
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Literature review
The Resilient Child: Sex Hormones and COVID-19 Incidence in Pediatric Patients
"Abstract
COVID-19, a disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 infection, has become an unprecedented global health emergency, with fatal outcomes among adults of all ages in the United States, and the highest incidence and mortality in adult males. As the pandemic evolves there is limited understanding of a potential association between symptomatic viral infection and age. To date, there is no knowledge of the role children (pre-pubescent, ages 9 to 13) play as “silent” vectors of the virus, with themselves being asymptomatic. Throughout different time frames and geographic locations, the current evidence on COVID-19 suggests that children are getting infected at a significantly lower rate than other age groups - as low as 1%. Androgens upregulate the protease TMPRSS2 (Type-II Transmembrane Serine Protease-2), which facilitates efficient virus-host cell fusion with the epithelium of the lungs, thus increasing susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and development of severe COVID-19. Due to low levels of steroid hormones, pre-pubertal children may have low expression of TMPRSS2, thereby limiting the viral entry into host cells. As the world anticipates a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the role of pre-pubescent children as vectors transmitting the virus must be interrogated to prepare for a potential resurgence of COVID-19. This review discusses the current evidence on the low incidence of COVID-19 in children and the effect of sex steroid hormones on SARS-CoV-2 viral infection and clinical outcomes of pediatric patients. Upon reopening society at large, schools will need to implement heightened health protocols, with the knowledge that children as the “silent” viral transmitters, can significantly impact the adult populations."
AUTHORS
Ketan K Badani
Maddison Archer
Barbara M Chubak
Naoum Fares Marayati
Alice C Levine
Meredith Mihalopoulos et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Journal of the Endocrine Society

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New COVID-19 coronavirus infection in the practice of a neonatologist and pediatrician
"The article analyses the data published from January 2020 to April 25, 2020 in the print media or available on the official websites of peer-reviewed medical sources (pre print), international and national medical professional communities, and state regulatory authorities dedicated to the epidemiological and clinical laboratory features of the new coronavirus infection in newborns, infants and older children. The authors have concluded that currently there are no convincing data on vertical transmission of infection. At the same time, they have found that there is a risk of horizontal infection of a newborn child; therefore, there is the need for strict adherence to the recommended algorithms for monitoring children in the neonatal period born by the women with positive or presumably positive COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease 2019) status. The authors note that due to the limited quantity of observation cases, all existing recommendations are temporary and may be revised. The newborns from mothers with COVID-19 demonstrate the variability of clinical picture from asymptomatic course to severe respiratory failure. In the post-neonatal period children have asymptomatic or mild course of a new coronavirus infection. The authors note that some children with an asymptomatic course of the disease have pneumonia detectable during X-ray examination. Children with the manifest forms of COVID-19 do not have specific clinical symptoms; both children and adults have fever, cough and other catarrhal symptoms; tachypia, tachycardia and gastrointestinal symptoms are much less common. It has been found that children with COVID-19, unlike adults, are unlikely to develop severe pneumonia, as well as conditions requiring intensive care and mechanical ventilation. Changes in laboratory parameters in children also do not have a consistent pattern and they are less pronounced than in adults. The epidemiological data indicate that children are one of the main sources of the ongoing spread of infection in the human population. The authors present the first-ever data on the cases of 45 infants born from the mothers with positive COVID-19 status in Moscow."
AUTHORS
A. A. Dementyev
A. K. Mironova
A. V. Dmitriev
V. V. Gorev
I. M. Osmanov
A. L. Zaplatnikov et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Rossiyskiy Vestnik Perinatologii i Pediatrii (Russian Bulletin of Perinatology and Pediatrics)

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A Review on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Pediatric Patients
"Context: A series of unexplained pneumonia cases were first reported as of December 2019, in Wuhan, China. Official names have been announced for the novel human coronavirus responsible for the pneumonia outbreak in China, and the disease it causes has been announced Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Despite great efforts worldwide to control the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, the spread of the virus has recently reached a pandemic. Currently, infection prevention and control of this virus are the primary concerns for public health officials and professionals. In this review, the current status of epidemiology, diagnosis, and potential treatment options of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and the possible reasons for milder presentations of COVID-19 in children than in adults were discussed to provide an insight into the further characterization of COVID-19 in children. Evidence Acquisition: The most recent evidence about the clinical features and potential reasons for the non-susceptibility of children to SARS-CoV-2 infection have been provided in the present narrative review. A systematic search was performed in some databases/search engines, including ISI Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, and Google Scholar. Then, the relevant published articles were reviewed. The keywords utilized for finding related articles were Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), pediatric, COVID-19, treatment, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2), clinical feature, coronavirus, and pneumonia. Results: Based on the findings, respiratory infections caused by the virus are more frequent in children aged five years or younger than in other age groups. However, the currently available data suggest that COVID-19 infection in children seems to be uncommon. Moreover, in the case of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the disease presentation is frequently milder than in adults and the overall burden in children was reported to be relatively low. Conclusions: Several explanations have been suggested to justify the milder symptoms in children than in adults, including differences in immunity systems of children and adults and differences in ACE2 expression as a receptor for virus attachment. Moreover, while children tend to present mild symptoms of infection, their role in the spread of the disease in the community should not be ignored."
AUTHORS
Solmaz Ohadian Moghadam
Davoud Afshar
PUBLISHED
2020 in Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases

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Clinical characteristics and epidemiology survey of lung transplantation recipients accepting surgeries during the COVID-19 pandemic:from area near Hubei Province
"Lung transplantation recipients (LTx) were susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome-corona virus-2 (SARS-Cov-2) and suffered a higher mortality risk than healthy subjects. Here we aim to analyze whether it was appropriate or and valuable to maintain lung transplant programs in medical institutions accepting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. In this study, the clinical characteristics, laboratory testing and epidemiology survey results of 10 LTx recipients undergoing allograft lung transplantation surgeries in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University during the COVID-19 pandemic were collected. A web-based epidemiology questionnaire was used to collect the information of LTx recipients after discharge. Up to now, none of the LTx recipients or their family members get infected with SARS-CoV-2 during the novel coronavirus pandemic. In conclusion, under the premise of taking appropriate preventive measures during hospitalization and after discharge, the lung transplant program can be maintained in the medical institution that accepts patients with COVID-19."
AUTHORS
Zeming Fang
Xiaoguang Zhao
Shanshan Chen
Huaqi Wang
Cong Wang
Lingxiao Qiu et al
PUBLISHED
2020 in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Are cloth masks as effective as surgical masks at reducing the risk of contracting viruses that cause respiratory disease?
6 studies
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Can you contract COVID-19 twice?
5 studies
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Do cloth masks reduce the risk of contracting viruses that cause respiratory disease?
10 studies
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Does air pollution accelerate the spread of COVID-19?
7 studies
Submitted by: JLjilijana 85

Does air pollution increase the severity of symptoms from COVID-19?
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Submitted by: KKrista 83

Does an N95 mask reduce the risk of contracting viruses that cause respiratory disease better than a surgical mask?
17 studies
Submitted by: ELee 65

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