Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?

Submitted by: LWong 0

No, legal immigrants do not commit more crime than native-born americans. The vast majority of studies in this list came to this conclusion.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 44 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong.
0
YES ANSWERS
34
NO ANSWERS
6
MIXED RESULTS ANSWERS
1
INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE ANSWERS
3
NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 44 studies examining this question
Showing up to 10 at a time

All answers are assigned by State of K users. The label Mixed means that a study found some evidence to indicate that the answer to the question is "yes" and some evidence to indicate that the answer is "no". This label is often applied when a study uses two or more proxies to study the same phenomenon (i.e. firearm sales figures and self-reported firearm ownership rates as proxies for the prevalence of firearms) and the proxies yield different results when looking for correlations with another phenomenon (i.e. firearm-related deaths). Alternatively, the label may be applied if the phenomenon under study (i.e. whether breast milk improves cognitive function) is true for one group, but not another (i.e. true for girls, but not for boys). The label Insuff. Evidence means that a study found there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion regarding the question. The label No Data means that State of K wasn't able to identify the study's response to the question based on the information that was available. This label is often applied when the person creating the list does not have access to the full text and the answer isn't clear from the abstract.

All labels of Literature Reviews and Highly Regarded Source are assigned by State of K. The label Highly Regarded Source, as applied to journals, is a label assigned to the top 20 journals (as measured by the h-index) in various subcategories as classified and reported by Google Scholar. As applied to NGOs, the label is assigned to US NGOs ranked by the TTCSP Global Go To Think Tank Index Reports. The information contained in a source that is labelled "highly regarded" is not necessarily more accurate than information contained in a source without that label.

Literature Reviews
Although we recommend you consider all of the studies below, we believe the following studies are literature reviews, which survey and evaluate many studies on this question:

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
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Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
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Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?
5 studies
Submitted by: PSingh 0

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 44 showing 20 studies at a time
Sorted by publication year
21
Exploring the Connection between Immigration and Crime Rates in U.S. Cities, 1980-2000
"A popular perception is that immigration causes higher crime rates. Yet, historical and contemporary research finds that at the individual level, immigrants are not more inclined to commit crime than the native born. Knowledge of the macro-level relationship between immigration and crime, however, is characterized by important gaps. Most notably, despite the fact that immigration is a macro-level social process that unfolds over time, longitudinal macro-level research on the immigration-crime nexus is virtually nonexistent. Moreover, while several theoretical perspectives posit sound reasons why over-time changes in immigration could result in higher or lower crime rates, we currently know little about the veracity of these arguments. \n\nTo address these issues, this study investigates the longitudinal relationship between immigration and violent crime across U.S. cities and provides the first empirical assessment of theoretical perspectives that offer explanations of that relationship. \n\nFindings support the argument that immigration lowers violent crime rates by bolstering intact (two-parent) family structures."
AUTHORS
Charis E. Kubrin
Graham C. Ousey
PUBLISHED
2009 in Social Problems
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
22
Immigration and Crime: Assessing a Conflicted Issue
"Some opinion surveys show that the public thinks immigrants overall or illegal aliens in particular have high rates of crime. On the other hand, a number of academic researchers and journalists have argued that immigrants have low rates of crime. In our view, poor data quality and conflicting evidence mean that neither of these views is well supported.\n\nIn conclusion, we find that it would be a mistake to assume that immigrants as a group are more prone to crime than other groups, or that they should be viewed with more suspicion than others. Even though immigrant incarceration rates are high in some populations, there is no clear evidence that immigrants commit crimes at higher or lower rates than others. Nevertheless, it also would be a mistake to conclude that immigrant crime is insignificant or that offenders’ immigration status is irrelevant in local policing. \n\nThe newer information available as a result of better screening of the incarcerated population suggests that, in many parts of the country, immigrants are responsible for a significant share of crime. This indicates that there are legitimate public safety reasons for local law enforcement agencies to determine the immigration status of offenders and to work with federal immigration authorities."
AUTHORS
Steven A. Camarota
Jessica Vaughan
PUBLISHED
2009 by Center for Immigration Studies (NGO)
NGO FUNDING
This organization does not disclose its donors
NGO IDEOLOGY
Promotes reducing immigration to the US
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Insufficient Evidence
Insufficient Evidence
23
Immigration, Economic Disadvantage, and Homicide: A Community-Level Analysis of Austin, Texas
"In this article, the effect of recent immigration on homicide rates across city of Austin, Texas census tracts is examined. Since 1980, Austin’s recent immigrant population increased by more than 580% across the metropolitan area and it is now considered a “pre-emerging” immigrant gateway city to the United States. Therefore the changing population dynamics in Austin provide an excellent opportunity to study the effect of recent immigration on homicide. \n\nAfter controlling for structural predictors of homicide and correcting for spatial autocorrelation, our findings indicate that recent immigration is not associated with homicide."
AUTHORS
Scott Akins
Richard Stansfield
Rubén G. Rumbaut
PUBLISHED
2009 in Homicide Studies
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
24
Immigration and the Recent Violent Crime Drop in the United States: A Pooled, Cross-Sectional Time-Series Analysis of Metropolitan Areas
"A good deal of research in recent years has revisited the relationship between immigration and violent crime. Various scholars have suggested that, contrary to the claims of the classic Chicago School, large immigrant populations might be associated with lower rather than higher rates of criminal violence. A limitation of the research in this area is that it has been based largely on cross-sectional analyses for a restricted range of geographic areas. \n\nUsing time-series techniques and annual data for metropolitan areas over the 1994–2004 period, we assess the impact of changes in immigration on changes in violent crime rates. The findings of multivariate analyses indicate that violent crime rates tended to decrease as metropolitan areas experienced gains in their concentration of immigrants. This inverse relationship is especially robust for the offense of robbery. \n\nOverall, our results support the hypothesis that the broad reductions in violent crime during recent years are partially attributable to increases in immigration."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Lawrence E. Raffalovich
Kelly F. McGeever
Stephen F. Messner
Jacob I. Stowell
PUBLISHED
2009 in Criminology
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
25
Are Deportable Aliens a Unique Threat to Public Safety? Comparing the Recidivism of Deportable and Nondeportable Aliens
"The study compared the recidivism of 517 deportable and 780 nondeportable aliens released from the Los Angeles County Jail over a 30-day period in 2002. The results of our analyses revealed no difference in the rearrest rate of deportable and nondeportable aliens in terms of its occurrence, frequency, or timing.\n \nThe results lend no support to the ubiquitous assertion that deportable aliens are a unique threat to public safety. These findings undermine one common justification offered for the current crackdown on deport-able aliens within the country. More research is needed to determine whether these results can be replicated generally and with subtypes of deportable aliens."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Marika J. Suttorp
Laura J. Hickman
PUBLISHED
2008 in Criminology & Public Policy
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
26
AUTHOR
Robert J. Sampson
PUBLISHED
2008 in Contexts
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
27
Crime, Corrections, and California: What Does Immigration Have to Do with It?
"Few issues are as contentious as immigration and crime. Concernover the effects of immigration on crime is longstanding, and bansagainst criminal aliens constituted some of the earliest restrictionson immigration to the United States (Kanstroom, 2007). Morerecently, policies adopted in the mid-1990s greatly expanded thescope of acts for which noncitizens may be expelled from the United States. Even so, manycalls to curtail immigration, particularly illegal immigration, appeal to public fears aboutimmigrants’ involvement in criminal activities.\n\nAre such fears justified? On the one hand, immigration policy screens the foreign-bornfor criminal history and assigns extra penalties to noncitizens who commit crimes, suggestingthat the foreign-born would be less likely than the U.S.-born to be involved in criminalenterprises. On the other hand, in California, immigrants are more likely than the U.S.-bornto be young and male; they are also more likely to have low levels of education. These characteristicsare typically related to criminal activity, providing some basis for concern that immigrantsmay be more criminally active than the U.S.-born. \n\nIn this issue of California Counts, we examine the effects of immigration on public safetyin California. In our assessments, we use measures of incarceration and institutionalization asproxies for criminal involvement. We find that the foreign-born, who make up about 35 percentof the adult population in California, constitute only about 17 percent of the adult prisonpopulation. Thus, immigrants are underrepresented in California prisonscompared to their representation in the overall population. In fact, U.S.-born adult men are incarcerated at a rate over two-and-a-half times greaterthan that of foreign-born men."
AUTHORS
Anne Morrison Piehl
Kristin F. Butcher
PUBLISHED
2008 in California Counts population trends and profiles
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
28
Undocumented Immigration and Rates of Crime and Imprisonment: Popular Myths and Empirical Realities
"The perception that the foreign-born, especially “illegal aliens,” are responsible for highercrime rates is deeply rooted in American public opinion and is sustained by media anecdote andpopular myth. In the absence of rigorous empirical research, stereotypes about immigrants andcrime often provide the underpinnings for public policies and practices, and shape public opinionand political behavior (Chávez 2001; Hagan and Palloni 1999; Lee 2003; Martínez and Valenzuela2006). Such stereotypes, reinforced through popular movies and television programs andfueled by media coverage of singular events, project an enduring image of immigrant communitiespermeated by criminal elements.\n\nBut these perceptions are not supported empirically; instead, as demonstrated below, theyare refuted by the preponderance of scientific evidence. Both contemporary and historical studies,including official crime statistics and victimization surveys since the early 1990s, data fromthe last three decennial censuses, national and regional surveys in areas of immigrant concentration,and investigations carried out by major government commissions over the past century, haveshown instead that immigration is associated with lower crime rates and lower incarcerationrates.\n\nIn what follows we examine the relationship of contemporary immigration, including undocumentedmigration, to crime and imprisonment. First, at the national level, we analyze changesin the rates of violent crimes and property crimes during the years of the surge in immigration.Next we look at the incarceration rates of young men eighteen to thirty-nine, comparing theforeign-born versus the U.S.-born by national origin and by education, and, among the foreignborn,by length of residence in the United States. The analysis compares the rates of incarcerationof foreign-born young men from nationalities the majority of whom are undocumented immigrants with less than a high school education (Mexicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans) versusthe rates for other immigrant nationalities as well as for native ethnic majority and minoritygroups. Finally, we summarize the available empirical evidence from a wide range of other studies,compare it to prevailing public perceptions, and note their implications for criminological theory,research, and public policy."
AUTHORS
John Hagan
G W Potter
M Blumberg
V E Kappeler
Ruben G Rumbaut
Rubén G. Rumbaut et al
PUBLISHED
2008 in Invited Address to the “Immigration Enforcement and Civil Liberties: The Role of Local Police” National Conference, Police Foundation, Washington, DC, August 21-22, 2008
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
29
Displaced, dispossessed, or lawless? Examining the link between ethnicity, immigration, and violence
"The goal of this paper is to build on the growing body of research on immigration and crime in two important ways. The first is to employ more specific measures of immigration than have been used in previous analyses. Specifically, this analysis includes measures of ethnicity, indicators that contain information about both nativity and country of origin, which have rarely been used in prior research. \n\nUsing ethnic-origin as a means of classifying a neighborhood's foreign-born population will promote a more nuanced understanding of the differential impacts of immigration on levels of violent criminal offending. Additionally, this research advances current knowledge on the link between immigration and crime by using more comprehensive crime indicators, including measures of non-lethal violence, which allows for a test of the degree to which the impact of immigration on violence varies across crime types. \n\nUsing data for Miami and Houston, two immigrant destination cities, the results illustrate the need for researchers to be sensitive to ethnic differences among foreign-born populations. The findings support the calls for a refinement of the disorganization theory, one that is sensitive to the differences among the foreign-born population and one that does not assume that immigration is a causally associated with levels of criminal violence."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Ramiro Martinez Jr.
Jacob I. Stowell
PUBLISHED
2007 in Aggression and Violent Behavior
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Mixed Results
Mixed Results
30
Immigration and Crime: The Effects of Immigration on Criminal Behavior
"Stowell examines the impact of immigration on violent crime. Crimiological theory, and particularly social disorganization theory, has held that immigration is inextricably linked to crime. Stowell tests whether patterns of neighborhood-level violence are partially attributable to the population characteristics of an area, and, in particular, to its nativity composition. \n\nHis analyses offer both support for and challenges to social disorganization theory. Consistent with theoretical expectations, immigration is found to be indirectly associated with levels of violence. Little support, however, is found for the notion that immigrants are a largely homogeneous population, or that immigration is positively associated with property crime. \n\nThe results call for a refinement of the disorganization theory, one that is sensitive to the differences among the foreign-born population and one that does not assume a negative impact of immigration on neighborhood social structure and violence."
AUTHOR
Jacob I. Stowell
PUBLISHED
2007 in LFB Scholarly Publishing
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Mixed Results
Mixed Results
31
The Myth of Immigrant Criminality and the Paradox of Assimilation
"Because many immigrants to the United States, especially Mexicans and Central Americans, are young men who arrive with very low levels of formal education, popular stereotypes tend to associate them with higher rates of crime and incarceration. The fact that many of these immigrants enter the country through unauthorized channels or overstay their visas often is framed as an assault against the “rule of law,” thereby reinforcing the impression that immigration and criminality are linked. This association has flourished in a post-9/11 climate of fear and ignorance where terrorism and undocumented immigration often are mentioned in the same breath.\n\nBut anecdotal impression cannot substitute for scientific evidence. In fact, data from the census and other sources show that for every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are the least educated. This holds true especially for the Mexicans, Salvadorans, and Guatemalans who make up the bulk of the undocumented population. What is more, these patterns have been observed consistently over the last three decennial censuses, a period that spans the current era of mass immigration, and recall similar national-level findings reported by three major government commissions during the first three decades of the 20th century. \n\nThe problem of crime in the United States is not “caused” or even aggravated by immigrants, regardless of their legal status. But the misperception that the opposite is true persists among policymakers, the media, and the general public, thereby undermining the development of reasoned public responses to both crime and immigration."
AUTHORS
Rubén G. Rumbaut
Walter A. Ewing
PUBLISHED
2007 in American Immigration Council
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
32
Crime on the Border: Immigration and Homicide in Urban Communities
"Studying El Paso, Miami, and San Diego over the years 1985-1995, Lee explores the complex relationship between ethnicity, immigration, and homicide. Popular opinion and sociological theory, particularly the social disorganization perspective, predict that immigration should increase levels of homicide where immigrants settle, but Lee's analysis (statistical, spatial, and temporal) generally finds that this is not the case. \n\nHis results cast doubt on the taken-for-granted idea that immigration disrupts communities, weakens social control, and increases homicide levels. Rather, recent arrivals appear to play a positive role in these three cities, suggesting that conventional theories of crime be re-examined in light of the potentially revitalizing impact of immigration."
AUTHOR
Matthew T. Lee
PUBLISHED
2007 in LFB Scholarly Publishing
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
33
Immigration and Incarceration: Patterns and Predictors of Imprisonment Among First- and Second-Generation Young Adults
"We noted earlier that, in the absence of rigorous empirical research, myths andstereotypes about immigrants and crime often provide the underpinnings for publicpolicies and practices, and shape public opinion and political behavior. Such myths andstereotypes tend to thrive in periods of increased immigration such as the present, whichhave historically been accompanied by nativist alarms, particularly during economicdownturns and when the immigrants have differed substantially from dominant nativegroups in race, language, religion and region of origin. We also pointed out that a newera of mass immigration—which by 2000 had produced a rapidly growing population offoreign birth or parentage already then exceeding 60 million persons—has coincided withan era of mass imprisonment in the United States, transforming paths to adulthood amongyoung men with little education. Because many immigrants, especially labor migrantsfrom Mexico and Central America and refugees from Southeast Asia, are young men whoarrive with very low levels of education, conventional wisdom—both in the form ofnativist stereotype as well as standard criminological theory—tends to associate themwith high rates of crime and incarceration. \n\nBut correlation is not causation, and such presumptions and assumptions aremisbegotten. Both the national and local-level findings presented in this chapter turnconventional wisdom on its head, and present a challenge to criminological theory. Forevery ethnic group without exception, the census data show an increase in rates of incarceration among young men from the foreign-born to the U.S.-born generations, andover time in the U.S. among the foreign-born—exactly the opposite of what is typicallyassumed. Paradoxically, incarceration rates are lowest among immigrant young men,even among the least educated among them, but they increase sharply by the secondgeneration, especially among the least educated—evidence of downward assimilation thatparallels the patterns observed for native minorities. \n\nThe proportions involved are nottrivial, but comprise millions of individuals—nationally in 2000, about 15 per cent of allyoung men 25 to 39 had failed to graduate from high school (including 31 per cent of theforeign-born who came as children under 18), and among them about 2 per cent of theforeign-born and 10 per cent of the U.S.-born were in prison. Still, nativity emerges inthis analysis as a stronger predictor of incarceration than education; when immigrationand generational status are taken into account, the association between (lower) educationand (higher) crime and incarceration rates is complicated in ways not anticipated bycanonical perspectives. It is in the context of the study of immigrant groups andgenerational cohorts that such paradoxes are revealed (Rumbaut 1997; Harris 1999),further underscoring the importance of connecting the research literatures on immigrationand on crime and imprisonment, which have largely ignored each other—to theimpoverishment of both, and to the enrichment of popular prejudice."
AUTHORS
Roberto G. Gonzales
Rubén G. Rumbaut
Rosaura Tafoya-Estrada
Charlie V. Morgan
Golnaz Komaie
PUBLISHED
2006 in Immigration and Crime: Race, Ethnicity, and Violence
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
34
Immigration and Crime Ethnicity, Race, and Violence
"The original essays in this much-needed collection broadly assess the contemporary patterns of crime as related to immigration, race, and ethnicity. Immigration and Crime covers both a variety of immigrant groups - mainly from Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America - and a variety of topics including: victimization, racial conflict, juvenile delinquency, exposure to violence, homicide, drugs, gangs, and border violence.\n \nThe volume provides important insights about past understandings of immigration and crime, many based on theories that have proven to be untrue or racially biased, as well as offering new scholarship on salient topics. Overall, the contributors argue that fears of immigrant crime are largely unfounded, as immigrants are themselves often more likely to be the victims of discrimination, stigmatization, and crime rather than the perpetrators."
AUTHORS
Ramiro Martinez Jr.
Abel Valenzuela, Jr.
PUBLISHED
2006 in NYU Press
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
35
The Immigration–Crime Relationship: Evidence across US Metropolitan Areas
"Despite popular commentary claiming a link between immigration and crime, empirical research exploring this relationship is sparse. Especially missing from the literature on immigration and crime is a consideration of how immigration affects rates of crime at the macro-level. Although individual-level studies of immigrant criminality and victimization tend to demonstrate that immigrants typically engage in less crime than their native-born counterparts, the effect of immigration on aggregate criminal offending is less clear. \n\nIn this research, we attempt to address this weakness in the literature by examining the effects of aspects of immigration on crime rates in metropolitan areas. We combine 2000 US Census data and 2000 Uniform Crime Report data to explore how the foreign-born population influences criminal offending across a sample of metropolitan areas. \n\nAfter controlling for a host of demographic and economic characteristics, we find that immigration does not increase crime rates, and some aspects of immigration lessen crime in metropolitan areas."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Charles Jaret
Robert M. Adelman
Harald E. Weiss
Lesley Williams Reid
PUBLISHED
2005 in Social Science Research
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
36
Segmented Assimilation, Local Context and Determinants of Drug Violence in Miami and San Diego: Does Ethnicity and Immigration Matter?
"Does the ethnic and immigrant composition of a community and existence of immigrant enclaves or barrios influence community level drug violence? This study explores the relationship between these and other factors in Miami and San Diego census tracts. We employ data about the distribution of Cubans, Central Americans, Haitians, Mexicans and Southeast Asians, controlling for social and economic influences of drug versus non-drug violence. \n\nWe also analyze the impact of various waves of immigration and immigrant communities to understand the circumstances under which drug violence occurs or is limited at the census tract level. \n\nThe findings lend some support to the positive and negative aspects of Portes and Rumbaut's (2001) segmented assimilation hypothesis in Miami and San Diego neighborhoods. The strength of this conclusion varies and is contingent upon ethnic composition, new versus old immigration, and the all-encompassing effects of economic deprivation"
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Ramiro Martinez Jr.
Amie L. Nielsen
Matthew T. Lee
PUBLISHED
2004 in International Migration Review
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Mixed Results
Mixed Results
37
Social Disorganization Revisited: Mapping the Recent Immigration and Black Homicide Relationship in Northern Miami
"This critical case study assesses the utility of spatial analysis based on maps rather than statistics for evaluating a fundamental premise of the social disorganization perspective: that immigration and ethnic heterogeneity weaken social control and increase community levels of crime. We investigate the relationship between the most recent wave of immigration and community levels of black homicide in the northern part of the city of Miami, an area that has received a large number of recent arrivals from Haiti and contains an established African American community. \n\nWhile quantitative methods have been used to explore this issue as part of an ongoing city-wide analysis, the current focus is on visual representations of the immigration/homicide linkage in the subsection of the city where the theoretically important target populations of African Americans and Haitians reside. \n\nKey findings are consistent with previous quantitative analyses that have demonstrated that immigration is not generally associated with higher community levels of homicide. These results call into question basic tenets of the social disorganization perspective while lending support to the concentrated disadvantage and immigration revitalization perspectives."
AUTHORS
Ramiro Martinez Jr.
Matthew T. Lee
PUBLISHED
2002 in Sociological Focus
Q2
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
38
AUTHOR
Daniel P. Mears
PUBLISHED
2002 in Federal Sentencing Reporter
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Couldn't Identify
Couldn't Identify
39
Does Immigration Increase Homicide? Negative Evidence from Three Border Cities
"Understanding the complex relationship between immigration and crime was once a core concern of American sociology. Yet the extensive post-1965 wave of immigration to the United States has done little to rekindle scholarly interest in this topic, even as politicians and other public figures advocate public policies to restrict immigration as a means of preventing crime. \n\nAlthough both popular accounts and sociological theory predict that immigration should increase crime in areas where immigrants settle, this study of Miami. El Paso. and San Diego neighborhoods shows that, controlling for other influences, immigration generally does not increase levels of homicide among Latinos and African Americans. Our results not only challenge stereotypes of the "criminal immigrant" but also the core criminological notion that immigration, as a social process, disorganizes communities and increases crime."
AUTHORS
Ramiro Martinez Jr.
Richard Rosenfeld
Matthew T. Lee
PUBLISHED
2001 in The Sociological Quarterly
SUSPECT SOURCE
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
40
Immigration and Urban Violence: The Link between Immigrant Latinos and Types of Homicide
"Objective: Despite the perceived relationship between immigration and crime, scholars have advanced largely contradictory images of the effects of Latino immigration to urban areas. The goal of this paper is to establish the link between the size of urban Latino immigrant populations and the frequency of specific types of Latino homicide victimization rates. Methods: This research examines data from the 1980 Supplemental Homicide Reports (SHR) and the 1980 decennial census. While these data might not represent a contemporary situation, they are the only reliable source of information from government statistics. Results: Ordinary least squares regression analysis provides some support for economic deprivation and social disorganization interpretations of violence; however, the role of immigration varies by homicide type (e.g., felony and acquaintance killings) and is limited. Conclusions: These findings stress the need for addressing the link between immigration, urban conditions, and types of Latino homicide victimization."
AUTHOR
Ramiro Martinez Jr.
PUBLISHED
2000 in Social Science Quarterly
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
NO DATA
NO DATA







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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do driver training programs reduce traffic injuries?
13 studies
Submitted by: DBuss 82

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?
5 studies
Submitted by: PSingh 0

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans" to consider?