Why do legislatures adopt voter ID laws?

Submitted by: JFranks 92

This list contains 7 studies that examine this question. The 7 studies were published from 2013 to 2017.


Chart summary of 7 studies examining this question

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 7
Sorted by publication year
1
AUTHORS
Daniel R. Biggers
Michael J. Hanmer
PUBLISHED
2017 in American Politics Research
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
2
The Determinants of State Legislator Support for Restrictive Voter ID Laws
"We examine state legislator behavior on restrictive voter identification (ID) bills from 2005 to 2013. Partisan polarization of state lawmakers on voter ID laws is well known, but we know very little with respect to other determinants driving this political division. A major shortcoming of extant research evaluating the passage of voter ID bills stems from using the state legislature as the unit of analysis. We depart from existing scholarship by using the state legislator as our unit of analysis, and we cover the entirety of the period when restrictive voter ID laws became a frequent agenda item in state legislatures. Beyond the obviously significant effect of party affiliation, we find a notable relationship between the racial composition of a member's district, region, and electoral competition and the likelihood that a state lawmaker supports a voter ID bill. Democratic lawmakers representing substantial black district populations are more opposed to restrictive voter ID laws, whereas Republican legislators with substantial black district populations are more supportive. We also find Southern lawmakers (particularly Democrats) are more opposed to restrictive voter ID legislation. In particular, we find black legislators in the South are the least supportive of restrictive voter ID bills, which is likely tied to the historical context associated with state laws restricting electoral participation. Finally, in those state legislatures where electoral competition is not intense, polarization over voter ID laws is less stark, which likely reflects the expectation that the reform will have little bearing on the outcome of state legislative contests."
AUTHORS
William D. Hicks
Seth C. McKee
Daniel A. Smith
PUBLISHED
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
3
A Principle or a Strategy? Voter Identification Laws and Partisan Competition in the American States
"We undertake a comprehensive examination of restrictive voter ID legislation in the American states from 2001 through 2012. With a dataset containing approximately one thousand introduced and nearly one hundred adopted voter ID laws, we evaluate the likelihood that a state legislature introduces a restrictive voter ID bill, as well as the likelihood that a state government adopts such a law. Voter ID laws have evolved from a valence issue into a partisan battle, where Republicans defend them as a safeguard against fraud while Democrats indict them as a mechanism of voter suppression. However, voter ID legislation is not uniform across the states; not all Republican-controlled legislatures have pushed for more restrictive voter ID laws. Instead, our findings show it is a combination of partisan control and the electoral context that drives enactment of such measures. While the prevalence of Republican lawmakers strongly and positively influences the adoption of voter ID laws in electorally competitive states, its effect is significantly weaker in electorally uncompetitive states. Republicans preside over an electoral coalition that is declining in size; where elections are competitive, the furtherance of restrictive voter ID laws is a means of maintaining Republican support while curtailing Democratic electoral gains."
AUTHORS
William D. Hicks
Seth C. McKee
Mitchell D. Sellers
Daniel A. Smith
PUBLISHED
2015 in Political Research Quarterly
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
4
Politics is Local: State Legislator Voting on Restrictive Voter Identification Legislation
"The marked increase in restrictive voter identification (ID) laws since the 2010 elections reveals the extreme partisan polarization in those state legislatures advancing this reform. Unlike previous studies that examine state-level factors expected to influence passage of restrictive voter ID bills, this study is the first to investigate the question using the state legislator as the unit of analysis. Multivariate analysis of the voting behavior of state legislators shows which kinds of district-level factors increase or decrease their likelihood of supporting stricter voter ID laws. Given the differentiable coalitions favoring Democratic and Republican candidates, certain partisan-aligned district demographics influence state lawmaker support for restrictive voter ID legislation. Race in particular is a major cleavage conditioning support for restrictive voter ID laws. Unlike the mixed findings generated by macro-level studies, this article provides convincing evidence that the size of the black district population negatively influences the likelihood that a Democratic legislator votes in favor of a restrictive voter ID bill, but positively affects the probability that a Republican lawmaker votes yes. The findings in this study illuminate the contextual factors that influence legislator voting on this salient election reform."
AUTHOR
Seth C McKee
PUBLISHED
2015 in Research & Politics
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
5
The Statistical Role in Voter Identification (ID) Laws
"Many public policy issues have at their core statistical issues. It is extremely important that these issues be addressed by statisticians, and their findings must be explained to the public, legislators, and judges. The recent Voter Identification bills passed by a number of state legislatures are a case in point. This article summarizes the statistical issues at the heart of the recent court case between the State of Texas and the Federal government over the Voter ID legislation passed in that state. The Federal court ruled that, “all of Texas's evidence… is some combination of invalid, irrelevant, and unreliable.”"
AUTHOR
David A. Marker
PUBLISHED
2014 in Statistics and Public Policy
SUBMITTED BY
testerlevel1 14
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
6
The Politics of Race and Voter ID Laws in the States: The Return of Jim Crow?
"Abstract Does partisan and racial context have an effect on the likelihood that states will adopt stringent requiremen voting? Our duration analysis shows that Republican governments increase the likelihood that a new law req citizens to have a photo ID to vote will be passed. This effect is weakened by minority group size. We then whether the adoption of voter ID regulations affects turnout across racial groups. Our analysis, using state-and the Current Population Survey (CPS) November Supplement File (NSF) for 1980 to 2010, offers little evi"
AUTHORS
Rene R. Rocha
Tetsuya Matsubayashi
PUBLISHED
2014 in Political Research Quarterly
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
7
Jim Crow 2.0? Why States Consider and Adopt Restrictive Voter Access Policies
"ABSTRACT Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in state legislation likely to reduce access for some voters, including photo identification and proof of citizenship requirements, registration restrictions, absentee ballot voting restrictions, and reductions in early voting. Political operatives often ascribe malicious motives when their opponents either endorse or oppose such legislation. In an effort to bring empirical clarity and epistemological standards to what has been a deeply-charged, partisan, and frequently anecdotal debate, we use multiple specialized regression approaches to examine factors associated with both the proposal and adoption of restrictive voter access legislation from 2006–2011. Our results indicate that proposal and passage are highly partisan, strategic, and racialized affairs. These findings are consistent with a scenario in which the targeted demobilization of minority voters and African Americans is a central driver of recent legislative developments. We discuss the implications of these results for current partisan and legal debates regarding voter restrictions and our understanding of the conditions incentivizing modern suppression efforts. Further, we situate these policies within developments in social welfare and criminal justice policy that collectively reduce electoral access among the socially marginalized."
AUTHORS
Keith G. Bentele
Erin E. O'Brien
PUBLISHED
2013 in Perspectives on Politics
SUBMITTED BY
JAloni 105
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE







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