Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball?

Submitted by: JAloni 111



Chart summary of 3 studies examining this question

All answers are assigned by State of K users.

All labels of Literature Reviews and source quality are assigned by State of K. For academic journals, the label "Q[NUMBER]" is an indication of the quality of the publication. The "NUMBER" refer to the best quartile in which the journal appeared among all the subjects in which the journal was ranked by Scimago Institutions Rankings. For example, if a journal was ranked in the third quartile (Q3) in infectious diseases, but in the second quartile in Ebola studies (Q2), you would see "Q2". The best quartile is "Q1". Publications other than academic journals may be labeled as "Highly Regarded Sources". Government sources receive this label as do NGOs ranked by the TTCSP Global Go To Think Tank Index Reports. The information contained in a source that is labeled "highly regarded" or "Q1" is not necessarily more accurate than information contained in a source without that label, but these are rough guides to source quality.

Additional Recommended Studies Not in this List (yet)

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do baseball players perform worse in years where they perceive themselves to be under-compensated?
6 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Is there really a home-field advantage in sports?
46 studies
Submitted by: THunter 88

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball" to consider?

SUMMARIES OF STUDIES
Total studies in list: 3
Sorted by publication year
1
The Home Advantage in Major League Baseball
"© Perceptual & Motor Skills 2015.Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional sports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper advances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to support the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual sports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in impaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the extent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport requires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the home team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage. Interactions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less common in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B. Jones
PUBLISHED
2015 in Perceptual and Motor Skills
Q4
2
Home Field (Dis)Advantage and the "Last-Ups" Effect
"The rules of baseball have an intriguing quirk that other major-league sports do not have, namely, the sequential order of play which always affords the last at-bat to the home team. We became interested in exploring the strategic effects of this quirk. If there is a significant strategic advantage (or disadvantage) to having the last at-bat, it may show up as a difference in win percentage of the home team in close games, where strategy is more important, compared to the win percentage of home teams in games which are blowouts. Our paper is motivated by attempting to exploit the "natural experiment" of comparing close games to blowouts.In previous literature, the possibility that strategic effects might come into play because of the sequential nature of the play is only partially recognized. For example, Carmichael and Thomas state as their third reason for home field advantage, "rules factors that may extend special privileges explicitly favoring the home team, such as the home team in baseball and softball always having the last 'bat.'"1 These authors only recognize the possibility that the last at-bat might give the home team the advantage when there is reason to believe that it is the visitors who actually have the advantage. Indeed, among baseball, basketball, hockey, football, and soccer, the strategic effect due to sequential play is only operative in baseball, yet baseball has the lowest home-field advantage of these five major sports.The difference between the home winning percentage and the away winning percentage is statistically significantly positive for all major sports, but differs from sport to sport. In baseball, from 1901–2002, the average difference per team per year was 0.082, which for a .500 team in a 162 game season would lead approximately to records of 44-37 at home and 37-44 on the road."
AUTHORS
Stephen Shmanske
Franklin Lowenthal
PUBLISHED
2009 in NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture
UNRANKED SOURCE
3
Batting last as a home advantage factor in men's NCAA tournament baseball
"In baseball and softball, there is a rule that allows the home team to have the last at-bat and thus the final opportunity to win the game. However, in tournament play, this rule is often set aside and, instead, batting order is decided by other means (e.g. tournament rules, the flip of a coin). The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the batting last rule on game outcome in NCAA men's regional tournament baseball. It was hypothesized that host (i.e. home) teams would win a greater percentage of the games in which they batted last compared with when they batted first. This hypothesis was not supported. Closer examination of the last inning of play showed home teams were no more likely to have won the game during their last bat than visitors playing other visitors. The results suggest that the batting last rule contributes minimally, if at all, to home advantage in NCAA tournament baseball."
AUTHORS
Steven R Bray
Matt Kwan
Jeff Obara
PUBLISHED
2005 in Journal of Sports Sciences
High quality source







ADDITIONAL STUDIES TO CONSIDER ADDING TO LIST
Total additional studies: 29
State of K's algorithms generated the list of studies below based on the studies that were added to the above list. Some of these studies may also examine: "Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball?" If a study examines this question, add it to the list by pressing the button.

Only add studies that examine the same question. Do not add studies that are merely on the same topic.

Literature review
Home Advantage in Sport
"This review identifies the most likely causes of home advantage. The results of previous studies have identified 4 factors thought to be responsible for the home advantage. These can be categorised under the general headings of crowd, learning, travel and rule factors. From the accumulated evidence, rule factors were found to play only a minor role (in a limited number of sports) in contributing to home advantage. Studies investigating the effect of learning factors found that little benefit was to be gained from being familiar with the local conditions when playing at home. There was evidence to suggest that travel factors were responsible for part of the home advantage, provided the journey involved crossing a number of time zones. However, since high levels of home advantage are observed within countries where travel distances are not great, travel factors were not thought to be a major cause of home advantage. The evidence from studies investigating crowd factors appeared to provide the most dominant causes of home advantage. A number of studies provide strong evidence that home advantage increases with crowd size, until the crowd reaches a certain size or consistency (a more balanced number of home and away supporters), after which a peak in home advantage is observed. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain these observations: either (i) the crowd is able to raise the performance of the home competitors relative to the away competitors; or (ii) the crowd is able to influence the officials to subconsciously favour the home team. The literature supports the latter to be the most important and dominant explanation. Clearly, it only takes 2 or 3 crucial decisions to go against the away team or in favour of the home team to give the side playing at home the 'edge'."
AUTHORS
Roger L. Holder
Alan M. Nevill
PUBLISHED
1999 in Sports Medicine

Add to List
The Home Advantage
You can view the abstract at: https://doi.org/10.2307/2577461
AUTHORS
Stephen F. Barsky
Barry Schwartz
PUBLISHED
1977 in Social Forces

Add to List
Pay Dirt
"Why would a Japanese millionaire want to buy the Seattle Mariners baseball team, when he has admitted that he has never played in or even seen a baseball game? Cash is the answer: major league baseball, like professional football, basketball, and hockey, is now big business with the potential to bring millions of dollars in profits to owners. Not very long ago, however, buying a sports franchise was a hazardous investment risked only by die-hard fans wealthy enough to lose parts of fortunes made in other businesses. What forces have changed team ownership from sports-fan folly to big-business savvy? Why has The Wall Street Journal become popular reading in pro sports locker rooms? And why are sports pages now dominated by economic clashes between owners and players, cities with franchises and cities without them, leagues and players' unions, and team lawyers and players' lawyers? In answering these questions, James Quirk and Rodney Fort have written the most complete book on the business and economics of professional sports, past and present. Pay Dirt offers a wealth of information and analysis on the reserve clause, salary determination, competitive balance in sports leagues, the market for franchises, tax sheltering, arenas and stadiums, and rival leagues. The authors present an abundance of historical material, much of it new, including team ownership histories and data on attendance, TV revenue, stadium and arena contracts, and revenues and costs. League histories, team statistics, stories about players and owners, and sports lore of all kinds embellish the work. Quirk and Fort are writing for anyone interested in sports in the 1990s: players, players' agents, general managers, sportswriters, and, most of all, sports fans."
AUTHORS
Rodney D. Fort
James Quirk
PUBLISHED
2018 in Princeton University Press

Add to List
Comparison of Home Advantage in College and Professional Team Sports in the United States.
"Home advantage in seven American college team sports (baseball, basketball, football, hockey, lacrosse, soccer and women's basketball) was compared with professional leagues in the United States for the same sports and for the same time period. A total of 81,063 college games and 22,477 professional games were analyzed for the four seasons 2006-07 to 2009-10. There was a significant home advantage, as measured by home winning percentage, in all sports, both college and professional. The overall home advantage in college sports was significantly greater than in professional sports (p<0.015). The mean difference was 3.73 home winning percentage points, being greatest for baseball, basketball, and hockey (all p<0.001). Plausible explanations for these results include differences in college and professional competition in terms of familiarity with local conditions, referee bias, territoriality and psychological factors. However, the influence of travel fatigue was inconclusive. Only for soccer was the home advantage greater for professionals. This was the only sport where crowd size appeared to be having an effect. In addition the rules of college soccer allow more substitution and hence greater coach intervention than in professional soccer, a factor that could also be reducing home advantage."
AUTHORS
Miguel A Gómez
Richard Pollard
PUBLISHED
2015 in Collegium Antropologicum

Add to List
The theater of sport
"Why is it more fun to watch a baseball game at Fenway than at Three Rivers? Why is football more exciting at Notre Dame or Alabama than in Ames, Iowa? Arguing that there is such a thing as the "perfect" place to watch or participate in a sporting event, Karl Raitz and his co-authors explain that it's not whether you win or lose, but where you play the game that counts. As sport evolved from "pure play" to "performance" to "entertainment," they explain, the places where sport took place evolved as well -- becoming more complex, adding more elements with which a spectator or participant could interact. But at the same time, such innovations as the multipurpose stadium ("Hey, is that Cincinnati or Pittsburgh?") tended to separate the place from the event, rendering the event "placeless" and devoid of enriching character. The authors show precisely why the new baseball stadiums in Baltimore, Cleveland, and Arlington "work" better than the concrete doughnuts of the 1960s and 70s. They explain why cricket is best enjoyed in an English village green, against the backdrop of a church tower (preferably with clock), half-timbered pub, haystacks, and elm trees. They analyze the ways in which the infield and grandstand form an essential part of the ambience at Churchill Downs -- and how tailgate parties do the same at the Talladega stock car races."
AUTHOR
Karl B. Raitz
PUBLISHED
1995 by Johns Hopkins University Press (Book)

Add to List
The Physics of Baseball
"The illumination of the ordinary—of why the sky is blue or why the stars shine—is not the least important role of physics and physicists. Then can&apos;t we add to the list of deeper queries some of the questions that seemed so important to me in my youth: How can Babe Ruth hit so many home runs? What makes Carl Hubble&apos;s curveball and screwball swerve in their trips to the plate? And if baseball plays no known role in the fundamental structure of the universe (see The Iowa Baseball Confederacy by W. P. Kinsella for a contrary position), it is not of trivial importance in the perception and appreciation of that universe by some of its inhabitants. Although not quite so important now, in the period between the Civil War and World War II baseball was a significant part of what defined the United States. Forty years ago, Jacques Barzun, a preeminent student of American culture and a native of France, said, “Whoever wants to know…America had better learn baseball.” But, even as the game itself is subtle and complex, I have found subtleties and complexities in my attempts to know the physical bases of this American game. For almost a century and a half, baseball has played a significant role in defining the United States; in defining the physics of baseball we confront the ill‐defined physics of the world in which we live."
AUTHOR
Robert K. Adair
PUBLISHED
in Physics Today

Add to List
Model of sweet spot on a baseball bat
"In the paper, collision mechanics is used to analyze the hitting process of the bats in the baseball games. The model is constructed in the paper to testify the sweet spot on a baseball bat. The vibration impulse on hands is analyzed. And the hitting point of the center of percussion with zero vibration impulse is obtained by quantitative calculation. Some reasons are given to explain why practical sweet spot is not at the end of the bat."
AUTHORS
Xiangping Xiao
Yong Bi
PUBLISHED
in 2nd International Conference on Information Engineering and Computer Science - Proceedings, ICIECS 2010

Add to List
Baseball on Trial
"The 1922 Federal Baseball Supreme Court ruling held that the “business of base ball” was not subject to the Sherman Antitrust Act because it did not constitute interstate commerce. This book explains why the unanimous Supreme Court opinion authored by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, which gave rise to Major League Baseball's exemption from antitrust law, was correct given the circumstances of the time. Currently a billion-dollar enterprise, professional baseball teams crisscross the country while the games are broadcast via radio, television, and Internet coast to coast. The sheer scope of this activity would seem to embody the phrase “interstate commerce.” Yet baseball is the only professional sport—indeed the sole industry—in the United States that currently benefits from a judicially constructed antitrust immunity. Using recently released documents from the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the book analyzes how the Supreme Court reached this seemingly peculiar result by tracing the Federal Baseball litigation from its roots in 1914 to its resolution in 1922, in the process uncovering significant new details about the proceedings. The book observes that while interstate commerce was measured at the time by the exchange of tangible goods, baseball teams in the 1910s merely provided live entertainment to their fans, while radio was a fledgling technology that had little impact on the sport. The book concludes that, despite the frequent criticism of the opinion, the Supreme Court's decision was consistent with the conditions and legal climate of the early twentieth century."
AUTHOR
Nathaniel Grow
PUBLISHED
2014 in University of Illinois Press

Add to List
Why no Baseball Work Stoppage?
"The 2002 negotiations between owners and players in major league baseball attracted national attention because of the history of past work stoppages in the sport. This article examines eight reasons why the negotiations successfully avoided a shutdown. Perhaps the most important of these reasons was that the players really did not want to strike— despite their announced intention to do so. The 232-day 1994-95 baseball strike, the longest ever in professional team sports, was devastating to both sides, and neither wanted to go through a similar experience."
AUTHOR
Paul D. Staudohar
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sports Economics

Add to List
Mathletics: How gamblers, managers, and sports enthusiasts use mathematics in baseball, basketball, and football
"Mathleticsis a remarkably entertaining book that shows readers how to use simple mathematics to analyze a range of statistical and probability-related questions in professional baseball, basketball, and football, and in sports gambling. How does professional baseball evaluate hitters? Is a singles hitter like Wade Boggs more valuable than a power hitter like David Ortiz? Should NFL teams pass or run more often on first downs? Could professional basketball have used statistics to expose the crooked referee Tim Donaghy? Does money buy performance in professional sports?InMathletics, Wayne Winston describes the mathematical methods that top coaches and managers use to evaluate players and improve team performance, and gives math enthusiasts the practical tools they need to enhance their understanding and enjoyment of their favorite sports--and maybe even gain the outside edge to winning bets.Mathleticsblends fun math problems with sports stories of actual games, teams, and players, along with personal anecdotes from Winston's work as a sports consultant. Winston uses easy-to-read tables and illustrations to illuminate the techniques and ideas he presents, and all the necessary math concepts--such as arithmetic, basic statistics and probability, and Monte Carlo simulations--are fully explained in the examples.After readingMathletics, you will understand why baseball teams should almost never bunt, why football overtime systems are unfair, why points, rebounds, and assists aren't enough to determine who's the NBA's best player--and much, much more. © 2009 by Princeton University Press. All Rights Reserved."
AUTHOR
Wayne L. Winston
PUBLISHED
in Mathletics: How Gamblers, Managers, and Sports Enthusiasts Use Math. in Baseball, Basketball, and Football

Add to List
Home advantage and crowd size in soccer: A worldwide study
"Home advantage is well documented in a wide range of team sports including association football (soccer). Crowd support appears to play a major role although the mechanisms through which it operates are unclear. Match data from major international club soccer competitions in four confederations of the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) were used to investigate the role crowd size plays in home advantage and how its effect may vary worldwide. Unadjusted home advantage did not vary significantly between continents. However, controlling for differences in crowd size produced highly significant (p<0.001) variation, with crowd adjusted home advantage -in terms of the percentage of goals scored by home teams -ranging from 56% in Europe to 67% in North America. For all continents combined, home advantage increased by 1.5% per each 10% increase in crowd size (p< 0.001). The effect of crowd size on home advantage in North America was twice that in other continents (p=0.03). A logarithmic association appears to best describe the effect of crowd size on home advantage in soccer. Directions for future research into home advantage include investigating the effects of other crowd factors such as density and proximity."
AUTHOR
C. Goumas
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sport Behavior

Add to List
Crowd effects and the home advantage
"Examined whether a home advantage exists in Major Junior-A ice hockey and explored the influence of factors associated with crowd presence (absolute size of crowd, crowd size relative to arena capacity, inter- vs intra-divisional rivalry, and time of year) and the 2-way interactions among these factors on game outcome. Archival data were obtained from 15 teams for 2 seasons (495 games in each). A significant home advantage was found when all games were considered (58.7%) and when tie games were excluded from the analyses (61.6%). Crowd density was significantly related to home advantage; as crowd density increased, the home advantage increased. Only a small percentage of the variance in home advantage can be explained by these crowd factors. (French, Spanish, German & Italian abstracts) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)"
AUTHORS
Albert V. Carron
Gary A. Agnew
PUBLISHED
in International Journal of Sport Psychology

Add to List
Crowds Provide Home Advantage
You can view the abstract at: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.296.5572.1397a
PUBLISHED
2002 in Science

Add to List
Crowd noise as a cue in referee decisions contributes to the home advantage
"The home advantage is one of the best established phenomena in sports (Courneya & Carron, 1992), and crowd noise has been suggested as one of its determinants (Nevill & Holder, 1999). However, the psychological processes that mediate crowd noise influence and its contribution to the home advantage are still unclear. We propose that crowd noise correlates with the criteria referees have to judge. As crowd noise is a valid cue, referee decisions are strongly influenced by crowd noise. Yet, when audiences are not impartial, a home advantage arises. Using soccer as an exemplar, we show the relevance of this influence in predicting outcomes of real games via a database analysis. Then we experimentally demonstrate the influence of crowd noise on referees' yellow cards decisions in soccer. Finally, we discuss why the focus on referee decisions is useful, and how more experimental research could benefit investigations of the home advantage."
AUTHOR
D. Unkelbach, C., & Memmert
PUBLISHED
in Journal of sport & exercise psychology

Add to List
Crowd noise as a cue in referee decisions contributes to the home advantage.
"The home advantage is one of the best established phenomena in sports (Courneya & Carron, 1992), and crowd noise has been suggested as one of its determinants (Nevill & Holder, 1999). However, the psychological processes that mediate crowd noise influence and its contribution to the home advantage are still unclear. We propose that crowd noise correlates with the criteria referees have to judge. As crowd noise is a valid cue, referee decisions are strongly influenced by crowd noise. Yet, when audiences are not impartial, a home advantage arises. Using soccer as an exemplar, we show the relevance of this influence in predicting outcomes of real games via a database analysis. Then we experimentally demonstrate the influence of crowd noise on referees' yellow cards decisions in soccer. Finally, we discuss why the focus on referee decisions is useful, and how more experimental research could benefit investigations of the home advantage."
AUTHORS
Daniel Memmert
Christian Unkelbach
PUBLISHED
2010 in Journal of sport & exercise psychology

Add to List
Cross-cultural and hemispheric laterality effects on the ensemble coding of emotion in facial crowds.
"In many social situations, we make a snap judgment about crowds of people relying on their overall mood (termed "crowd emotion"). Although reading crowd emotion is critical for interpersonal dynamics, the sociocultural aspects of this process have not been explored. The current study examined how culture modulates the processing of crowd emotion in Korean and American observers. Korean and American (non-East Asian) participants were briefly presented with two groups of faces that were individually varying in emotional expressions and asked to choose which group between the two they would rather avoid. We found that Korean participants were more accurate than American participants overall, in line with the framework on cultural viewpoints: Holistic versus analytic processing in East Asians versus Westerners. Moreover, we found a speed advantage for other-race crowds in both cultural groups. Finally, we found different hemispheric lateralization patterns: American participants were more accurate to perceive the facial crowd to be avoided when it was presented in the left visual field than the right visual field, indicating a right hemisphere advantage for processing crowd emotion of both European American and Korean facial crowds. However, Korean participants showed weak or nonexistent laterality effects, with a slight right hemisphere advantage for European American facial crowds and no advantage in perceiving Korean facial crowds. Instead, Korean participants showed positive emotion bias for own-race faces. This work suggests that culture plays a role in modulating our crowd emotion perception of groups of faces and responses to them."
AUTHORS
Jisoo Sun
Daniel N Albohn
Sang Chul Chong
Troy G Steiner
Reginald B Adams
Kestutis Kveraga et al
PUBLISHED
2017 in Culture and Brain

Add to List
Literature review
Home advantage in sport. An overview of studies on the advantage of playing at home
"This review identifies the most likely causes of home advantage. The results of previous studies have identified 4 factors thought to be responsible for the home advantage. These can be categorised under the general headings of crowd, learning, travel and rule factors. From the accumulated evidence, rule factors were found to play only a minor role (in a limited number of sports) in contributing to home advantage. Studies investigating the effect of learning factors found that little benefit was to be gained from being familiar with the local conditions when playing at home. There was evidence to suggest that travel factors were responsible for part of the home advantage, provided the journey involved crossing a number of time zones. However, since high levels of home advantage are observed within countries where travel distances are not great, travel factors were not thought to be a major cause of home advantage. The evidence from studies investigating crowd factors appeared to provide the most dominant causes of home advantage. A number of studies provide strong evidence that home advantage increases with crowd size, until the crowd reaches a certain size or consistency (a more balanced number of home and away supporters), after which a peak in home advantage is observed. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain these observations: either (i) the crowd is able to raise the performance of the home competitors relative to the away competitors; or (ii) the crowd is able to influence the officials to subconsciously favour the home team. The literature supports the latter to be the most important and dominant explanation. Clearly, it only takes 2 or 3 crucial decisions to go against the away team or in favour of the home team to give the side playing at home the 'edge'."
AUTHORS
R. L. Holder
A. M. Nevill
PUBLISHED
in Sports Medicine

Add to List
Literature review
Home advantage in sport: an overview of studies on the advantage of playing at home.
"This review identifies the most likely causes of home advantage. The results of previous studies have identified 4 factors thought to be responsible for the home advantage. These can be categorised under the general headings of crowd, learning, travel and rule factors. From the accumulated evidence, rule factors were found to play only a minor role (in a limited number of sports) in contributing to home advantage. Studies investigating the effect of learning factors found that little benefit was to be gained from being familiar with the local conditions when playing at home. There was evidence to suggest that travel factors were responsible for part of the home advantage, provided the journey involved crossing a number of time zones. However, since high levels of home advantage are observed within countries where travel distances are not great. travel factors were not thought to be a major cause of home advantage. The evidence from studies investigating crowd factors appeared to provide the most dominant causes of home advantage. A number of studies provide strong evidence that home advantage increases with crowd size, until the crowd reaches a certain size or consistency (a more balanced number of home and away supporters), after which a peak in home advantage is observed. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain these observations: either (i) the crowd is able to raise the performance of the home competitors relative to the away competitors; or (ii) the crowd is able to influence the officials to subconsciously favour the home team. The literature supports the latter to be the most important and dominant explanation. Clearly, it only takes 2 or 3 crucial decisions to go against the away team or in favour of the home team to give the side playing at home the 'edge'."
AUTHORS
R L Holder
A M Nevill
PUBLISHED
1999 in Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

Add to List
Home Advantage in Sport
"This review identifies the most likely causes of home advantage. The results of previous studies have identified 4 factors thought to be responsible for the home advantage. These can be categorised under the general headings of crowd, learning, travel and rule factors. From the accumulated evidence, rule factors were found to play only a minor role (in a limited number of sports) in contributing to home advantage. Studies investigating the effect of learning factors found that little benefit was to be gained from being familiar with the local conditions when playing at home. There was evidence to suggest that travel factors were responsible for part of the home advantage, provided the journey involved crossing a number of time zones. However, since high levels of home advantage are observed within countries where travel distances are not great, travel factors were not thought to be a major cause of home advantage. The evidence from studies investigating crowd factors appeared to provide the most dominant causes of home advantage.A number of studies provide strong evidence that home advantage increases with crowd size, until the crowd reaches a certain size or consistency (a more balanced number of home and away supporters), after which a peak in home advantage is observed. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain these observations: either (i) the crowd is able to raise the performance of the home competitors relative to the away competitors; or (ii) the crowd is able to influence the officials to subconsciously favour the home team. The literature supports the latter to be the most important and dominant explanation. Clearly, it only takes 2 or 3 crucial decisions to go against the away team or in favour of the home team to give the side playing at home the ‘edge’."
AUTHORS
Roger L. Holder
Alan M. Nevill
PUBLISHED
in Sports Medicine

Add to List
Home Advantage in Retractable-Roof Baseball Stadia
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills

Add to List
Home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia.
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
2012 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

Add to List
Home Advantage in Retractable-roof Baseball Stadia
"This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility."
AUTHOR
Paul Romanowich
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills

Add to List
The Home Advantage in Major League Baseball
"Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional\nsports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper\nadvances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to\nsupport the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual\nsports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in\nimpaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the\nextent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport\nrequires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the\nhome team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage.\nInteractions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less\ncommon in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B. Jones
PUBLISHED
in Perceptual and Motor Skills

Add to List
Literature review
THE HOME ADVANTAGE IN MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL.
"Home advantage is smaller in baseball than in other major professional sports for men, specifically football, basketball, or soccer. This paper advances an explanation. It begins by reviewing the main observations to support the view that there is little or no home advantage in individual sports. It then presents the case that home advantage originates in impaired teamwork among the away players. The need for teamwork and the extent of it vary from sport to sport. To the extent that a sport requires little teamwork it is more like an individual sport, and the home team would be expected to enjoy only a small advantage. Interactions among players on the same side (teamwork) are much less common in baseball than in the other sports considered."
AUTHOR
Marshall B Jones
PUBLISHED
2015 in Perceptual and Motor Skills

Add to List
The Home Advantage in the Nippon Professional Baseball
You can view the abstract at: https://doi.org/10.4992/pacjpa.74.0_1pm015
AUTHOR
Yoshinori TAKIGAMI
PUBLISHED
2010 in The Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Japanese Psychological Association

Add to List
The relationship between spit tobacco and baseball
"The use of spit tobacco (ST) is often associated with athletics at all levels. The sport of baseball has a long history and connection with the use of ST at all levels from as young as little league where a bubble gum product called Big League Chew prepares young mouths for the use of chewing tobacco to the minor and major league teams. The custom of using ST in baseball began more than a century ago when players on dusty baseball fields used the product to keep their mouths moist during games. It became more popular in the 1970s and 1980s in response to an aggressive marketing and promotion campaign targeted toward professional baseball players. This practice continued through the years because baseball is an activity that allows ST use through unique practice game situations, including the opportunity to use ST products during competition with less concern for hazardous conditions. The lulls in activity and a decreased risk of contact and or collision allow for increased ST consumption during games. Athletes at all levels of baseball are role models for young people, especially boys and should take advantage of that role and act as a positive role model for fans through diminished or complete cessation of ST use and participation in public education campaigns against the use of ST. The sport of baseball has a long history and connection with the use of ST. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)"
AUTHOR
Ted Eaves
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sport and Social Issues

Add to List
Drug use in baseball
"For more than a decade, sports pages, magazines, and news broadcasts in the United States have featured reports about the use of performance-enhancing substances (PESs) by players in Major League Baseball. To this point, however, few scholarly texts have examined the issue at length. In this chapter I address PES use in professional baseball from multiple angles. Following an historical overview, I review studies on the physics of increased bat speed and faster pitches, thus shedding light on why players use PESs. I then discuss media portrayals as well as organizational and public policy actions, before moving to sections on the Mitchell Report and the Biogenesis case. As the Biogenesis case illustrates, professional baseball players continued to use PESs in the years following the introduction of drug testing. Even with lengthy suspensions for positive tests, in addition to the possibility of sacrificing their (practical) eligibility for induction into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame, players appeared willing to take their chances. To date, the PES issue in professional baseball remains both contentious and unresolved. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)"
AUTHOR
Bryan E. Denham
PUBLISHED
in Routledge Handbook of Drugs and Sport

Add to List
Home advantage in professional tennis
"Home advantage is a pervasive phenomenon in sport. It has been established in team sports such as basketball, baseball, American football, and European soccer. Attention to home advantage in individual sports has so far been limited. The aim of this study was to examine home advantage in professional tennis. Match-level data are used to measure home advantage. The test used is based on logit models, and consistent specification is addressed explicitly. Depending on the interpretation of home advantage, restrictions on the specification of the model need to be imposed. We find that although significant home advantage exists for men, the performance of women tennis players appears to be unaffected by home advantage."
AUTHOR
Ruud H. Koning
PUBLISHED
2011 in Journal of Sports Sciences

Add to List
Home advantage in professional tennis
"Home advantage is a pervasive phenomenon in sport. It has been established in team sports such as basketball, baseball, American football, and European soccer. Attention to home advantage in individual sports has so far been limited. The aim of this study was to examine home advantage in professional tennis. Match-level data are used to measure home advantage. The test used is based on logit models, and consistent specification is addressed explicitly. Depending on the interpretation of home advantage, restrictions on the specification of the model need to be imposed. We find that although significant home advantage exists for men, the performance of women tennis players appears to be unaffected by home advantage."
AUTHOR
Ruud H. Koning
PUBLISHED
in Journal of Sports Sciences

Add to List

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
Do baseball players perform worse in years where they perceive themselves to be under-compensated?
6 studies
Submitted by: Anonymous

Is there really a home-field advantage in sports?
46 studies
Submitted by: THunter 88

Add question
What additional question do you want someone who searches for "Why is there a homefield advantage in baseball" to consider?