Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball?

Submitted by: JAloni 105

This list contains 3 studies that examine this question. The 3 studies were published from 2005 to 2015.


Chart summary of 3 studies examining this question

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Is there a homefield advantage in baseball?
5 studies
Submitted by: JAloni 105

Do baseball players perform worse in years where they perceive themselves to be under-compensated?
6 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Is there really a home-field advantage in sports?
46 studies
Submitted by: THunter 88

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SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 3
Sorted by publication year
1
The Home Advantage in Major League Baseball
"© Perceptual & Motor Skills 2015.Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional sports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper advances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to support the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual sports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in impaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the extent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport requires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the home team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage. Interactions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less common in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B. Jones
PUBLISHED
2015 in Perceptual and Motor Skills
Q4
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
2
Home Field (Dis)Advantage and the "Last-Ups" Effect
"The rules of baseball have an intriguing quirk that other major-league sports do not have, namely, the sequential order of play which always affords the last at-bat to the home team. We became interested in exploring the strategic effects of this quirk. If there is a significant strategic advantage (or disadvantage) to having the last at-bat, it may show up as a difference in win percentage of the home team in close games, where strategy is more important, compared to the win percentage of home teams in games which are blowouts. Our paper is motivated by attempting to exploit the "natural experiment" of comparing close games to blowouts.In previous literature, the possibility that strategic effects might come into play because of the sequential nature of the play is only partially recognized. For example, Carmichael and Thomas state as their third reason for home field advantage, "rules factors that may extend special privileges explicitly favoring the home team, such as the home team in baseball and softball always having the last 'bat.'"1 These authors only recognize the possibility that the last at-bat might give the home team the advantage when there is reason to believe that it is the visitors who actually have the advantage. Indeed, among baseball, basketball, hockey, football, and soccer, the strategic effect due to sequential play is only operative in baseball, yet baseball has the lowest home-field advantage of these five major sports.The difference between the home winning percentage and the away winning percentage is statistically significantly positive for all major sports, but differs from sport to sport. In baseball, from 1901–2002, the average difference per team per year was 0.082, which for a .500 team in a 162 game season would lead approximately to records of 44-37 at home and 37-44 on the road."
AUTHORS
Franklin Lowenthal
Stephen Shmanske
PUBLISHED
2009 in NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture
SUSPECT SOURCE
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
NO INFO ON SOURCE QUALITY
3
Batting last as a home advantage factor in men's NCAA tournament baseball
"In baseball and softball, there is a rule that allows the home team to have the last at-bat and thus the final opportunity to win the game. However, in tournament play, this rule is often set aside and, instead, batting order is decided by other means (e.g. tournament rules, the flip of a coin). The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the batting last rule on game outcome in NCAA men's regional tournament baseball. It was hypothesized that host (i.e. home) teams would win a greater percentage of the games in which they batted last compared with when they batted first. This hypothesis was not supported. Closer examination of the last inning of play showed home teams were no more likely to have won the game during their last bat than visitors playing other visitors. The results suggest that the batting last rule contributes minimally, if at all, to home advantage in NCAA tournament baseball."
AUTHORS
Matt Kwan
Jeff Obara
Steven R Bray
PUBLISHED
2005 in Journal of Sports Sciences
Q1
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE
HIGHLY REGARDED SOURCE







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
Total additional studies: 2
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Literature review
Highly regarded source
Home Advantage in Sport
"This review identifies the most likely causes of home advantage. The results of previous studies have identified 4 factors thought to be responsible for the home advantage. These can be categorised under the general headings of crowd, learning, travel and rule factors. From the accumulated evidence, rule factors were found to play only a minor role (in a limited number of sports) in contributing to home advantage. Studies investigating the effect of learning factors found that little benefit was to be gained from being familiar with the local conditions when playing at home. There was evidence to suggest that travel factors were responsible for part of the home advantage, provided the journey involved crossing a number of time zones. However, since high levels of home advantage are observed within countries where travel distances are not great, travel factors were not thought to be a major cause of home advantage. The evidence from studies investigating crowd factors appeared to provide the most dominant causes of home advantage. A number of studies provide strong evidence that home advantage increases with crowd size, until the crowd reaches a certain size or consistency (a more balanced number of home and away supporters), after which a peak in home advantage is observed. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain these observations: either (i) the crowd is able to raise the performance of the home competitors relative to the away competitors; or (ii) the crowd is able to influence the officials to subconsciously favour the home team. The literature supports the latter to be the most important and dominant explanation. Clearly, it only takes 2 or 3 crucial decisions to go against the away team or in favour of the home team to give the side playing at home the 'edge'."
AUTHORS
Roger L. Holder
Alan M. Nevill
PUBLISHED
1999 in Sports Medicine

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Highly regarded source
The Home Advantage
You can view the abstract at: https://doi.org/10.2307/2577461
AUTHORS
Stephen F. Barsky
Barry Schwartz
PUBLISHED
1977 in Social Forces

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QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Is there a homefield advantage in baseball?
5 studies
Submitted by: JAloni 105

Do baseball players perform worse in years where they perceive themselves to be under-compensated?
6 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Is there really a home-field advantage in sports?
46 studies
Submitted by: THunter 88

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball" to consider?