How can I increase breast milk expression?

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This list contains 12 studies that examine this question. The 12 studies were published from 1996 to 2017.


Chart summary of 12 studies examining this question
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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 12
Sorted by publication year
1
AUTHORS
P. A. Uikey
Palak Agrawal
Surekha Khandale
PUBLISHED
2017 in International Journal of Reproduction, Contraception, Obstetrics and Gynecology
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2
Preterm infants’ mothers’ initiation and frequency of breast milk expression and exclusive use of mother's breast milk in neonatal intensive care units
"AIM AND OBJECTIVES To describe preterm infants' mothers' expressing practices and exclusive use of mother's breast milk in neonatal intensive care settings, as well as to explore whether mothers' and infants' characteristics are predictors of the mother's inadequate expressing practices and non-exclusive use of mothers' breast milk. BACKGROUND Use of their own mother's milk decreases preterm infants' mortality and morbidity, but expression is exhausting for the mothers. Mothers' and infants' characteristics are associated with milk output and exclusive breastfeeding at discharge, as well as later in infancy. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. METHODS The data were collected through questionnaires in two neonatal units. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine whether mothers' and infants' characteristics are predictors of late expression initiation (> six hours from birth), inadequate expression frequency (≤ six times per a day), and non-exclusive use of own mother's milk. RESULTS The sample consisted of 129 mothers. One-third of the mothers had adequate expression practices. Half of the infants exclusively received their mother's own breast milk. Previous neonatal intensive care unit experience, poor psychological well-being, an infant's male gender, caesarean section, and high gestational birth age were significant predictors of late expression initiation. None of the studied variables were significant predictors of inadequate expression frequency. Furthermore, lack of previous expression experience, financial woes, and high gestational age were predictors of non-exclusive use of own mother's milk. CONCLUSIONS Expression practices, as well as use of own mother's milk, were suboptimal. High gestational age was associated with both late expression initiation and non-exclusive breast milk use. The mothers maintained expression regardless of their well-being. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE Counseling and support is needed in order to avoid suboptimal expression practices. Special attention should be paid to mothers with moderately preterm infants, caesarean delivery, poor psychological well-being, and financial woes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved."
AUTHORS
Riikka Ikonen
Eija Paavilainen
Mika Helminen
Marja Kaunonen
PUBLISHED
2017 in Journal of Clinical Nursing
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
3
AUTHORS
A Divya
Lekha Viswanath
Anju Philip
PUBLISHED
2016 in Journal of SAFOG
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NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
4
Breast milk and the best means of expression
"When newborn breastfed babies have problems sucking or latching on, it is often recommended that their mothers express breast milk. Observational studies suggest that use of breast pumps may lead to shorter overall duration of breastfeeding than if milk is expressed by hand. Some studies show breast pumping yields more milk than hand expression, although the opposite may be true immediately after birth. In a randomised controlled trial, 68 mothers of full-term newborns aged 12–36 h with feeding difficulties were randomised to 15 min of either bilateral hand pumping or hand expression.[1] The median volume expressed in a single session did not differ significantly. Mothers randomised to hand express were more comfortable being seen expressing than those pumping. At two months, significantly more women expressing by hand (96.1%) than by pump (72.7%) were still breastfeeding. This study should be extended to mothers of preterm babies."
PUBLISHED
2013 in Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
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5
Associations between high prepregnancy body mass index, breast-milk expression, and breast-milk production and feeding
"Background: Breast-milk expression is widely practiced by Amer-ican mothers, but little is known about who expresses milk, how expression affects breastfeeding, or whether overweight or obese women, who have less breastfeeding success than do normal-weight women, express milk differently. Objectives: We investigated 1) whether breast-milk expression be-havior differed by body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2) category and 2) whether the different breastfeeding behaviors of overweight (BMI: 25 and ,30) and obese (BMI: 30) women resulted in different breastfeeding outcomes. Design: The subjects (n = 2288) provided information on BMI and breast-milk production, feeding, and expression in mail-in question-naires as part of the Infant Feeding Practices Study II. Longitudinal and cross-sectional data were analyzed by using regression proce-dures adjusted for confounding. Results: Women of different BMI categories overall did not differ in whether, when, or why they expressed breast milk. Before 2 mo postpartum, however, obese women were more likely (P = 0.04, unadjusted) to try milk expression and were less likely (P = 0.01, unadjusted) to express milk successfully. In addition, overweight or obesity was associated (P , 0.03, unadjusted) with a shorter dura-tion of breast-milk production only in women who never expressed milk. In overweight or obese women, those who ever expressed milk had longer durations of breastfeeding (P , 0.003, unadjusted) than did those who never expressed milk. Conclusions: Breast-milk expression behaviors may differ by mater-nal BMI category only in the early postpartum period. In addition, breast-milk expression may reduce differences between BMI catego-ries in the duration of breastfeeding and support longer durations of breastfeeding."
AUTHORS
S. A. Leonard
J. Labiner-Wolfe
S. R. Geraghty
K. M. Rasmussen
PUBLISHED
2011 in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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6
Breast milk expression and maintenance in mothers of very low birth weight infants: supports and barriers.
"The study objective was to identify patterns of factors that supported or hindered initiation of breast milk expression and maintenance of breast milk production after the birth of a very low birth weight (VLBW) infant in a sample of US women with varied prenatal infant feeding intentions. In-depth interviews were conducted 1 to 6 months after delivery in 32 women who initiated breast milk expression after encouragement from hospital staff. Pregnancy complications, anxiety regarding their infant's health, and lack of privacy interfered with initiation of milk expression. After hospital discharge, using manual or small electric breast pumps, travel to the neonatal intensive care unit, return to work, and difficulty with time management interfered with maintenance of breast milk production. Family support, positive attitudes toward pumping, and anticipation of breastfeeding supported maintenance of breast milk production. From these data emerge points of intervention where additional support could improve mothers' experiences and increase duration of breast milk feeding."
AUTHORS
Paula Sisk
Sara Quandt
Nikki Parson
Jenna Tucker
PUBLISHED
2010 in Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association
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7
AUTHORS
Linda Glynn
Louise Goosen
PUBLISHED
2005 in Journal of Human Lactation
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
8
Effect of vacuum profile on breast milk expression using an electric breast pump.
"The authors compared milk expression using 5 experimental vacuum patterns and a commercially available vacuum pattern ranging in cycle times (20 to 78 cycles/min) and vacuum curve dynamics in 30 mothers using an experimental, software-controlled electric breast pump. The volume of milk removed over 5 minutes differed (P = .0072) between patterns (range = 62.8 +/- 6.6 mL to 47.2 +/- 5.1 mL). However, there was no difference in the percentage of available milk removed (range = 99.4% +/- 15.1% to 70.6% +/- 8.6%). The rate of milk removal differed between patterns at both the beginning (1 minute) and end (1.5 minutes) of the expression period (P < .05). Peak vacuum chosen differed between patterns (P = .0085) but was not related to either the volume or percentage of available milk expressed. Breastfeeding characteristics did not differ between poor and successful expressers. These results show that breast milk expression by an electric breast pump can be influenced by the vacuum pattern."
AUTHORS
Leon R Mitoulas
Ching Tat Lai
Lyle C Gurrin
Michael Larsson
Peter E Hartmann
PUBLISHED
2002 in Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association
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9
Efficacy of breast milk expression using an electric breast pump.
"The authors compared breastfeeding and expression characteristics in 30 mothers of exclusively breastfeeding, healthy term infants. Mean (+/- SD) volume per breastfeed from one breast was 71.8 +/- 26.3 mL, and mean duration per breastfeed for one breast was 16.6 +/- 10.5 minutes. Mean volume of milk expressed in 5 minutes from one breast was 60.6 +/- 39.0 mL and corresponded to the expression of 99.4 +/- 82.6% of the milk stored in the breast. The rate of milk expression differed greatly between mothers (P = .0001) but remained constant for the first 2.5 minutes before decreasing with time (P = .0001). These results show the mean breastfeed volume was similar to the volume of milk expressed in a 5-minute period. Furthermore, this study is the first to establish protocols that allow for the objective determination of breast pump efficacy."
AUTHORS
Leon R Mitoulas
Ching Tat Lai
Lyle C Gurrin
Michael Larsson
Peter E Hartmann
PUBLISHED
2002 in Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
10
Randomized Trial Comparing the Efficacy of a Novel Manual Breast Pump With a Standard Electric Breast Pump in Mothers Who Delivered Preterm Infants
"OBJECTIVE: The benefits of human milk for preterm infants are widely recognized, yet technological advances in milk expression have been slow. We compared the efficacy of a standard electric pump (EP; Egnell) used in 94% of United Kingdom neonatal units with a novel manual pump (MP; Avent ISIS) designed to operate more physiologically by simulating the infant's compressive action on the areola during breastfeeding. METHODS: We randomized 145 women who delivered infants of <35 weeks' gestation to use the MP or the EP and measured total milk volume expressed while using the randomized pump during the infant's hospital stay, pattern of milk output and creamatocrit of milk expressed during a test period in the second week, and pump characteristics by maternal questionnaire. RESULTS: Mothers who used the EP, who frequently double pumped, showed shorter expression times but produced no more milk than mothers who used the MP. When both pumped sequentially, however, mothers who used the MP showed significantly greater milk flow and total volume over 20 minutes. Creamatocrit was unaffected by pump type. The MP was rated significantly higher than the EP on 5 major characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: When compared on equal terms (sequential pumping), mothers who used the MP showed greater milk flow, perhaps reflecting more physiologic pump design. Even with double pumping, mothers who used the EP did not advantage their infants with greater milk production. We believe that this novel, effective MP, preferred by mothers and costing a fraction of the EP price, reflects a significant advance in milk expression for high-risk infants.breast pumps, randomized trial, preterm infants."
AUTHORS
M. S. Fewtrell
P. Lucas
S. Collier
A. Singhal
J. S. Ahluwalia
A. Lucas
PUBLISHED
2001 in PEDIATRICS
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
11
Randomized study comparing the efficacy of a novel manual breast pump with a mini-electric breast pump in mothers of term infants.
"The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of a mini-electric pump (MEP) and a novel manual breast pump (MP) designed to operate more physiologically. Sixty term breastfeeding mothers used the MP and MEP in randomized order 8 weeks postpartum, expressing for 10 minutes from each breast. Milk volume, fat content, and pattern of milk flow were measured. Mothers rated pump characteristics by questionnaire. There was no significant difference in the milk volume or fat content when mothers used the pumps in randomized order. The MP was rated significantly better overall and more comfortable and pleasant to use. Significantly more mothers kept the MP than the MEP. Despite the greater complexity and expense of the MEP, the pumps showed similar efficacy. The MP was preferred by mothers. The novel, more physiological operation of the MP represents an advance in milk expression technology."
AUTHORS
M Fewtrell
P Lucas
S Collier
A Lucas
PUBLISHED
2001 in Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
12
Manual and pump methods of expression of breast milk
"This study was designed to compare two methods of breast milk expression, namely, the manual and the pumping method using a hand-held cylindric pump. The parameters evaluated were (i) the output of breast milk during milk expression sessions of 15 minutes' duration, and, (ii) the subjective preference of the method by the mothers. In the first phase, 22 mothers whose infants were on gavage feeding in the nursery, had 3 sittings each by the two methods on 4th and 5th postnatal days (66 expression). It was seen that the use of breast pump (Medela) was associated with significantly higher volume of breast milk expressed per session (41.57 +/- 16.05 ml vs. 21.7 +/- 10.5 ml, P < 0.001). In the second phase, 14 mothers had such sessions (42 each) not only on the 4th and 5th postnatal days, but lso on days 8 and 9. It was again seen that, the volume of breast milk expressed was greater by the pump method than the manual expression (on day 5 and 6 (46.8 +/- 26.3 ml vs 31.2 +/- 15.5 ml, P < 0.01) as well as on day 8 and 9 (50.40 +/- 11.2 ml vs 38.49 +/- 13.4 ml, P < 0.01). Subjectively, the pump expression was preferred by the mothers on day 4 {&} 5, while the manual expression was the preference on days 8 {&} 9. The use of breast pump is more efficient than the manual system of expression of breast milk among mothers whose infants are not directly breast-fed. It is recommended that in case the mothers prefer to use the manual method, let them express as much milk as possible by this method initially, and then follow it up with a short period of pumping to ensure complete evacuation of breasts."
AUTHORS
Vinod K. Paul
Meharban Singh
Ashok K. Deorari
Jamsine Pacheco
Urmil Taneja
PUBLISHED
1996 in The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
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