Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?

Submitted by: GFarahani 0

No, deporting undocumented immigrants does not reduce crime.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 3 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong.
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YES ANSWERS
2
NO ANSWERS
1
MIXED RESULTS ANSWERS
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INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE ANSWERS
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NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 3 studies examining this question

All answers are assigned by State of K users. The label Mixed means that a study found some evidence to indicate that the answer to the question is "yes" and some evidence to indicate that the answer is "no". This label is often applied when a study uses two or more proxies to study the same phenomenon (i.e. firearm sales figures and self-reported firearm ownership rates as proxies for the prevalence of firearms) and the proxies yield different results when looking for correlations with another phenomenon (i.e. firearm-related deaths). Alternatively, the label may be applied if the phenomenon under study (i.e. whether breast milk improves cognitive function) is true for one group, but not another (i.e. true for girls, but not for boys). The label Insuff. Evidence means that a study found there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion regarding the question. The label No Data means that State of K wasn't able to identify the study's response to the question based on the information that was available. This label is often applied when the person creating the list does not have access to the full text and the answer isn't clear from the abstract.

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
10 studies
Submitted by: EZabel 110

Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?
5 studies
Submitted by: PSingh 0

Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
44 studies
Submitted by: LWong 0

Why do people believe that undocumented immigrants are a criminal threat?
3 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 3
Sorted by publication year
1
Immigration Enforcement, Policing, and Crime
"In 2008, the federal government introduced “Secure Communities,” a program that requires local law enforcement agencies to share arrestee information with federal immigration officials. We employed the staggered activation of Secure Communities to examine whether this program has an effect on crime or the behavior of local police. Supporters of the program argue that it enhances public safety by facilitating the removal of criminal aliens. Critics worry that it will encourage discriminatory policing. We found little evidence for the most ambitious promises of the program or for its critics’ greatest fears.\n \nAlthough a large body of evidence reports that municipal police can have an appreciable effect on crime, involving local police in federal immigration enforcement does not seem to offer measurable public safety benefits. Noncitizens removed through Secure Communities either would have been incapacitated even in the absence of the program or do not pose an identifiable risk to community safety."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Aaron Chalfin
Elina Treyger
Charles Loeffler
PUBLISHED
2014 in Criminology & Public Policy
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
2
Does Immigration Enforcement Reduce Crime? Evidence from “Secure Communities"
"Does immigration enforcement actually reduce crime? Surprisingly,little evidence exists either way—despite the fact that deporting noncitizens who commitcrimes has been a central feature of American immigration law since the early twentiethcentury. We capitalize on a natural policy experiment to address the question and, in theprocess, provide the first empirical analysis of the most important deportation initiative tobe rolled out in decades. \n\nThe policy initiative we study is “Secure Communities,” aprogram designed to enable the federal government to check the immigration status ofevery person arrested for a crime by local police. Before this program, the governmentchecked the immigration status of only a small fraction of arrestees. Since its launch, theprogram has led to over a quarter of a million detentions. We exploit the slow rollout ofthe program across more than 3,000 U.S. counties to obtain differences-in-differencesestimates of the impact of Secure Communities on local crime rates. We also use richdata on the number of immigrants detained under the program in each county andmonth—data obtained from the federal government through extensive FOIA requests—toestimate the elasticity of crime with respect to incapacitated immigrants. \n\nOur results show that Secure Communities led to no meaningful reductions in the FBI index crimerate. Nor has it reduced rates of violent crime—homicide, rape, robbery, or aggravatedassault. This evidence shows that the program has not served its central objective ofmaking communities safer."
AUTHORS
Adam B. Cox
Thomas J. Miles
PUBLISHED
2014 in Journal of Law & Economics
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
No
No
3
Addition by Subtraction? A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of Deportation Efforts on Violent Crime
"Contemporary criminological research on immigration has focused largely on one aspect of the immigration process, namely, the impact of in-migration (i.e., presence or arrival) of foreign-born individuals on crime. A related but understudied aspect of the immigration process is the impact that the removal of certain segments of the foreign-born population, and specifically undocumented or deportable aliens, has on aggregate levels of criminal violence. \n\nIn an effort to cast new light on the association between forced out-flows of immigrants and crime, we begin with descriptive analyses of patterns of deportation activity across the continental United States over an eleven-year period (1994–2004). We then examine the relationship between deportation activity and violent crime rates in a multilevel framework wherein Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) are situated within border patrol sectors. \n\nThe results of dynamic regression modeling indicate that changing levels of deportation activity are unrelated to changing levels of criminal violence for the sample of MSAs for the national at large. However, we also detect significant interactions by geographic location for selected violent offenses. For MSAs within sectors along the Mexican border, the deportation measure exhibits a significant negative effect on one indicator of criminal violence—the aggravated assault rate. For MSAs within non-border sectors, the effect of the deportation measures is significantly positive for the violence crime index and the aggravated assault rate. \n\nOverall, our analyses indicate that the relationship between deportation and criminal violence is complex and dependent on local context."
AUTHORS
Lawrence E. Raffalovich
Michael S. Barton
Stephen F. Messner
Jacob I. Stowell
PUBLISHED
2013 in Law and Society Review
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Mixed Results
Mixed Results







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
State of K periodically recommends additional studies to add to this list, both newly published and newly discovered. There are none for now, but check back another time.


QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
10 studies
Submitted by: EZabel 110

Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?
5 studies
Submitted by: PSingh 0

Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
44 studies
Submitted by: LWong 0

Why do people believe that undocumented immigrants are a criminal threat?
3 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime" to consider?