Is there a homefield advantage in baseball?

Submitted by: JAloni 117

Yes. The studies in this list for which we have identified answers are unanimous on this conclusion. Note that some studies in this list give us reason to question their conclusions. This may be because they were published in sources that are not peer-reviewed, are low ranked or not ranked at all, which may indicate limited editorial oversight. Alternatively, it may be because they were criticized in a published article or produced by a financially interested or ideologically motivated source. Carefully review the individual study summaries below for more information.
This short answer was generated by aggregating the answers that each of the 5 studies below gave to the question (as indicated by State of K members) and adjusting for source quality and other factors. If key studies are missing or the answers attributed to individual studies are incorrect, the above answer could be wrong. For medical questions, don't rely on the information here. Consult a medical professional.


Chart summary of 5 studies examining this question

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Is there really a home-field advantage in sports?
46 studies
Submitted by: THunter 88

Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball?
6 studies
Submitted by: JAloni 117

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What additional question do you want someone who searches for "Is there a homefield advantage in baseball" to consider?

SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 5
Sorted by publication year
1
Home Advantage in Retractable-Roof Baseball Stadia
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills
Q4
Yes
Yes
2
The Home Advantage in Major League Baseball
"© Perceptual & Motor Skills 2015.Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional sports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper advances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to support the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual sports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in impaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the extent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport requires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the home team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage. Interactions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less common in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B. Jones
PUBLISHED
2015 in Perceptual and Motor Skills
Q4
Yes
Yes
3
AUTHOR
Yoshinori TAKIGAMI
PUBLISHED
2010 in The Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Japanese Psychological Association
UNRANKED SOURCE
Yes
Yes
4
Home Field (Dis)Advantage and the "Last-Ups" Effect
"The rules of baseball have an intriguing quirk that other major-league sports do not have, namely, the sequential order of play which always affords the last at-bat to the home team. We became interested in exploring the strategic effects of this quirk. If there is a significant strategic advantage (or disadvantage) to having the last at-bat, it may show up as a difference in win percentage of the home team in close games, where strategy is more important, compared to the win percentage of home teams in games which are blowouts. Our paper is motivated by attempting to exploit the "natural experiment" of comparing close games to blowouts.In previous literature, the possibility that strategic effects might come into play because of the sequential nature of the play is only partially recognized. For example, Carmichael and Thomas state as their third reason for home field advantage, "rules factors that may extend special privileges explicitly favoring the home team, such as the home team in baseball and softball always having the last 'bat.'"1 These authors only recognize the possibility that the last at-bat might give the home team the advantage when there is reason to believe that it is the visitors who actually have the advantage. Indeed, among baseball, basketball, hockey, football, and soccer, the strategic effect due to sequential play is only operative in baseball, yet baseball has the lowest home-field advantage of these five major sports.The difference between the home winning percentage and the away winning percentage is statistically significantly positive for all major sports, but differs from sport to sport. In baseball, from 1901–2002, the average difference per team per year was 0.082, which for a .500 team in a 162 game season would lead approximately to records of 44-37 at home and 37-44 on the road."
AUTHORS
Stephen Shmanske
Franklin Lowenthal
PUBLISHED
2009 in NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture
UNRANKED SOURCE
Yes
Yes
5
An Analysis of the Home-Field Advantage in Major League Baseball Using Logit Models: Evidence from the 2004 and 2005 Seasons
"Using data from the 4,858 baseball games that were played in the major leagues during the 2004 and 2005 seasons, four logit regression models that measure the likelihood of a team winning a game are estimated. Of particular interest is the effect of being the home team. As expected, the results indicate that a home-field advantage does exist in the major leagues, but only under certain circumstances. Specifically, the strength of the home-field advantage varies with the number of runs scored by the home team and with the run differential between the winning and losing team. The probability of a home team winning a game increases as it scores more runs, but it increases at a decreasing rate. Also, for a given number of runs scored, a home team is more likely to win a game than a visiting team. The home-field advantage is strongest in games where the run differential between the winning team and losing team is one run. It is weaker in games where the run differential is two runs and is non-existent in games where the run differential is three runs or more."
AUTHORS
William Levernier
Anthony G. Barilla
PUBLISHED
2007 in Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports
Q2
Couldn't Identify
Couldn't Identify







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
Total additional studies: 17
State of K's algorithms generated the list of studies below based on the studies that were added to the above list. Some of these studies may also examine: "Is there a homefield advantage in baseball?" If a study examines this question, add it to the list by pressing the button.

Only add studies that examine the same question. Do not add studies that are merely on the same topic.

Home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia.
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
2012 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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Home Advantage in Retractable-roof Baseball Stadia
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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Home Advantage in Retractable-Roof Baseball Stadia
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for openair, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia.

A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to openair stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility.

© Perceptual & Motor Skills 2012."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
2012 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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The Home Advantage in Major League Baseball
"Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional\nsports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper\nadvances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to\nsupport the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual\nsports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in\nimpaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the\nextent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport\nrequires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the\nhome team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage.\nInteractions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less\ncommon in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B. Jones
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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Literature review
THE HOME ADVANTAGE IN MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL.
"Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional sports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper advances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to support the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual sports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in impaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the extent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport requires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the home team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage. Interactions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less common in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B Jones
PUBLISHED
2015 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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The relationship between spit tobacco and baseball
"The use of spit tobacco (ST) is often associated with athletics at all levels. The sport of baseball has a long history and connection with the use of ST at all levels from as young as little league where a bubble gum product called Big League Chew prepares young mouths for the use of chewing tobacco to the minor and major league teams. The custom of using ST in baseball began more than a century ago when players on dusty baseball fields used the product to keep their mouths moist during games. It became more popular in the 1970s and 1980s in response to an aggressive marketing and promotion campaign targeted toward professional baseball players. This practice continued through the years because baseball is an activity that allows ST use through unique practice game situations, including the opportunity to use ST products during competition with less concern for hazardous conditions. The lulls in activity and a decreased risk of contact and or collision allow for increased ST consumption during games. Athletes at all levels of baseball are role models for young people, especially boys and should take advantage of that role and act as a positive role model for fans through diminished or complete cessation of ST use and participation in public education campaigns against the use of ST. The sport of baseball has a long history and connection with the use of ST. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)"
AUTHOR
Ted Eaves
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sport and Social Issues

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Influence of Ball Type on Home Advantage in French Professional Soccer
"The home advantage has been consistently found in soccer matches, but conclusive evidence of the origin of this home advantage has yet to be identified. One factor often thought to contribute is familiarity with a local facility. The present study examined home advantage in the French professional soccer male championships (20 teams in each Ligue 1 and 2) and explored the influence of soccer ball type on this phenomenon. Whether it is knowing how a soccer ball rolls on a particular grass surface or some other aspect, the home team can react to the situation better if they know from experience what is likely to happen. The results suggest that type of soccer ball may have an influence on home advantage. Confounding factors are discussed."
AUTHOR
Fabrice E. M. Dosseville
PUBLISHED
2007 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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Influence of Ball Type on Home Advantage in French Professional Soccer
"The home advantage has been consistently found in soccer matches, but conclusive evidence of the origin of this home advantage has yet to be identified. One factor often thought to contribute is familiarity with a local facility. The present study examined home advantage in the French professional soccer male championships (20 teams in each Ligue 1 and 2) and explored the influence of soccer ball type on this phenomenon. Whether it is knowing how a soccer ball rolls on a particular grass surface or some other aspect, the home team can react to the situation better if they know from experience what is likely to happen. The results suggest that type of soccer ball may have an influence on home advantage. Confounding factors are discussed."
AUTHOR
Fabrice E. M. Dosseville
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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Home advantage in Australian soccer
"Objectives: The aims of this study were to quantify the magnitude of home advantage (HA) in Australian soccer and to investigate how home-team crowd support and away-team travel may contribute to it.

Design: A paired design was used wherein each match contributed two observations, one for the home team and one for the away team.

Methods: The data used in this study were all matches from the first seven seasons (2005/06-2011/12) of the Australian A-League - the major soccer league in Australia. Repeated measures Poisson regression analysis was used to investigate the effect that crowd size and density, distance and direction travelled by away teams, and crossing time zones may have on HA.

Results: HA in terms of the percentage of competition points gained by home teams in the A-League averaged 58% over the study period. HA increased significantly with increasing number of time zones crossed by away teams (p<. 0.001). HA also appeared to increase with increasing crowd size (p= 0.07) but only up to about 20,000 persons. Crowd density, distance travelled and direction travelled were not independently associated with HA.

Conclusions: The present results suggest that in soccer competitions where time zones are crossed, travel effects such as jet lag may play an even greater role in HA than home-team crowd support. Travel management programs aimed at reducing the effects of jet lag could significantly improve away team performance in Australian soccer. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia."
AUTHOR
Chris Goumas
PUBLISHED
2014 in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

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Home advantage in Australian soccer
"Objectives: The aims of this study were to quantify the magnitude of home advantage (HA) in Australian soccer and to investigate how home-team crowd support and away-team travel may contribute to it. Design: A paired design was used wherein each match contributed two observations, one for the home team and one for the away team. Methods: The data used in this study were all matches from the first seven seasons (2005/06-2011/12) of the Australian A-League - the major soccer league in Australia. Repeated measures Poisson regression analysis was used to investigate the effect that crowd size and density, distance and direction travelled by away teams, and crossing time zones may have on HA. Results: HA in terms of the percentage of competition points gained by home teams in the A-League averaged 58% over the study period. HA increased significantly with increasing number of time zones crossed by away teams (p<. 0.001). HA also appeared to increase with increasing crowd size (p= 0.07) but only up to about 20,000 persons. Crowd density, distance travelled and direction travelled were not independently associated with HA. Conclusions: The present results suggest that in soccer competitions where time zones are crossed, travel effects such as jet lag may play an even greater role in HA than home-team crowd support. Travel management programs aimed at reducing the effects of jet lag could significantly improve away team performance in Australian soccer. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia."
AUTHOR
Chris Goumas
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

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Comparison of Home Advantage in College and Professional Team Sports in the United States.
"Home advantage in seven American college team sports (baseball, basketball, football, hockey, lacrosse, soccer and women's basketball) was compared with professional leagues in the United States for the same sports and for the same time period. A total of 81,063 college games and 22,477 professional games were analyzed for the four seasons 2006-07 to 2009-10. There was a significant home advantage, as measured by home winning percentage, in all sports, both college and professional. The overall home advantage in college sports was significantly greater than in professional sports (p<0.015). The mean difference was 3.73 home winning percentage points, being greatest for baseball, basketball, and hockey (all p<0.001). Plausible explanations for these results include differences in college and professional competition in terms of familiarity with local conditions, referee bias, territoriality and psychological factors. However, the influence of travel fatigue was inconclusive. Only for soccer was the home advantage greater for professionals. This was the only sport where crowd size appeared to be having an effect. In addition the rules of college soccer allow more substitution and hence greater coach intervention than in professional soccer, a factor that could also be reducing home advantage."
AUTHORS
Miguel A Gómez
Richard Pollard
PUBLISHED
2015 in Collegium Antropologicum

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Home advantage in soccer: A retrospective analysis
"See, stats, and: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/20272586 Home : A analysis Article Impact : 2. 25: 10.1080/ 02640418608732122: PubMed CITATIONS 166 READS 679 1 : Richard California , San 52 , 948 SEE Available : Richard Retrieved : 03"
AUTHOR
Richard Pollard
PUBLISHED
1986 in Journal of Sports Sciences

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HOME ADVANTAGE IN TURKISH PROFESSIONAL SOCCER
"Home advantage is known to play an important role In the Outcome of professional soccer games and to vary considerably worldwide. In the Turkish Super League over the last 12 years, 61.5% of the total points gained have been won by the home team, a figure similar to the worldwide average and to the Premier League in England. It is lower (57.7%) for games played between teams from Istanbul and especially high for games involving teams from cities in the more remote and ethnically distinct parts of Turkey (Van and Diyarbakir). Match performance data show that although home teams in Turkey take 26%) more shots at goal than away teams, the success rates for shots do not differ. For fouls and disciplinary cards, home and away teams do not differ significantly in Turkey, a finding that differs from games in England, perhaps due to less referee bias."
AUTHOR
AYLIN SECKIN
PUBLISHED
2008 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

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Home Advantage in Soccer: A Retrospective Analysis
AUTHOR
Richard Pollard
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sports Sciences

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Calculating the home advantage in soccer leagues
"A recent article published in the Journal of Human Kinetics (Saavedra et al., 2013) was based on a flawed methodology when calculating the home advantage values in soccer leagues. This led to incorrect calculations, false conclusions and some misleading results about home advantage in 52 soccer leagues of UEFA countries over a 10 year period. The aim of this letter was to explain these flaws and to make sure future research would not be influenced by the subsequent results and conclusions that had been presented"
AUTHORS
Miguel ??ngel G??mez Ruano
Richard Pollard
Miguel ??ngel G??mez
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Human Kinetics

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Calculating the Home Advantage in Soccer Leagues
"A recent article published in the Journal of Human Kinetics (Saavedra et al., 2013) was based on a flawed methodology when calculating the home advantage values in soccer leagues. This led to incorrect calculations, false conclusions and some misleading results about home advantage in 52 soccer leagues of UEFA countries over a 10 year period. The aim of this letter was to explain these flaws and to make sure future research would not be influenced by the subsequent results and conclusions that had been presented"
AUTHORS
Richard Pollard
Miguel-Ángel Gómez
PUBLISHED
2014 in Journal of Human Kinetics

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Home advantage and crowd size in soccer: A worldwide study
"Home advantage is well documented in a wide range of team sports including association football (soccer). Crowd support appears to play a major role although the mechanisms through which it operates are unclear. Match data from major international club soccer competitions in four confederations of the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) were used to investigate the role crowd size plays in home advantage and how its effect may vary worldwide. Unadjusted home advantage did not vary significantly between continents. However, controlling for differences in crowd size produced highly significant (p<0.001) variation, with crowd adjusted home advantage -in terms of the percentage of goals scored by home teams -ranging from 56% in Europe to 67% in North America. For all continents combined, home advantage increased by 1.5% per each 10% increase in crowd size (p< 0.001). The effect of crowd size on home advantage in North America was twice that in other continents (p=0.03). A logarithmic association appears to best describe the effect of crowd size on home advantage in soccer. Directions for future research into home advantage include investigating the effects of other crowd factors such as density and proximity."
AUTHOR
C. Goumas
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sport Behavior

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Is there really a home-field advantage in sports?
46 studies
Submitted by: THunter 88

Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball?
6 studies
Submitted by: JAloni 117

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "Is there a homefield advantage in baseball" to consider?