Does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime?

Submitted by: PSingh 0

Yes, granting legal status to undocumented immigrants does reduce their likelihood of committing crime. The studies in this list for which we have identified answers are unanimous on this conclusion.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 5 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong.
5
YES ANSWERS
0
NO ANSWERS
0
MIXED RESULTS ANSWERS
0
INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE ANSWERS
0
NO DATA ON ANSWER


Chart summary of 5 studies examining this question

All answers are assigned by State of K users. The label Mixed means that a study found some evidence to indicate that the answer to the question is "yes" and some evidence to indicate that the answer is "no". This label is often applied when a study uses two or more proxies to study the same phenomenon (i.e. firearm sales figures and self-reported firearm ownership rates as proxies for the prevalence of firearms) and the proxies yield different results when looking for correlations with another phenomenon (i.e. firearm-related deaths). Alternatively, the label may be applied if the phenomenon under study (i.e. whether breast milk improves cognitive function) is true for one group, but not another (i.e. true for girls, but not for boys). The label Insuff. Evidence means that a study found there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion regarding the question. The label No Data means that State of K wasn't able to identify the study's response to the question based on the information that was available. This label is often applied when the person creating the list does not have access to the full text and the answer isn't clear from the abstract.

All labels of Literature Reviews and Highly Regarded Source are assigned by State of K. The label Highly Regarded Source, as applied to journals, is a label assigned to the top 20 journals (as measured by the h-index) in various subcategories as classified and reported by Google Scholar. As applied to NGOs, the label is assigned to US NGOs ranked by the TTCSP Global Go To Think Tank Index Reports. The information contained in a source that is labelled "highly regarded" is not necessarily more accurate than information contained in a source without that label.


QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
10 studies
Submitted by: EZabel 110

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
44 studies
Submitted by: LWong 0

Why do people believe that undocumented immigrants are a criminal threat?
3 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 5
Sorted by publication year
1
Clicking on Heaven’s Door: The Effect of Immigrant Legalization on Crime
"We estimate the e ect of immigrant legalization on the crime rate of immigrants in Italy by exploiting an ideal regression discontinuity design: xed quotas of residence permits are available each year, applications must be submitted electronically on speci c \Click Days", and are processed on a rst-come, rst-served basis until the available quotas are exhausted. Matching data on applications with individual- level criminal records, we show that legalization reduces the crime rate of legalized immigrants by 0.6 percentage points on average, on a baseline crime rate of 1.1 percent."
AUTHOR
Paolo Pinotti
PUBLISHED
2017 in American Economic Review
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
2
Immigrant Crime and Legal Status: Evidence from Repeated Amnesty Programs
"Do general amnesty programs lead to reductions in the crime rate among immigrants? Weanswer this question by exploiting both cross-sectional and time variation in the number ofimmigrants legalized generated by the enactment of repeated amnesty programs between1990 and 2005 in Italy. We address the potential endogeneity of the “legalization treatment”"by instrumenting the actual number of legalized immigrants with alternative predictedmeasures based on past amnesty applications patterns and residential choices ofdocumented and undocumented immigrants. \n\nWe find that, in the year following an amnesty,regions in which a higher share of immigrants obtained legal status experienced a greaterdecline in non-EU immigrant crime rates, relative to other regions. The effect is statisticallysignificant but relatively small and not persistent. In further results, we fail to find anyevidence of substitution in the criminal market from other population groups - namely, EUimmigrants and Italian citizens - and we observe a small and not persistent reduction in totaloffenses."
AUTHOR
Francesco Fasani
PUBLISHED
2016 in IZA Discussion Papers, No. 10235
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
3
Effects of Immigrant Legalization on Crime
"I examine the effects that the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), which legalized almost 3 million immigrants, had on crime in the United States. I exploit the IRCA's quasi-random timing as well as geographic variation in the intensity of treatment to isolate causal impacts. I find decreases in crime of 3-5 percent, primarily due to decline in property crimes, equivalent to 120,000-180,000 fewer violent and property crimes committed each year due to legalization. I calibrate a labor market model of crime, finding that much of the drop in crime can be explained by greater labor market opportunities among applicants."
AUTHOR
Scott R. Baker
PUBLISHED
2015 in American Economic Review
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
4
Immigration, Employment Opportunities, and Criminal Behavior
"We take advantage of provisions of the Immigration Reform andControl Act of 1986 (IRCA), which granted legal resident status tolong-time unauthorized residents but created new obstacles toemployment for more recent immigrants, to explore howemployment opportunities affect criminal behavior. \n\nExploiting administrative data on the criminal justice involvement ofindividuals in San Antonio, Texas and using a difference-indifferencesstrategy, we find evidence of an increase in felonycharges filed against residents most likely to be affected by IRCA’semployment regulations. Our results suggest a strong relationshipbetween access to legal jobs and criminal behavior."
AUTHORS
Emily Owens
Matthew Freedman
Sarah Bohn
PUBLISHED
2015 in Working Paper
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes
5
Legal Status and the Criminal Activity of Immigrants
"We exploit exogenous variation in legal status following the January2007 European Union enlargement to estimate its effect on immigrantcrime. We difference out unobserved time-varying factors by(i) comparing recidivism rates of immigrants from the “new” and“candidate” member countries; and (ii) using arrest data on foreigndetainees released upon a mass clemency that occurred in Italyin August 2006. The timing of the two events allows us to setup adifference-in-differences strategy. \n\nLegal status leads to a 50 percentreduction in recidivism, and explains one-half to two-thirds of theobserved differences in crime rates between legal and illegal immigrants."
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
AUTHORS
Giovanni Mastrobuoni
Paolo Pinotti
PUBLISHED
2015 in American Economic Journal: Applied Economics
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
Yes
Yes







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
State of K periodically recommends additional studies to add to this list, both newly published and newly discovered. There are none for now, but check back another time.


QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do undocumented immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
10 studies
Submitted by: EZabel 110

Does deporting undocumented immigrants reduce crime?
3 studies
Submitted by: GFarahani 0

Do legal immigrants commit more crime than native-born Americans?
44 studies
Submitted by: LWong 0

Why do people believe that undocumented immigrants are a criminal threat?
3 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "does granting legal status to undocumented immigrants reduce their likelihood of committing crime" to consider?