Do obese children become obese adults?

Submitted by: Anonymous

Yes, obese children do become obese adults. The studies in this list for which we have identified answers are unanimous on this conclusion. Note that some of the studies in this list have been critiqued. (Links to critiques appear on the corresponding study summaries below).
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 5 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong.
5
YES ANSWERS
0
NO ANSWERS
0
MIXED RESULTS ANSWERS
0
INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE ANSWERS
0
NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 5 studies examining this question

All answers are assigned by State of K users. The label Mixed means that a study found some evidence to indicate that the answer to the question is "yes" and some evidence to indicate that the answer is "no". This label is often applied when a study uses two or more proxies to study the same phenomenon (i.e. firearm sales figures and self-reported firearm ownership rates as proxies for the prevalence of firearms) and the proxies yield different results when looking for correlations with another phenomenon (i.e. firearm-related deaths). Alternatively, the label may be applied if the phenomenon under study (i.e. whether breast milk improves cognitive function) is true for one group, but not another (i.e. true for girls, but not for boys). The label Insuff. Evidence means that a study found there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion regarding the question. The label No Data means that State of K wasn't able to identify the study's response to the question based on the information that was available. This label is often applied when the person creating the list does not have access to the full text and the answer isn't clear from the abstract.

All labels of Literature Reviews and Highly Regarded Source are assigned by State of K. The label Highly Regarded Source, as applied to journals, is a label assigned to the top 20 journals (as measured by the h-index) in various subcategories as classified and reported by Google Scholar. As applied to NGOs, the label is assigned to US NGOs ranked by the TTCSP Global Go To Think Tank Index Reports. The information contained in a source that is labelled "highly regarded" is not necessarily more accurate than information contained in a source without that label.

Literature Reviews
Although we recommend you consider all of the studies below, we believe the following studies are literature reviews, which survey and evaluate many studies on this question:

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 5
Sorted by publication year
1
Predicting adult obesity from childhood obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis
"A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to investigate the ability of simple measures of childhood obesity such as body mass index (BMI) to predict future obesity in adolescence and adulthood. Large cohort studies, which measured obesity both in childhood and in later adolescence or adulthood, using any recognized measure of obesity were sought. Study quality was assessed. Studies were pooled using diagnostic meta-analysis methods. Fifteen prospective cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. BMI was the only measure of obesity reported in any study, with 200,777 participants followed up. Obese children and adolescents were around five times more likely to be obese in adulthood than those who were not obese. Around 55% of obese children go on to be obese in adolescence, around 80% of obese adolescents will still be obese in adulthood and around 70% will be obese over age 30. Therefore, action to reduce and prevent obesity in these adolescents is needed. However, 70% of obese adults were not obese in childhood or adolescence, so targeting obesity reduction solely at obese or overweight children needs to be considered carefully as this may not substantially reduce the overall burden of adult obesity."
LITERATURE REVIEW
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
N. Woolacott
C. G. Owen
A. Llewellyn
M. Simmonds
PUBLISHED
2016 in Obesity Reviews
Q1
FUNDERS
NIHR HTA programme
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
2
Do obese children become obese adults: childhood predictors of adult disease
"Obesity is a multifactorial disorder influenced by genetic, behavioral, environmental and cultural factors. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in young people is increasing rapidly in both the developed and developing world and are considered today as a global epidemic. Recent studies show that obesity in adult life is heralded at birth and factors such as birth weight, adiposity rebound, socioeconomic status, early maturation and genetic predisposition may have a significant effect on the propensity to develop obesity in adulthood. Avoidance of accelerated weight gain in children should be investigated as a toll of adult obesity prevention."
LITERATURE REVIEW
AUTHORS
Tzotzas T
Krassas GE
PUBLISHED
2004 in Pediatric Endocrinology Reviews
Q2
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
3
Two decades of annual medical examinations in Japanese obese children: Do obese children grow into obese adults?
"OBJECTIVE: To investigate trends in frequency of obese children in Japan over two decades, the frequency of obese children who grow into obese adults and predictive factors for adult obesity.\n\nDESIGN: Annual cross-sectional studies for 22 y (1974-1995) with a follow-up study.\n\nSUBJECTS: Cross-sectional: Cumulatively 13,186 obese (% of standard body weight (SBW): > or = 120%) schoolchildren including 3158 extremely obese (> or = 140% of SBW) children out of 203,088 schoolchildren (age: 6-14 y) in Izumiohtsu City, Osaka, Japan. Follow-up: 151 initially obese children (initial age: 6-14 y and age at follow-up: 20-35 y) who lived in Izumiohtsu City. Control: 3552 Japanese men and 4631 Japanese women (age: 20-35 y).\n\nMEASUREMENTS: Cross-sectional: height, weight, trunk circumference, skin-fold thickness, blood pressure and blood biochemicals. Follow-up: height, weight, trunk circumference, skin-fold thickness during childhood, and body height and weight at follow-up. Adulthood obesity: > or = 120% of the average body mass indices (BMI) of the controls.\n\nRESULTS: Frequency of obese children increased from 5% to more than 10%, and that of extremely obese children increased from 1% to more than 2% during these 22 y. These increases were most prominent in the schoolboys aged 9-11 y. Prevalence of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in the extremely obese children did not change, and that of hypertension and abnormal liver function gradually decreased during these two decades. After coming of age, 32.2% of the initially obese boys (relative risk: 5.3) and 41.0% of the initially obese girls (relative risk: 6.7) remained obese. BMI, percentage of the SBW and skin-fold thickness at the biceps during childhood were significantly larger in currently-obese girls. Positive correlations were demonstrated between these variables and percentage SBW at follow-up.\n\nCONCLUSIONS: Childhood obesity is increasing in Japan, especially in boys aged 9-11 y. Approximately 32% of the obese boys and 41% of the obese girls grow into obese adults, and the degree of obesity is a predictive factor for adult obesity."
AUTHORS
K Tokunaga
S Fujioka
T Funahashi
S Yamashita
M Nishida
K Kotani et al
PUBLISHED
1997 in International Journal of Obesity
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
4
Do Obese Children Become Obese Adults? A Review of the Literature
"Background. Obese children may be at increased risk of becoming obese adults. To examine the relationship between obesity in childhood and obesity in adulthood, we reviewed the epidemiologic literature published between 1970 and July 1992. Comparison between studies was complicated by differences in study design, definitions of obesity, and analytic methods used. Although the correlations between anthropometric measures of obesity in childhood and those in adulthood varied considerably among studies, the associations were consistently positive. Results. About a third (26 to 41%) of obese preschool children were obese as adults, and about half (42 to 63%) of obese school-age children were obese as adults. For all studies and across all ages, the risk of adult obesity was at least twice as high for obese children as for nonobese children. The risk of adult obesity was greater for children who were at higher levels of obesity and for children who were obese at older ages. Conclusion. The wide range of estimates in this literature are, in part, due to differences in study designs, definitions of obesity, ages at which participants were measured, intervals between measurements, and population and cultural differences. © 1993 American Health Foundation and Academic Press."
LITERATURE REVIEW
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
T. Byers
D.F. Williamson
D.S. Freedman
R.J. Coates
D. Ivery
M.K. Serdula
PUBLISHED
1993 in Preventive Medicine
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
5
Childhood antecedents of adult obesity. Do chubby infants become obese adults?
"We investigated whether obese infants tend to become obese adults. Records of subjects born between 1945 and 1955 were reviewed to select three cohorts based on weight in the first six months of age, which exceeded the 90th percentile at least once, ranged between 25th and 75th percentiles or was below 10th percentile at least once. Three hundred and sixty-six subjects, now between 20 and 30 years of age, were located and their present height and weight determined. Thirty-six per cent of those exceeding the 90th percentile as infants were overweight adults, as compared to 14 per cent of the average age and light-weight infants. A significant increase (chi square = 17.2, p less than 0.001) in adult obesity was evident when the infant exceeded the 75th percentile that was independent of his height. Social class, educational level, and parental weight all correlated with adult weight (p less than 0.001). Sex and ordinal position of birth did not. The data suggest that infant weight correlates strongly with adult weight independently of other factors considered."
AUTHORS
McBride M
Goodman HC
Charney E
Pratt R.
Lyon B
PUBLISHED
1976 in New England Journal of Medicine
Q1
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
State of K periodically recommends additional studies to add to this list, both newly published and newly discovered. There are none for now, but check back another time.


QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Are presidential democracies more prone to becoming dictatorships than parliamentary democracies?
24 studies
Submitted by: SMendoza 75

Do formula-fed infants sleep more than breastfed infants?
15 studies
Submitted by: EZabel 110

Do formula-fed infants sleep more than breastfed infants?
15 studies
Submitted by: EZabel 110

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "do obese children become obese adults" to consider?