Do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?

Submitted by: EZabel 110

No, undocumented immigrants do not commit more crime than native-born americans. The studies in this list for which we have identified answers are unanimous on this conclusion. Some studies came to a different conclusion, but State of K deems these studies less credible than the ones that are unanimous. Review the individual study summaries below for more information.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 10 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong.
1
YES ANSWERS
8
NO ANSWERS
0
MIXED RESULTS ANSWERS
1
INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE ANSWERS
0
NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 10 studies examining this question

All answers are assigned by State of K users. The label Mixed means that a study found some evidence to indicate that the answer to the question is "yes" and some evidence to indicate that the answer is "no". This label is often applied when a study uses two or more proxies to study the same phenomenon (i.e. firearm sales figures and self-reported firearm ownership rates as proxies for the prevalence of firearms) and the proxies yield different results when looking for correlations with another phenomenon (i.e. firearm-related deaths). Alternatively, the label may be applied if the phenomenon under study (i.e. whether breast milk improves cognitive function) is true for one group, but not another (i.e. true for girls, but not for boys). The label Insuff. Evidence means that a study found there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion regarding the question. The label No Data means that State of K wasn't able to identify the study's response to the question based on the information that was available. This label is often applied when the person creating the list does not have access to the full text and the answer isn't clear from the abstract.

All labels of Literature Reviews and Highly Regarded Source are assigned by State of K. The label Highly Regarded Source, as applied to journals, is a label assigned to the top 20 journals (as measured by the h-index) in various subcategories as classified and reported by Google Scholar. As applied to NGOs, the label is assigned to US NGOs ranked by the TTCSP Global Go To Think Tank Index Reports. The information contained in a source that is labelled "highly regarded" is not necessarily more accurate than information contained in a source without that label.


QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?
5 studies
Submitted by: PSingh 0

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
44 studies
Submitted by: LWong 0

Why do people believe that undocumented immigrants are a criminal threat?
4 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Are presidential democracies more prone to becoming dictatorships than parliamentary democracies?
24 studies
Submitted by: SMendoza 75

Do driver training programs reduce traffic injuries?
13 studies
Submitted by: DBuss 82

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans" to consider?

SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 10
Sorted by publication year
1
Do Apprehensions of Undocumented Immigrants Reduce Crime and Create Jobs: Evidence from U.S. Districts, 2000-2015
"We analyze whether the intensity of immigration enforcement,measured as apprehensions of undocumented immigrants1 per thousandpeople, affects local crime rates and the local labor market opportunitiesof native workers.2 Using data across seventeen U.S. Immigration andCustoms Enforcement (“ICE”) districts over the period 2000-2015, wetake advantage of a sudden surge in the apprehension rate from 2007-2011, followed by a decline in 2012-2015. The magnitude of the increasein apprehensions varied significantly across districts, depending on theintensity of local enforcement, and on the size of the local undocumentedpopulation. We use the variation created by this surge in difference-indifferences analysis. We do not find any evidence that more apprehensionsin a district reduced crime rates, nor do we find evidence thatapprehensions improved employment and wages for less educated natives.These findings do not support the rhetoric that deportations removecriminals and/or make more jobs available to natives."
AUTHORS
Annie Laurie Hines
Giovanni Peri
PUBLISHED
2018 in University of California Davis Law Review
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
2
Does Undocumented Immigration Increase Violent Crime?
"Despite substantial public, political, and scholarly attention to the issue of immigration and crime, we know little about the criminological consequences of undocumented immigration. As a result, fundamental questions about whether undocumented immigration increases violent crime remain unanswered. In an attempt to address this gap, we combine newly developed estimates of the unauthorized population with multiple data sources to capture the criminal, socioeconomic, and demographic context of all 50 states and Washington, DC, from 1990 to 2014 to provide the first longitudinal analysis of the macro‐level relationship between undocumented immigration and violence. The results from fixed‐effects regression models reveal that undocumented immigration does not increase violence. Rather, the relationship between undocumented immigration and violent crime is generally negative, although not significant in all specifications. Using supplemental models of victimization data and instrumental variable methods, we find little evidence that these results are due to decreased reporting or selective migration to avoid crime. We consider the theoretical and policy implications of these findings against the backdrop of the dramatic increase in immigration enforcement in recent decades."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
TY MILLER
MICHAEL T. LIGHT
PUBLISHED
2018 in Criminology
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
3
Undocumented Immigrants, U.S. Citizens, and Convicted Criminals in Arizona
"Using newly released detailed data on all prisoners who entered the Arizona state prison from January 1985 through June 2017, we are able to separate non-U.S. citizens by whether they are illegal or legal residents. Unlike other studies, these data do not rely on self-reporting of criminal backgrounds. Undocumented immigrants are at least 142% more likely to be convicted of a crime than other Arizonans. They also tend to commit more serious crimes and serve 10.5% longer sentences, more likely to be classified as dangerous, and 45% more likely to be gang members than U.S. citizens. Yet, there are several reasons that these numbers are likely to underestimate the share of crime committed by undocumented immigrants. There are dramatic differences between in the criminal histories of convicts who are U.S. citizens and undocumented immigrants.Young convicts are especially likely to be undocumented immigrants. While undocumented immigrants from 15 to 35 years of age make up slightly over two percent of the Arizona population, they make up about eight percent of the prison population. Even after adjusting for the fact that young people commit crime at higher rates, young undocumented immigrants commit crime at twice the rate of young U.S. citizens. These undocumented immigrants also tend to commit more serious crimes.If undocumented immigrants committed crime nationally as they do in Arizona, in 2016 they would have been responsible for over 1,000 more murders, 5,200 rapes, 8,900 robberies, 25,300 aggravated assaults, and 26,900 burglaries."
AUTHOR
John R. Lott
PUBLISHED
2018 by Crime Prevention Research Center (NGO)
NGO FUNDING
This organization does not disclose its donors
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
4
Criminal Immigrants: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin
"This brief uses American Community Survey data to analyze incarcerated immigrants according to their citizenship and legal status. All immigrants are less likely to be incarcerated than natives relative to their shares of the population. Even illegal immigrants are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Alex Nowrasteh
Michelangelo Landgrave
PUBLISHED
2017 by Cato Institute (NGO)
NGO FUNDING
This organization does not disclose its donors
NGO IDEOLOGY
Generally opposed to policy solutions requiring the redistribution of wealth through taxation and regulation of private industries
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
5
How Much Crime Do Undocumented Immigrants Commit in Utah?
"There is a lot of speculation and twisting of facts when it comes to the question of how much crime undocumented immigrants commit in Utah. This report is an attempt to examine the empirical evidence (although it is by no means complete) to answer this question, using the data without picking and choosing convenient statistics or ignoring statistics that might go against one's ideology. Social and historical context will be provided in an attempt to understand what the numbers mean."
AUTHOR
Charlie V. Morgan
PUBLISHED
2011 by Sutherland Institute (NGO)
NGO FUNDING
This organization does not disclose its donors
NGO IDEOLOGY
Generally opposed to policy solutions requiring the redistribution of wealth through taxation and regulation of private industries
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
6
Examining the Relationship between Immigration Status and Criminal Involvement: Do Illegal Immigrants Commit More Crime?
"A perceived link between illegal immigration and crime continues to exist. Citizens continue to believe that immigration creates crime and fear that as the immigrant population grows, their safety is jeopardized. Not much research in the field of criminology, however, has focused on examining this perceived relationship between immigration and crime. Those studies which have examined the relationship have mainly relied on official data to conduct their analysis. The purpose of this thesis is to examine the relationship between immigration and crime by examining self report data as well as some official data on immigration status and criminal involvement. More specifically, this thesis examines therelationship between immigration status and four different types of criminal involvement; property crimes, violent crimes, drug sales, and drug use. Data from a sample of 1,990 arrestees in the Maricopa County, Arizona, was used to conduct this analysis. This data was collected through the Arizona Arrestee Reporting Information Network over the course of a year. The results of the logistic regression models indicate that immigrants tend to commit less crime than U.S. citizens. Furthermore, illegal immigrants are significantly less likely than U.S. citizens to commit any of the four types of crimes, with the exception of powder cocaine use."
AUTHOR
Lidia E. Nuño
PUBLISHED
2011 in Thesis
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
7
The Immigration-Crime Nexus and Post-Deportation Experiences: En/Countering Stereotypes in Southern California and El Salvador
"This article reviews research findings on immigration and crime in Southern California, and deportation and crime in El Salvador. We focus on the experiences of young adult children of immigrants, mainly Mexicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans who together account for two-thirds or more of the undocumented immigrant population in the U.S.; and on men, including former gang members, who have been deported to El Salvador on criminal and non-criminal charges. \n\nThe evidence rebuts popular myths that immigrants and deportees are more prone to criminal behavior than natives and citizens. Nationally, rates of incarceration among immigrant men are much lower than among their U.S.-born counterparts. Like crime generally, the problem of gangs in the U.S. is primarily one that involves the U.S. born, who as citizens are not deportable; and despite the aim of public policies to remove problematic “criminal” and “illegal” beings, deportation is not the end of the cycle of migration."
AUTHORS
Rubén G. Rumbaut
Katie Dingeman
PUBLISHED
2010 in University of La Verne Law Review
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
8
Immigration and Crime: Assessing a Conflicted Issue
"Some opinion surveys show that the public thinks immigrants overall or illegal aliens in particular have high rates of crime. On the other hand, a number of academic researchers and journalists have argued that immigrants have low rates of crime. In our view, poor data quality and conflicting evidence mean that neither of these views is well supported.\n\nIn conclusion, we find that it would be a mistake to assume that immigrants as a group are more prone to crime than other groups, or that they should be viewed with more suspicion than others. Even though immigrant incarceration rates are high in some populations, there is no clear evidence that immigrants commit crimes at higher or lower rates than others. Nevertheless, it also would be a mistake to conclude that immigrant crime is insignificant or that offenders’ immigration status is irrelevant in local policing. \n\nThe newer information available as a result of better screening of the incarcerated population suggests that, in many parts of the country, immigrants are responsible for a significant share of crime. This indicates that there are legitimate public safety reasons for local law enforcement agencies to determine the immigration status of offenders and to work with federal immigration authorities."
AUTHORS
Steven A. Camarota
Jessica Vaughan
PUBLISHED
2009 by Center for Immigration Studies (NGO)
NGO FUNDING
This organization does not disclose its donors
NGO IDEOLOGY
Promotes reducing immigration to the US
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Insufficient Evidence
Insufficient Evidence
9
Undocumented Immigration and Rates of Crime and Imprisonment: Popular Myths and Empirical Realities
"The perception that the foreign-born, especially “illegal aliens,” are responsible for highercrime rates is deeply rooted in American public opinion and is sustained by media anecdote andpopular myth. In the absence of rigorous empirical research, stereotypes about immigrants andcrime often provide the underpinnings for public policies and practices, and shape public opinionand political behavior (Chávez 2001; Hagan and Palloni 1999; Lee 2003; Martínez and Valenzuela2006). Such stereotypes, reinforced through popular movies and television programs andfueled by media coverage of singular events, project an enduring image of immigrant communitiespermeated by criminal elements.\n\nBut these perceptions are not supported empirically; instead, as demonstrated below, theyare refuted by the preponderance of scientific evidence. Both contemporary and historical studies,including official crime statistics and victimization surveys since the early 1990s, data fromthe last three decennial censuses, national and regional surveys in areas of immigrant concentration,and investigations carried out by major government commissions over the past century, haveshown instead that immigration is associated with lower crime rates and lower incarcerationrates.\n\nIn what follows we examine the relationship of contemporary immigration, including undocumentedmigration, to crime and imprisonment. First, at the national level, we analyze changesin the rates of violent crimes and property crimes during the years of the surge in immigration.Next we look at the incarceration rates of young men eighteen to thirty-nine, comparing theforeign-born versus the U.S.-born by national origin and by education, and, among the foreignborn,by length of residence in the United States. The analysis compares the rates of incarcerationof foreign-born young men from nationalities the majority of whom are undocumented immigrants with less than a high school education (Mexicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans) versusthe rates for other immigrant nationalities as well as for native ethnic majority and minoritygroups. Finally, we summarize the available empirical evidence from a wide range of other studies,compare it to prevailing public perceptions, and note their implications for criminological theory,research, and public policy."
AUTHORS
John Hagan
G W Potter
M Blumberg
V E Kappeler
Ruben G Rumbaut
Rubén G. Rumbaut et al
PUBLISHED
2008 in Invited Address to the “Immigration Enforcement and Civil Liberties: The Role of Local Police” National Conference, Police Foundation, Washington, DC, August 21-22, 2008
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
10
Are Deportable Aliens a Unique Threat to Public Safety? Comparing the Recidivism of Deportable and Nondeportable Aliens
"The study compared the recidivism of 517 deportable and 780 nondeportable aliens released from the Los Angeles County Jail over a 30-day period in 2002. The results of our analyses revealed no difference in the rearrest rate of deportable and nondeportable aliens in terms of its occurrence, frequency, or timing.\n \nThe results lend no support to the ubiquitous assertion that deportable aliens are a unique threat to public safety. These findings undermine one common justification offered for the current crackdown on deport-able aliens within the country. More research is needed to determine whether these results can be replicated generally and with subtypes of deportable aliens."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Marika J. Suttorp
Laura J. Hickman
PUBLISHED
2008 in Criminology & Public Policy
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
State of K periodically recommends additional studies to add to this list, both newly published and newly discovered. There are none for now, but check back another time.


QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?
5 studies
Submitted by: PSingh 0

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
44 studies
Submitted by: LWong 0

Why do people believe that undocumented immigrants are a criminal threat?
4 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Are presidential democracies more prone to becoming dictatorships than parliamentary democracies?
24 studies
Submitted by: SMendoza 75

Do driver training programs reduce traffic injuries?
13 studies
Submitted by: DBuss 82

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans" to consider?