Do police body cameras increase assaults on police?

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Yes. Note that some studies in this list give us reason to question their conclusions. This may be because they were published in sources that are not peer-reviewed, are low ranked or not ranked at all, which may indicate limited editorial oversight. Carefully review the individual study summaries below for more information.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 2 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong. For medical questions, don't rely on the information here. Consult a medical professional.


Chart summary of 2 studies examining this question

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do police body cameras reduce use of force by the police?
22 studies
Submitted by: TMifune 55

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 2
Sorted by publication year
1
AUTHORS
Jayne Sykes
Paul Drover
Josh Young
Darren Henstock
Alex Sutherland
Barak Ariel et al
PUBLISHED
2017 in Journal of Experimental Criminology
High quality source
FUNDERS
University of Cambridge
Yes
Yes
2
Wearing body cameras increases assaults against officers and does not reduce police use of force: Results from a global multi-site experiment
"Police use of force is at the forefront of public awareness in many countries. Body-worn videos (BWVs) have been proposed as a new way of reducing police use of force, as well as assaults against officers. To date, only a handful of peer-reviewed randomised trials have looked at the effectiveness of BWVs, primarily focusing on use of force and complaints. We sought to replicate these studies, adding assaults against police officers as an additional outcome. Using a prospective meta-analysis of multi-site, multi-national randomised controlled trials from 10 discrete tests with a total population of +2 million, and 2.2 million police officer-hours, we assess the effect of BWVs on the rates of (i) police use of force and (ii) assaults against officers. Averaged over 10 trials, BWVs had no effect on police use of force (d = 0.021; SE = 0.056; 95% CI: –0.089–0.130), but led to an increased rate of assaults against officers wearing cameras (d = 0.176; SE = 0.058; 95% CI: 0.061–0.290). As there is evidence that cameras may increase the risk of assaults against officers, more attention should be paid to how these devices are implemented. Likewise, since other public-facing organisations are considering equipping their staff with BWVs (e.g. firefighters, private security, traffic wardens), the findings on risks associated with BWVs are transferrable to those occupations as well."
AUTHORS
Jayne Sykes
Paul Drover
Josh Young
Darren Henstock
Alex Sutherland
Barak Ariel et al
PUBLISHED
2016 in European Journal of Criminology
High quality source
Yes
Yes







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
Total additional studies: 20
State of K's algorithms generated the list of studies below based on the studies that were added to the above list. Some of these studies may also examine: "Do police body cameras increase assaults on police?" If a study examines this question, add it to the list by pressing the button.

Only add studies that examine the same question. Do not add studies that are merely on the same topic.

Literature review
Wearing body cameras increases assaults against officers and does not reduce police use of force: Results from a global multi-site experiment
"Police use of force is at the forefront of public awareness in many countries. Body-worn videos (BWVs) have been proposed as a new way of reducing police use of force, as well as assaults against officers. To date, only a handful of peer-reviewed randomised trials have looked at the effectiveness of BWVs, primarily focusing on use of force and complaints. We sought to replicate these studies, adding assaults against police officers as an additional outcome. Using a prospective meta-analysis of multi-site, multi-national randomised controlled trials from 10 discrete tests with a total population of +2 million, and 2.2 million police officer-hours, we assess the effect of BWVs on the rates of (i) police use of force and (ii) assaults against officers. Averaged over 10 trials, BWVs had no effect on police use of force (d = 0.021; SE = 0.056; 95% CI: –0.089–0.130), but led to an increased rate of assaults against officers wearing cameras (d = 0.176; SE = 0.058; 95% CI: 0.061–0.290). As there is evidence that cameras may increase the risk of assaults against officers, more attention should be paid to how these devices are implemented. Likewise, since other public-facing organisations are considering equipping their staff with BWVs (e.g. firefighters, private security, traffic wardens), the findings on risks associated with BWVs are transferrable to those occupations as well."
AUTHORS
Jayne Sykes
Paul Drover
Josh Young
Darren Henstock
Alex Sutherland
Barak Ariel et al
PUBLISHED
in European Journal of Criminology

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Police Body Cameras in Large Police Departments
"Body Worn Cameras are spreading worldwide, under the assumption
that police performance, conduct, accountability, and legitimacy, in the
eyes of the public, are enhanced as a result of using these devices. In
addition, suspects’ demeanor during police–public engagements is
hypothesized to change as a result of the video-recording of the encounter.
For both parties—officers and suspects—the theoretical mechanism that
underpins these behavioral changes is deterrence theory, self-awareness
theory, or both. Yet evidence on the efficacy of Body Worn Cameras
remains largely anecdotal, with only one rigorous study, from a small force
in Rialto, California, validating the hypotheses. How Body Worn Cameras
affect police–public interactions in large police departments remains
unknown, as does their effect on other outcomes, such as arrests. With one
Denver police district serving as the treatment area and five other districts
within a large metropolitan area serving as comparisons, we offer mixed
findings as in the Rialto Experiment, not least in terms of effect magnitudes.

Adjusted odds-ratios suggest a significant 35% lower odds for
citizens’ complaints against the police use of force, but 14% greater odds
for a complaint against misconduct, when Body Worn Cameras are used.
No discernable effect was detected on the odds of use of force at the
aggregate, compared to control conditions (OR=0.928; p>0.1). Finally,
arrest rates dropped significantly, with the odds of an arrest when Body
Worn Cameras not present is 18% higher than the odds under treatment
conditions. The outcomes are contextualized within the framework of
reactive emergency calls for service rather than proactive policing. We
further discuss officers’ decisions and the degree of the necessity of arrest
in policing more broadly, because the burden of proof for tangible evidence
necessary for making a legal arrest can be challenged with the evidence
produced by Body Worn Cameras: officers become “cautious” about arresting suspects when Body Worn Cameras are present. Limitations
associated with the lack of randomly assigned comparison units are
discussed, as well, with practical recommendations for future research on
Body Worn Cameras."
AUTHOR
Barak Ariel
PUBLISHED
2016 in Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology

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Assault cases in Maiduguri metropolis: A comparative study of police and accident and emergency units' records.
"Background: Information on the incidence of assault cases such as armed robbery, fights and house burglaries in most Nigerian cities are usually based on data collected from police records with little or no attempt to tap medical sources of information.

Objective: The aim of this study was therefore to compare the rate of recording of assault cases in the Maiduguri metropolitan area by the police at the Maiduguri central police station and the Accident and Emergency unit (A and E) of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital. Possible reasons why assault victims report or do not report to the police before seeking for treatment was also investigated.

Method: All victims of assault who attended the A and E unit of the hospital over a one year period (2002-2003) were interviewed and relevant data collected in a prepared form. Findings were compared with the record of assault cases within the same period at the Maiduguri central police station.

Result: 185 patients presented at A and E with body injuries due to assault during period of study. 108 (58%) informed the police before attending hospital, out of which majority (38.9%) claimed an 'instinctive reaction to do so' as the reason for informing the police. A significant proportion (61%) of those that did not inform the police claimed that the feeling that 'nothing will come out of it' as the reason. Only 41% of cases reported to the police were recorded. There was a tendency by the police to record cases where gun was used or the victim was a female.

Conclusion: The true picture of violence in most Nigerian cities can better be assessed by collecting data from both the relevant A and E department as well as from the police. The need for the populace to develop confidence and trust in the police cannot be overemphasised.

"
AUTHORS
A Tahir
H O Olasoji
U Na'Aya
PUBLISHED
2005 in The Nigerian postgraduate medical journal

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The impact of general police officer outlooks on their attitudes toward body-worn cameras
"PurposeThe past five years have seen a growth in studies of police body-worn cameras (BWCs). A large share of the research focused on individual officer attitudes toward these new law enforcement tools. The scholarship, however, focused almost exclusively on their positive and negative perceptions of body cameras or correlations between those attitudes and general officer characteristics. This study examined whether the influence of negative or “concerning” policing attitudes toward body cameras is mediated by other variables, such as officer outlooks toward law enforcement, officers' perceptions of citizen cooperation or their opinions of the public.Design/methodology/approachAn online survey was distributed to a convenience sample of police offices from two Northeastern police agencies.FindingsFindings indicate that the relationship between experience and concerning perceptions of body cameras is mediated by distrust in citizens and perceived civilian cooperation. Further, an office's outlooks regarding aggressive law enforcement tactics do not have a direct effect on concerning perceptions of body cameras, nor do they serve as a mediator between years of experience and concerning perceptions of body cameras.Originality/valueFindings uncover the nuance and complexity of studying and understanding police officer outlooks and perceptions of BWCs. Future experimental designs should include general outlook measures."
AUTHORS
Dae-Young Kim
Scott W. Phillips
Joseph Gramaglia
PUBLISHED
2020 in Policing: An International Journal

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Police Body Cameras: Mending Fences and How Pittsburgh is a Leading Example
"<p>After the police brutality deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Freddie Gray, amongst others, many call for increased accountability through police officer body-worn cameras. The following Note discusses the potential benefits of body camera use, the concerns that body cameras raise, relevant current and pending legislation in Pennsylvania, and whether police body cameras can be used to address race relations in connection with police officer brutality.</p>"
AUTHOR
Danielle Evans
PUBLISHED
in Pittsburgh Journal of Technology Law and Policy

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Body-worn cameras--Rapid adoption in a low-information environment?
"The article focuses on the rapid increase in the adoption of body-worn camera (BWC) technology as an tool of policing. Topics discussed include benefits of technology in policing, effects of technology on both the police organization and its relationship with the community, and the need of understanding the public's views on police body cameras."
AUTHOR
Cynthia Lum
PUBLISHED
in Translational Criminology

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The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial
"Police Body-Worn Cameras breaks down what’s known – and not known – about the promises, perils, and potential best practices around police body-worn cameras. Both law enforcement and civil rights advocates are excited by the potential of body-worn cameras to improve community policing and safety, but there is no empirical research to conclusively suggest that these will reduce the deaths of black male civilians in encounters with police. There are some documented milder benefits evident from small pilot studies, such as more polite interactions between police and civilians when both parties are aware they are being recorded, and decreased fraudulent complaints made against officers. Many uncertainties about best practices of body-worn camera adoption and use remain, including when the cameras should record, what should be stored and retained, who should have access to the footage, and what policies should determine the release of footage to the public. As pilot and permanent body-worn camera programs are implemented, it is important to ask questions about how they can be best used to achieve their touted goals. How will the implementation of these programs be assessed for their efficacy in achieving accountability goals? What are the best policies to have in place to support those goals?"
AUTHORS
Alex Sutherland
William A. Farrar
Barak Ariel
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Quantitative Criminology

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Introduction: The privacy and surveillance implications of police body cameras
"Body-worn cameras are being acquired and deployed by police departments around the world at an increasingly rapid pace. Like many technologies before them, body-worn cameras promise to change the way police work is done -- and, indeed, this is a primary claim made by civil liberties and other advocacy groups who are promoting their adoption as a means of "civilizing" the police and increasing police accountability (e.g., Stanley 2015). However, for many, the use of police body-worn cameras also raises interesting and vital privacy and surveillance-related concerns. Like other forms of surveillance, bodyworn cameras gather information and preserve it in a form amendable to processing and analysis but, unlike traditional CCTV or other static cameras, they can also make their way into private homes -- and anywhere else police choose to go -- and record everything they see and hear. These body cameras often come with a rarely discussed range of surveillance capacities that, precisely because they are mobile, raise unique privacy and other issues."
AUTHORS
Bryce Clayton Newell
Randy K. Lippert
PUBLISHED
in Surveillance and Society

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Body-worn images: Point-of-view and the new aesthetics of policing
"Police organisations across much of the Western world have eagerly embraced body-worn video camera technology, seen as a way to enhance public trust in police, provide transparency in policing activity, reduce conflict between police and citizens and provide a police perspective of incidents and events. Indeed, the cameras have become an everyday piece of police ‘kit’. Despite the growing ubiquity of the body-worn video camera, understandings of the nature and value of the audiovisual footage produced by police remain inchoate. Given body-worn video camera’s promise of veracity, this article is interested in the aesthetics of the camera images and the socio-cultural construction of the cameras as tellers of truth. We treat body-worn video cameras as image-making devices linked to techniques and technologies of power, which construct and frame police encounters in specific ways, and we suggest that the aesthetics and point-of-view nature of the image contribute greatly to the truth-value that the images acquire. This article begins by providing an historical context for the use of cameras and images in policing. We then introduce our framework of visual criminology and present theories of point-of-view as a construct in the diverse areas of gaming, pornography and the visual arts, as well as in television and cinema. The article deploys the cinematic use of point-of-view to unpack the affective impact and aesthetic of the police body-worn video camera footage. We suggest that viewers of the footage are placed in the position of the corporeally absent police officer whose experience has been recorded by a viewfinderless device. This generates a vacillating interplay between subjectivity and objectivity, given that the alleged faithful recording of the event by the body-worn video camera presents a singular perspective and incomplete document that may not necessarily capture the full context of the law enforcement event."
AUTHORS
Murray Lee
Carolyn McKay
PUBLISHED
2019 in Crime, Media, Culture: An International Journal

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A Descriptive Study on Police Body Cameras and Civil Liability Cases
"As a result of several highly publicized deaths at the hands of local police officers over the last two years, the public has placed increased pressure on the police for greater transparency and accountability. The use of police body cameras has been one suggested remedy. However, there is a minimal amount of quantitative research about the impacts of police body cameras on the community, the police, and their interactions. This explorative study examines the potential fiscal impact of body-worn cameras by investigating the relationship between the cost of a police body-worn camera program and the annual total of financial civil liability pay outs resulting from police misconduct lawsuits in Oakland, California, from 2003 to 2015. The impact of the body-worn camera program on officer assaults was also examined. While it was hypothesized that the cost of a body-worn camera program would be warranted due to a decrease in annual civil liability settlements, the results indicated that there was no effect. There was, however, a significant decrease in total assaults on police officers. Therefore, while a financial cost-benefit argument cannot be made based on the presently available data, officer safety appears to be greatly enhanced by a body-worn camera program, which can consequentially reduce the cost of healthcare, workman compensation, as well as costs related to missed work. However, due to the limited data and lack of control variables, the present study is only explorative and no definite cost-benefit conclusions to either direction should be drawn based on this study alone."
AUTHOR
Nicolas Berdjis
PUBLISHED

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Camera-friendly Policing: How the Police Respond to Cameras and Photographers
"How do police respond to the presence of cameras and photographers? Many speculative theories have been proposed offering mixed and sometimes contradictory answers to this question. Some theories propose that cameras will deter police misconduct, others suggest that cameras might improve police accountability, others suggest that police might respond to cameras by engaging in a risk-averse style of policing. Unfortunately, little empirical data is available to assess these theories. Drawing on data from a participant-observation research study conducted in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, this paper helps fill this gap in research and argues that police might be learning to adapt to cameras by engaging in what I call camera-friendly policing. This style of policing involves efforts to control how the police are perceived by photographers, and how they will be perceived by viewers of any recorded footage. In this paper, I outline the basic elements of the police’s camera-friendly tactics, and discuss the implications of these tactics for contemporary understandings of police visibility.  "
AUTHOR
Ajay Sandhu
PUBLISHED
2016 in Surveillance & Society

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Police Body-Worn Cameras
"Police Body-Worn Cameras breaks down what’s known – and not known – about the promises, perils, and potential best practices around police body-worn cameras. Both law enforcement and civil rights advocates are excited by the potential of body-worn cameras to improve community policing and safety, but there is no empirical research to conclusively suggest that these will reduce the deaths of black male civilians in encounters with police. There are some documented milder benefits evident from small pilot studies, such as more polite interactions between police and civilians when both parties are aware they are being recorded, and decreased fraudulent complaints made against officers. Many uncertainties about best practices of body-worn camera adoption and use remain, including when the cameras should record, what should be stored and retained, who should have access to the footage, and what policies should determine the release of footage to the public. As pilot and permanent body-worn camera programs are implemented, it is important to ask questions about how they can be best used to achieve their touted goals. How will the implementation of these programs be assessed for their efficacy in achieving accountability goals? What are the best policies to have in place to support those goals?"
AUTHORS
<!>danah <!>boyd
Alex Rosenblat
Alexandra Claudia Mateescu
PUBLISHED
in SSRN Electronic Journal

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Off the Record? Arrestee Concerns about the Manipulation, Modification, and Misrepresentation of Police Body-Worn Camera Footage
"Police body-worn cameras (BWC) have become the latest technological device introduced to policing on a wave of panacean promises. Recent research has reported the perspectives of police officers, police management, and the general public, but there have been no studies examining the views of police arrestees. Remedying this significant omission, this article presents findings generated from interviews with 907 individuals shortly after their arrest. Overall, we report a strong in principle support for police body-worn cameras amongst this cohort, particularly if the cameras can be operated impartially. The findings are organised into a trilogy of prominent and interrelated concerns voiced by the police detainees, namely the potential for the manipulation, modification, and misrepresentation of events captured by police body-worn cameras. The findings are discussed in a broader context of the “new visibility” of police encounters and contribute much needed findings to understand the culturally specific ways in which different publics experience and respond to visual surveillance."
AUTHORS
Emmeline Taylor Murray Lee
Emmeline Taylor
PUBLISHED
2019 in Surveillance & Society

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Police Officers’ Perceptions of Body-worn Cameras in Buffalo and Rochester
"Police body-worn cameras have been advanced as a solution to disparate perceptions among the citizenry, public officials, community leaders, and the police themselves in the highly contested arena of police-citizen encounters. As with previous innovations in policing it is important that programs or policies developed for street-level application be planned in advance, and the opinions of police officers should be understood prior to implementation. This study provides survey responses from police officers in Buffalo and Rochester regarding their perceptions of body-worn cameras. Survey items were borrowed from prior research in Phoenix and Los Angeles. It also included items intended to measure the officer’s opinions about examining camera images prior to writing a report, an issue that is the subject of some disagreement among policy makers. Findings suggest similar attitudes toward body cameras not only among Buffalo and Rochester police officers, but also with police officers in other agencies. Almost all respondents agree or strongly agree that police officers should have the ability to review body camera images prior to writing a report. The policy implications of this finding are discussed."
AUTHORS
Scott W. Phillips
Joseph A. Gramagila
PUBLISHED
in American Journal of Criminal Justice

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Police Officers’ Perceptions of Body-Worn Cameras in Buffalo and Rochester
"Police body-worn cameras have been advanced as a solution to disparate perceptions among the citizenry, public officials, community leaders, and the police themselves in the highly contested arena of police-citizen encounters. As with previous innovations in policing it is important that programs or policies developed for street-level application be planned in advance, and the opinions of police officers should be understood prior to implementation. This study provides survey responses from police officers in Buffalo and Rochester regarding their perceptions of body-worn cameras. Survey items were borrowed from prior research in Phoenix and Los Angeles. It also included items intended to measure the officer’s opinions about examining camera images prior to writing a report, an issue that is the subject of some disagreement among policy makers. Findings suggest similar attitudes toward body cameras not only among Buffalo and Rochester police officers, but also with police officers in other agencies. Almost all respondents agree or strongly agree that police officers should have the ability to review body camera images prior to writing a report. The policy implications of this finding are discussed."
AUTHORS
Scott W. Phillips
Joseph A. Gramagila
PUBLISHED
2017 in American Journal of Criminal Justice

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Self-Awareness to Being Watched and Socially-Desirable Behavior: A Field Experiment on the Effect of Body-Worn Cameras on Police Use-of-Force
"This study was conducted to determine whether body cameras worn by police officers would reduce the incidences of police-use-of-force. Findings from the study include the following: shifts in which officers did not use body cameras experienced twice as many incidents of police-use-of-force compared to shifts where officers used body cameras; and the number of complaints against the police for excessive use of force dropped from 28 complaints in the 12 months prior to the study to 3 during the study period. Researchers were unable to compute a treatment effect due to the large overall reduction in the number of complaints.

The study was conducted with the assistance of the Rialto Police Department. All 54 frontline officers in the department participated in the study. The officers were randomly assigned to either the control group – no use of body cameras, or the experimental group – use of body cameras. The officers in the experimental group were instructed to wear the body cameras during their entire shift and to record all public-police encounters. The content of the videotapes were analyzed to determine the effect of the camera on the incidences of police-use-of-force.

The findings from the analysis suggest that the presence of the cameras resulted in an almost 50 percent reduction in the total number of incidents of use of force, and that when cameras were not used (the control group), citizen complaints were almost 10 times higher compared to the experimental group. Suggestions for future research are discussed. Tables, figure, and references"
PUBLISHED

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Police Body Cameras in Large Police Departments.
"Body Worn Cameras are spreading worldwide, under the assumption that police performance, conduct, accountability, and legitimacy, in the eyes of the public, are enhanced as a result of using these devices. In addition, suspects' demeanor during police-public engagements is hypothesized to change as a result of the video-recording of the encounter. For both parties--officers and suspects--the theoretical mechanism that underpins these behavioral changes is deterrence theory, self-awareness theory, or both. Yet evidence on the efficacy of Body Worn Cameras remains largely anecdotal, with only one rigorous study, from a small force in Rialto, California, validating the hypotheses. How Body Worn Cameras affect police-public interactions in large police departments remains unknown, as does their effect on other outcomes, such as arrests. With one Denver police district serving as the treatment area and five other districts within a large metropolitan area serving as comparisons, we offer mixed findings as in the Rialto Experiment, not least in terms of effect magnitudes. Adjusted odds-ratios suggest a significant 35% lower odds for citizens' complaints against the police use of force, but 14% greater odds for a complaint against misconduct, when Body Worn Cameras are used. No discernable effect was detected on the odds of use of force at the aggregate, compared to control conditions (OR=0.928; p>0.1). Finally, arrest rates dropped significantly, with the odds of an arrest when Body Worn Cameras not present is 18% higher than the odds under treatment conditions. The outcomes are contextualized within the framework of reactive emergency calls for service rather than proactive policing. We further discuss officers' decisions and the degree of the necessity of arrest in policing more broadly, because the burden of proof for tangible evidence necessary for making a legal arrest can be challenged with the evidence produced by Body Worn Cameras: officers become "cautious" about arresting suspects when Body Worn Cameras are present. Limitations associated with the lack of randomly assigned comparison units are discussed, as well, with practical recommendations for future research on Body Worn Cameras. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]"
AUTHOR
BARAK ARIEL
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology

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The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial
"Police use-of-force continues to be a major source of international concern, inviting interest from academics and practitioners alike. Whether justified or unnecessary/excessive, the exercise of power by the police can potentially tarnish their relationship with the community. Police misconduct can translate into complaints against the police, which carry large economic and social costs. The question we try to answer is: do body-worn-cameras reduce the prevalence of use-of-force and/or citizens’ complaints against the police?

Methods
We empirically tested the use of body-worn-cameras by measuring the effect of videotaping police–public encounters on incidents of police use-of-force and complaints, in randomized-controlled settings. Over 12 months, we randomly-assigned officers to “experimental-shifts” during which they were equipped with body-worn HD cameras that recorded all contacts with the public and to “control-shifts” without the cameras (n = 988). We nominally defined use-of-force, both unnecessary/excessive and reasonable, as a non-desirable response in police–public encounters. We estimate the causal effect of the use of body-worn-videos on the two outcome variables using both between-group differences using a Poisson regression model as well as before-after estimates using interrupted time-series analyses.

Results
We found that the likelihood of force being used in control conditions were roughly twice those in experimental conditions. Similarly, a pre/post analysis of use-of-force and complaints data also support this result: the number of complaints filed against officers dropped from 0.7 complaints per 1,000 contacts to 0.07 per 1,000 contacts. We discuss the findings in terms of theory, research methods, policy and future avenues of research on body-worn-videos."
AUTHORS
Alex Sutherland
William A. Farrar
Barak Ariel
PUBLISHED
2015 in Journal of Quantitative Criminology

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Behind the lens: police attitudes toward body-worn cameras and organizational justice
FUNDERS
University of South Florida
"Body-worn cameras are a promising new development in policing. They have been linked to positive outcomes such as decreases in use of force and complaints against officers. However, this new technology has produced a number of issues that could thwart a successful body-worn camera program implementation. One issue is the extent to which officers possess positive attitudes toward using body-worn cameras. If officers do not view body-worn cameras positively, they may not use cameras to their full potential. This study examined the relationship between organizational justice and attitudes toward body-worn cameras in 492 police officers across 3 agencies using structural equation modeling. Findings indicated no observable relationship between perceptions of organizational justice and attitudes toward body-worn cameras. The implications for the organizational adoption of innovations in policy are discussed."
AUTHORS
Joseph A. Schafer
Matthew J. Giblin
George W. Burruss
Nathan L. Lawshe
PUBLISHED
2019 in Journal of Crime and Justice

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Implementation of medical examination and forensic analyses in the investigation of sexual assaults against adult women: A retrospective study of police files and medical journals
"Objective: To describe the implementation of medical examination and forensic analysis in the police investigation of sexual assaults, and compare police-reported cases with and without medico-legal examination of the victim.

Methods: A retrospective study of all police-reported sexual assaults against women in the county of Sør-Trøndelag, Norway, January 1997-June 2003. Information from the police files was merged with information from the only specialized health care system in the region, the Sexual Assault Care Centre (SACC), St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim.

Results: Of the 185 police-reported cases identified, 101 (55%) involved women examined at the SACC. A medical report was requested in 83% of the latter, while forensic analyses of biological samples from the victim's body were performed in a mere 29%. In cases without examination at the SACC, there was more likely assault outside the city, over one week's delay between the assault and police-reporting, over one assault reported, and assault coded as attempted rape, while vaginal penetration was less likely. Adjusting for delay of reporting, geographical closeness to health care remained predictive of medical examination. Only 16% of the cases were prosecuted.

Conclusion: The police requested a medical report in most cases where the victim had undergone examination, while a minority of collected biological samples was analyzed. Consequently, a vigilant and thorough documentation of mental state, physical injuries and history of assault should be emphasized.

"
AUTHORS
Lise Eilin Stene
Kari Ormstad
Berit Schei
PUBLISHED
2010 in Forensic Science International

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do police body cameras reduce use of force by the police?
22 studies
Submitted by: TMifune 55

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "Do police body cameras increase assaults on police" to consider?